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Howie Glatter and Tublug Collimation for a Dob

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#1 csrlice12

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 12:44 PM

I remembering reading in another thread (can't find it now) there was a video on how to use the Howie Glatter Laser and Tublug to collimate your primary and secondary. Any body got a link to it? I'm more a visual then written word guy.

#2 CounterWeight

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:52 PM

Not exactly what you asked for but there is a great video tutorial here at Andys Shot Glass / telescopejunkies.

#3 starrancher

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:28 PM

Not exactly what you asked for but there is a great video tutorial here at Andys Shot Glass / telescopejunkies.


Andy's video and the site in general is fabulous .
:bow:

#4 JayinUT

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:45 AM

I am going to make and post a video on the Catseye and Glatter systems, when the weather clears. I thought of doing a Google Hangout which is live and getting live input and then posting the video at Google.

#5 FirstSight

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 07:52 AM

I am going to make and post a video on the Catseye and Glatter systems, when the weather clears. I thought of doing a Google Hangout which is live and getting live input and then posting the video at Google.


The photos (good) or video (better) for the Glatter/TuBlug collimation process can readily be done with any decent regular camera, the main logistical hurdle would be stably mounting the camera at the desired angles (although you could probably get by with a partner hand-holding an image-stabilized camera).

OTOH, taking decently usable still photos or videos of the Catseye collimation process would be prohibitively challenging without a camera capable of shooting through the narrow peephole of the sight tube, cheshire, and autocollimator as they are successively used in the process. I know CN member Jason Khadder created a nice video of Catseye/hotspot collimation from a peephole perspective, but I don't know what kind of video equipment he used.

You're a good man to undertake this project Jay, do you have a plan worked out for how to take pics or videos of the Catseye process, or are you still working out those details with your cabal of observing buds out in SLC? You do have some clever folks out there to work with.






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