Jump to content


Photo

Stray's Sketchbook

  • Please log in to reply
98 replies to this topic

#26 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 8335
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: La Union, PI

Posted 28 November 2012 - 04:17 AM

LOL

It's okay if I can copy your moon presentation at lower right. Get the other one, the mask and apply it...cover up those belt/zone guides.

Weedhopper, I have tried blacking and so forth. About the only thing I think made any difference, if any, was flocking the inside of the primary baffle. If nothing else, it feels good that it looks black inside.

#27 stray1

stray1

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 275
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2012
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:18 AM

LOL

It's okay if I can copy your moon presentation at lower right. Get the other one, the mask and apply it...cover up those belt/zone guides.

Weedhopper, I have tried blacking and so forth. About the only thing I think made any difference, if any, was flocking the inside of the primary baffle. If nothing else, it feels good that it looks black inside.


Copy away. Can't wait to see your version of the moons!

:grin:

-stray-

#28 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 8335
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: La Union, PI

Posted 29 November 2012 - 03:46 AM

With the way Pete has been driving me deeper into difficult observations of the Jovian moons, the sketches might surprise. :)

Anyway, was thinking about your sketch recently. You're showing more detail. Congrats. I still think your scope can show more. In theory and in good conditions, it should have the contrast of a slightly larger CAT.

#29 Chopin

Chopin

    Canis Insanus

  • *****
  • Posts: 4586
  • Joined: 03 Feb 2005
  • Loc: In the doghouse.

Posted 29 November 2012 - 09:45 AM

Stray, terrific Jovian sketch. Pretty soon, with repeated observations, you'll be catching sharper representations of those belt details. I enjoy following your progress. :cool:

#30 stray1

stray1

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 275
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2012
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:44 AM

Hi all,

Thanks for commenting. Chop, yes I believe that I am beginning to detect more detail; still have a long, long way to go. Norme, still working on that “theory”. My current limitations are more a lack of skill rather than lack of equipment…lol.

Anyway, for most of the evening of 29 Nov, transparency was rather poor. I could make out Luna, Jupiter, and Aldebaran but little else. By the time I arrived home from work (approx. 01:45 EST; 06:45 UT) things had cleared somewhat transparency-wise; however, Luna was washing out prime observing zones (Orion, Jupiter). Still, there were things to look at so I brewed a cup of java, set up the Astroview, and started slewing around. Really not the best viewing conditions per se.--frustrating, actually with a near-full moon.

M42/43: a pale shadow of its usual glorious self (however, I’m beginning to detect a hint of green in the nebula…a transparent bitter lime, perhaps :grin:).

33 Orionis: “Fuggit about it”, as Tony Soprano might say.

Delta Orionis (Mintaka): Blah. The Cosmic Cops must be on a donut break tonight.

Jupiter: Well, now, the 2nd brightest object in the night (early AM sky actually) was true. Even at low magnification (25mm) the EQ belts were visible as well as the NTB and the N & S Polar Regions. The SPR was not as apparent as it was a couple of nights ago, so I’ll attribute this to the filtering effect of the thicker haze I experienced on 28 Nov and NOT any major improvement due to my blackening the interior surface of the EP. Increased magnification and/or filters did not reveal additional detail so no “enlarged” sketches this morning.

Lest the session wind up as a complete bust, I went ahead and noted the positions of the moons and cranked out a rather boring sketch. I believe I got everything correct, but by the end I was so frustrated that I was ready to throw my coffee cup at anything that moved (I didn’t, BTW).

On nights like this I now understand why some beginners might slam their rig into a corner of the garage or basement and “fuggit about it”. Permanently.

*sigh*

:p

-stray-

Attached Files



#31 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 8335
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: La Union, PI

Posted 30 November 2012 - 05:00 AM

Sure, there will be frustrating nights. Fuggit about it. It's those good nights we live for.

#32 Chopin

Chopin

    Canis Insanus

  • *****
  • Posts: 4586
  • Joined: 03 Feb 2005
  • Loc: In the doghouse.

Posted 30 November 2012 - 08:05 AM

Norme said it. Fuggit about it. Keep on keepin on, you know. Learning how to get the most out of poor nights will also help with your observing abilities. I find that sketching in A-IV seeing forces me to stay glued to the EP, and quickly jot the details that reveal themselves in calm moments that last less than a Zsa Zsa Gabor marriage.

BTW, I'm glad to hear you didn't kill any squirrels with a caffeinated projectile.

Posted Image

#33 stray1

stray1

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 275
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2012
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 01 December 2012 - 10:14 PM

Thanks for comments and encouragement! No way I’m ready to quit over a night or two of frustration. Did the Natives quit at the Little Big Horn just because Custer’s pony soldiers started shooting back?

It’s was cloudy most of the day so I wasn’t really expecting to do any observing, but around 6:45 (11:45 UT) the sky opened briefly. Knowing that it would probably close just as quick, I scrambled to the garage and grabbed my rapid deploy rig—the Meade StarFinder that perpetually awaits such fleeting opportunisms (I was feeling too lazy to set up the Orion).

Big J was still pretty low in the sky and partially obscured in the branches of a black walnut tree. I tracked it for a couple of minutes and found that there was an opening in the branches just large enough to allow me to see the disk and three of the moons once they rose above their current position. While waiting for them to come into view I made a quick sketch of the branches and when Jupiter and companions were “framed” they were added to the sketch. According to Stellarium the moons are Europa, Callisto, and Ganymede.
While not exactly what was viewed in the EP, this finished “product” at the least captures the spirit of the moment. (Chop, you can make a copy of this and have it put on a coffee mug if you wish…lol).

Plus I have a question concerning UT (which I have only recently been adding to my sketches). My time zone (EST) is -5 UT, so if it is 7PM (19:00) my time, it is 00:00 UT. Is this correct?

:grin:

-stray-

Attached Files



#34 stray1

stray1

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 275
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2012
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 01 December 2012 - 10:26 PM

Here are a couple of practice thumbnails I drew from photos on Google. It has been years since I've tried to draw anything with pencil, so I am trying to "recondition" my clumsy fingers to accommodate this new hobby of mine. I limited myself to 10 minutes per sketch to simulate those "speed drills" my art instructor taught me back in college.

Geez...

:grin:

-stray-

Attached Files



#35 AdirondackAstro

AdirondackAstro

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 391
  • Joined: 06 Jun 2011
  • Loc: Plattsburgh, NY

Posted 01 December 2012 - 10:36 PM

Plus I have a question concerning UT (which I have only recently been adding to my sketches). My time zone (EST) is -5 UT, so if it is 7PM (19:00) my time, it is 00:00 UT. Is this correct?

:grin:

-stray-


You got it, we here on the east coast need to add 5 hours for UT. Be careful when we switch the clocks though, there is a brief period where they don't change their clocks, or they do and we don't, can't remember, but right now you're fine.

#36 stray1

stray1

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 275
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2012
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 02 December 2012 - 02:26 AM

Thanks Mike! I thought I had the UT correct :)

Like your blog, BTW. Great AP!

:grin:

-stray-

#37 AdirondackAstro

AdirondackAstro

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 391
  • Joined: 06 Jun 2011
  • Loc: Plattsburgh, NY

Posted 02 December 2012 - 02:36 AM

Thanks a lot, Stray. I do a bit of sketching now and then. I really need to get into it more. Would be a nice comparison of through the eyepiece to go along with my images.

BTW, I forgot to mention you've got some really good sketches here!

#38 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 8335
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: La Union, PI

Posted 02 December 2012 - 04:24 AM

Goodness, Stray, I thought you either developed robo eyeballs or ungraded to a 6" refractor. Sketching practice, okay got it. Whew! Thought there was a new sheriff in town. :)

And you captured the tree limbs...:lol: Well, that's actually kind of cool, not like we've never peeked between the limbs before. Okay, I can dig it. It would make a nice coffee cup logo.

#39 stray1

stray1

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 275
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2012
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 02 December 2012 - 04:39 AM

And you captured the tree limbs...:lol: Well, that's actually kind of cool, not like we've never peeked between the limbs before.


Not exactly optimal viewing, but sometimes we gotta dance with the one who brung us.

:grin:

-stray-

#40 stray1

stray1

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 275
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2012
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 05 December 2012 - 04:07 AM

Success! (I think)

After nearly two weeks of pretty lousy viewing conditions, including rain most of today, the sky overhead "finally" opened up for me! Transparency was really good, but seeing left a lot to be desired...everything was rolling or jittery (heck, Mizar A/B looked like they were dancing a sailor's jig :lol:). Didn't matter, it was wonderful for me this morning (cold, clammy, 100% humidity, dew dripping from my rig within minutes...woooondeeerfuuul!).

Primary target was the Big J. N & S polar regions were apparent as were the NTB and both big belts at 25mm. Settled into my chair and dropped in the 10mm...something was "different"...along the lower edge of the NEB there appeared to be two dark "smudges" that I had never noticed before. Floaters? I cleared my eye. Still there. Dust on my EP? Dropped in the 8mm. Still there. The 6mm. There they were. Tried a bunch of different EPs, filters, and the x2 Barlow just to be sure. Walked away from the rig and drank some coffee. Looked again. Still there.

I had no intention of making a sketch this evening, it was supposed to be a pure viewing session; however, after seeing what I saw I realized that I had to put something down on "paper". For the sake of argument, please ignore the sloppiness of this presentation; color, blur, and band/moon placement were secondary as I whipped this up from memory. The dark splotches are the subject of this piece. I KNOW that I observed them. :jump:

I'm thinking that they are probably festoons, but I cannot be sure of this unless someone else made a similar observation around the same time. All I know is that they were there and I have never noticed them before this morning.

:grin:

-stray-

Attached Files



#41 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 8335
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: La Union, PI

Posted 05 December 2012 - 04:22 AM

Oh! Festoons! Yea, probably for sure, Stray. First off, you are making great strides and repeating the same nervous behavior I engage in, sipping coffee...walking around...then going back to look. Not a bad habbit, really. Relax a little. :)

Okay, at 0730UT on 5 Dec, you were at System I meridian (EZ and EQ belts, basically) of ~34 degrees.

You can find that here. http://www.arksky.org/newcmcalc.htm

Now, double check from here (or the CN imaging forum, but they almost never list what longitude they imaged.)
http://alpo-j.asahik...est/Jupiter.htm

Initial look shows some images at Sys I ~50 degrees. Close enough for an initial peek. Guess what? Two faint festoons! Well done!

http://alpo-j.asahik...12/j121204z.htm

:goodjob: :rockon: :applause:

#42 frank5817

frank5817

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8495
  • Joined: 13 Jun 2006
  • Loc: Illinois

Posted 05 December 2012 - 08:54 PM

-stray- The sketching collection keeps growing here - very fine work.

Frank :)

#43 stray1

stray1

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 275
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2012
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 06 December 2012 - 04:12 AM

Thanks everyone for your pervious comments. They are greatly appreciated!

I tried something different this morning during my Jupiter observation. Rather than sketch it and then attempt to transfer over to paint.net, I simply scanned the sketch that I made at my rig and cleaned it up a little. I think this results in an image somewhat closer to what I am actually seeing thru my EP.

I believe that I captured another festoon along the lower edge of the NEB as well as a couple of areas where the EZ seemed to “cut” into the NEB and SEB. The SEB seemed thinner than usual, but I think this because the GRS had just passed through and churned things up a bit (did not see the GRS). The NPR and NTB were apparent (NPR smaller than usual) as well as the SPR (usually small for me with few exceptions) but, nothing south of the SEB was detectable (basically a void). Additionally, I am beginning to detect that both big belts take on a “speckled” appearance, like they were hit with a thin stream of white from an airbrush; however, I cannot say that I am actually seeing white spots, etc. These details are vague for me.

According to the notes that I jotted down before going outside (sometimes I get distracted and forget my purpose…heck, sometimes I forget to jot notes) my objectives this session were: a) split the NEB, b) detect festoons, and c) detect the GRS (according to Stellarium it should have just been visible along the preceding limb).

a) Split the NEB: No.

b) Detect festoons: Yes (at least a dark spot/blob in the proper location…lol).

c) Detect GRS: No.

Before packing up for the morning I swung over and had a peek at M42/43. Outstanding! I also swung over to take a gander at ETA Cas but, alas, Cas had settled into the LP dome to my north. Plus, a thin layer of clouds was beginning to move in. Rain in the forecast over the next couple of days. T-storms on Saturday :ooo:

Attached Files



#44 stray1

stray1

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 275
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2012
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 06 December 2012 - 04:15 AM

Oh, yeah, Norme, thank you very kindly for the links. These will be invaluable to me in the future. Now, if I can just figure out what System(s) I-III mean... :question:

:grin:

-stray-

#45 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 8335
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: La Union, PI

Posted 06 December 2012 - 04:51 AM

Me, too Stray.

Best I can derive, system I is the faster rotating system of belts that include the EZ and most of the NEB and SEB. North and south of that region are the north and south tropical, temperate, and polar regions. That is system II, the slower rotating cloud belts. System II I believe is radio frequencies and we can safely ignore it.

Your sketching is great and your observing seems to have improved. You're getting much closer to what your scope can deliver. It may have a little more to offer.

The dents on the underside of the NEB are probably caused by festoon "roots" bulging into the EZ. This gives it that undulating appearance, and some parts are darker as you've shown.

Not sure what caused that dent in the north of the SEB, but it looks interesting. It could be part of the wake. It might also be some of the broader, white features in the southern EZ (SEZ.) Need to check that out.

#46 Chopin

Chopin

    Canis Insanus

  • *****
  • Posts: 4586
  • Joined: 03 Feb 2005
  • Loc: In the doghouse.

Posted 06 December 2012 - 09:39 AM

I like your computer generated images, but I think I like this pencil sketch even better, Stray! You are really starting to pick up those details well. :waytogo:

I agree that your undulation is undoubtedly caused by festoons, or "festoon roots" as Norme so brilliantly named them. Keep going. You are starting to see that 90mm is capable of digging into the Jovian surface once you recognize the landscape.

#47 Special Ed

Special Ed

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7064
  • Joined: 18 May 2003
  • Loc: Greenbrier County, WV 38N, 80W

Posted 08 December 2012 - 08:00 AM

Stray,

Just got a chance to look at your virtual sketchbook--you have a nice collection of drawings here. Your perserverance in studying and sketching Jupiter is showing results. :)

Best I can derive, system I is the faster rotating system of belts that include the EZ and most of the NEB and SEB. North and south of that region are the north and south tropical, temperate, and polar regions. That is system II, the slower rotating cloud belts. System II I believe is radio frequencies and we can safely ignore it.


Just a slight correction to what Norme says here--System I is the region about 10° north and south of the Jovian equator. System I is basically the Equatorial Zone (EZ).

System II is the rest of Jupiter from 10° N/S to the poles.

I think there is a typo about the radio signal system--it should say System III, not System II.

Good luck with your Jupiter observations!

#48 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 8335
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: La Union, PI

Posted 08 December 2012 - 08:06 AM

Thanks, Michael. I never could find a source that said it explicitly. So, I stretched it to the jets in the northern NEB and southern SEB thinking that would be about right.

#49 Special Ed

Special Ed

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7064
  • Joined: 18 May 2003
  • Loc: Greenbrier County, WV 38N, 80W

Posted 08 December 2012 - 08:45 AM

No problemo. And since System I is about 10° N/S, I believe it includes the jets on the northern SEB and the southern NEB.

Here is one source of info about Jupiter.

http://www.britastro...piter/guide.htm

John Rogers is the head of the Jupiter section of BAA and Damian Peach is one of the best imagers in the world. :cool:

#50 Asbytec

Asbytec

    Guy in a furry hat

  • *****
  • Posts: 8335
  • Joined: 08 Aug 2007
  • Loc: La Union, PI

Posted 08 December 2012 - 09:47 AM

Thank you, read that a while back. Still trying to decipher Systems. And, yes, I think system III should be corrected above. It was a typo. I think I got that from you in an earlier post.

But, this is confusing, from the link above.

"DL2: Peak speed in System II (degrees per 30 days), as calculated from the first two columns.
(Note: DL1 = DL2 – 229; DL3 = DL2 – 8.)
Eastward (prograding) jets have positive u3 and negative DL2.
Westward (retrograding) jets have negative u3 and positive DL2."

Okay, first they mention only System II, that's already confusing. But, the positive DL2 retrograde winds are at latitudes ~17N and ~20S. This seems to mean everything between across the EZ, including the NEBs and SEBn, probably blows eastward at varying speeds. Their chart shows that. This is what I thought was system I. Gaa! :)

If we (meaning me) ever figure this out, it can be referenced in Stray's sketchbook. :)






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics