Jump to content


Photo

Thoughts on Orion V Block Filter

  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 orion61

orion61

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4752
  • Joined: 20 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Birthplace James T Kirk

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:06 AM

I am wondering If I can get a cross section of members opinions on the V-Block filter? I did read the review here but would like to see the "General" feeling after the filter, has been around a few years.
Are prople still useing them? Are they as advertised, and do the coatings last.
To circumvent the inevitable dogging of Acros by those of you who have the means of affording 2-8k APO refractors, please, I know the performance difference, I know yours is much better, and there will be some who believe Acros are not worth having, Not interested in that story.
But I have what I have, and my Childs future is more important than spending what we have on a Tak, or TMB, TeleVue etc.
Are V-Block filters worth buying?
I have a prototype Celestron 127mm Acromat, we all know they chose the 6". I also have an outstanding MINT, mid 80's Celestron/Vixen C80 F11. I cant imagine a better "corrected" lens figure wise, except C.A.
Still 5" of glass can see a lot. Worth buying? From what I have seen, its either yes or an absolute NO..
Thanks for taking the time reading this, and replying.
LB

#2 russell23

russell23

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4455
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:29 AM

Yes, But I would recommend the Baader Fringe Killer. I have one permanently mounted on the diagonal for my Vixen 140 neo-achro refractor. It noticeably sharpens the star images allowing me to get tight pinpoint stars at much higher magnification than without the filter. It also cleans up the overall light quality of the field - higher definition if you will.

I see no obvious loss of light when using the filter.

I've tried the Orion V-block filter. I think the Baader Fringe Killer is a much better filter. The color shift in the Baader filter is milder than in the V-block.

Dave

#3 astrogeezer41

astrogeezer41

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 102
  • Joined: 27 Aug 2010

Posted 19 November 2012 - 11:02 AM

Dave,
I very much agree with what you say about the Baader Fringe Filter. I use one with my ES AR102 and get the same results that you speak of.

I have an Orion V-block but it gives a much greater color shift and dims objects more, probably because it was originally intended for an f/5 achromat.

I think that LB would be much happier with the Baader.

-Robert

#4 orion61

orion61

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4752
  • Joined: 20 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Birthplace James T Kirk

Posted 19 November 2012 - 11:05 AM

Thanks Guys for the great info! is there a color shift with the Baader?
whats the cost?
Larry

#5 Zamboni

Zamboni

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 897
  • Joined: 03 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Colorado Springs

Posted 19 November 2012 - 11:09 AM

For a 1.25" fringe killer, the cost is only around $4 more than the Orion at OPT.

#6 russell23

russell23

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4455
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 19 November 2012 - 11:27 AM

Thanks Guys for the great info! is there a color shift with the Baader?
whats the cost?
Larry


Color shift is very mild with the Fringe Killer. Even on the Moon I hardly notice it. If you hold up the Fringe Killer and look through it in daylight you see a mild color effect. I've compared at night with and without the filter and the color shift is very minor for lunar/planetary and inconsequential for deep sky. I still see nice rich star colors when looking at star clusters. The Orion V-block was very different. It had a much stronger color shift that was easily detectable. I didn't like it myself.

If you were worried about color shift you could go with the Baader semi-Apo filter, but the semi-apo achieves color neutrality by reducing additional wavelengths in the yellow/green part of the spectrum. I did feel there was some image dimming with the semi-apo filter.

Dave

#7 astrogeezer41

astrogeezer41

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 102
  • Joined: 27 Aug 2010

Posted 19 November 2012 - 01:39 PM

The color shift of the Baader Fringe Filter is to the pale yellow. It's not bad at all and only seems (to me) to be noticeable on the Moon, Venus, and Jupiter. I do not notice any color shift on the many double stars that I like to observe whether they be white, red, blue, orange, yellow, etc.

I personally do not care for the semi-apo filter. It does too much for my taste.

Hope this helps,
Robert

#8 russell23

russell23

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4455
  • Joined: 31 May 2009
  • Loc: Upstate NY

Posted 19 November 2012 - 02:28 PM

The color shift of the Baader Fringe Filter is to the pale yellow. It's not bad at all and only seems (to me) to be noticeable on the Moon, Venus, and Jupiter. I do not notice any color shift on the many double stars that I like to observe whether they be white, red, blue, orange, yellow, etc.

I personally do not care for the semi-apo filter. It does too much for my taste.

Hope this helps,
Robert


I agree with you Robert. I think the semi-Apo filter does too much. But I know some people don't want even the slightest color shift that the Fringe Killer gives. For me the Fringe Killer is perfect.

Dave

#9 David Pavlich

David Pavlich

    Transmographied

  • *****
  • Administrators
  • Posts: 27775
  • Joined: 18 May 2005
  • Loc: Mandeville, LA USA

Posted 19 November 2012 - 04:11 PM

I had better luck with the William Optics minus Violet filter. The Orion induced too much of a yellow cast.

David

#10 dlapoint

dlapoint

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1000
  • Joined: 17 Aug 2003
  • Loc: Moncton NB Canada

Posted 19 November 2012 - 04:45 PM

There are a lot of some what negative comments on the V block. I've used it on 3 different scopes. 127 f6.5, 152 f5.9 and 420 f6 I found it behaved differently on all 3 scopes. With the 152 achro is seems to work really, really well, with little color shift. One the 127 it did not do as well and turned everything really yellow. The third scope was the same as the last. I think it goes by how the scope was corrected in the first place.

#11 m9x18

m9x18

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1166
  • Joined: 12 Oct 2007
  • Loc: Abilene, Texas USA

Posted 19 November 2012 - 05:44 PM

I think it goes by how the scope was corrected in the first place.



In addition to that, most observers will notice a color bias to any given lens. Some lenses are biased toward the warm, some toward the cool and others that lean toward neutral. Adding any kind of filter to a scope will introduce its own effects depending on different factors. I imagine the results will vary from lens to lens.

#12 caheaton

caheaton

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1604
  • Joined: 26 May 2009
  • Loc: SW Ohio

Posted 23 November 2012 - 12:14 PM

I have both the Baader Semi-Apo and the Orion V-block. Like another poster said, different filters for different scopes. I only use them on planets, and I've found with the 120mm F/8 the V-block is the better filter. It does a great job on Jupiter...dimming the planets glare a bit and sharpening details. It did likewise for Mars.

#13 Rustie

Rustie

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 154
  • Joined: 07 Apr 2005
  • Loc: Southampton, UK

Posted 28 February 2013 - 09:13 AM

Been looking to get a filter for my SW 102 F5. Up to now i have used a light yellow filter which eradicates all CA but at the expense of a strong colour shift. By removing the CA is does help see some finer detail and i've been mightily impressed how well the 102 holds high power. Our C6 beats it no problem but the C6 is not smaller enough or robust enough for a family holiday.
So after days of trawling through endless reviews i am absolutely no wiser then when i started.
Some people say the yellow filter i have now is better than any of the dedicated MV filters. Others say the Semi-Apo is best. While other threads, like this one, say the Fringe Killer rules. I think my head is going to explode....lol
At the moment i'm worried these filters are just glorified yellow filters at 4x the price.

#14 oldtimer

oldtimer

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1332
  • Joined: 13 Nov 2008
  • Loc: Lake County Illinois

Posted 04 March 2013 - 02:37 PM

I think I've tried them all. The Orion V block is a 'strong' filter and is needed for something like my 100 F5 achro. I use the 'Fringe Killer on my 127 F6.5 achro.

BUT they both work better when coupled with a gray or 50% ND filter.

#15 Rustie

Rustie

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 154
  • Joined: 07 Apr 2005
  • Loc: Southampton, UK

Posted 05 March 2013 - 05:09 AM

Many thanks the info. The Orion V Block just happens to be the cheapest option here in the UK, which is strange as Orion bits tend to be pricey. I already have an ND 4 filter, so will combine that with the V Block when it arrives.
Thanks again.

#16 oldtimer

oldtimer

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1332
  • Joined: 13 Nov 2008
  • Loc: Lake County Illinois

Posted 06 March 2013 - 08:48 PM

The ND4 filter is probably too strong. I would experiment with one that reduces brightness by 25 to 50%






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics