Jump to content


Photo

Solar Filter !

  • Please log in to reply
23 replies to this topic

#1 wky46

wky46

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1950
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2005
  • Loc: west Ky.

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:06 PM

Just ordered the Baader solar filter film cell for my 10" SCT through Astrozap :cool:. Needed a new lens and EP heater strip so I went ahead and added the solar filter as well while I had Joe on the line (very pleasant in dealing with BTW). Might as well get full use out of my scope as I'm sure the kids will appreciate it as much as I will. I understand that it will allow sunspot and granulation observation which should be pretty neat. The sun has always intrigued me, especially as a kid looking through a cheap 60mm refractor and the solar EP that came with it. Still can't afford a hydrogen-alpha scope, but it's a start!

#2 GpB311

GpB311

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 288
  • Joined: 29 May 2012
  • Loc: Los Angeles, CA

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:15 PM

I had read somewhere that sunspots is all you really get out of solar film. While still interesting, that had always been one of the reasons I didnt bother buying any, but if granulation becomes visible too, id prob give it a shot as well. Keep us posted how it works for ya!

#3 wky46

wky46

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1950
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2005
  • Loc: west Ky.

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:51 PM

As with planet/moon observing, I think solar film viewing relies heavily on seeing conditions as well. So while I'm realistic on my expectations, I do expect that on those rare steady days, I'm hoping granulation should be evident. If not, then sunspots and transits will have to do (are there even any transits predicted anytime soon?)

#4 GOLGO13

GOLGO13

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3053
  • Joined: 05 Nov 2005
  • Loc: St. Louis area

Posted 19 November 2012 - 10:59 PM

Solar observing is a lot of fun. Even just sunspot observing. Of course, an alternative is spaceweather.com and follow the link toward the bottom of the page for SOHO.

Still, solar capabilites for your scope comes in handy for things like objects transiting the sun (like Venus just did...of course it won't again in our lifetime). I watched Mercury transit the sun a few years back as well.

Even more exciting is Hydrogen Alpha filters. But they do cost a good amount. I had a PST and it was awesome. I sold it to fund my 80mm apo. I do miss it a lot, and unfortunately it's gone up a bit in price. I should try to get another one someday...maybe a little better than the PST, though that was a cool scope.

#5 jerwin

jerwin

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 955
  • Joined: 16 May 2012
  • Loc: Romeoville IL

Posted 19 November 2012 - 11:12 PM

are there even any transits predicted anytime soon?


You missed Venus for the rest of your lifetime. Mercury is in 2016, May 9th to be exact, but tiny tiny tiny.

The Venus transit was a beautiful thing, I'm glad I discovered a love for astronomy and had a solar filter before it came and went.

Jim

#6 jerwin

jerwin

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 955
  • Joined: 16 May 2012
  • Loc: Romeoville IL

Posted 19 November 2012 - 11:18 PM

I have a Lunt LS60 pressure tuned double stack. Bought it used and darn near part by part, but it's a beautiful scope, cost me about 2700 by the time I was done.

The stars don't change. Don't get me wrong, I look at M13 every night and still love it, but it's the same today as it was last month and it will be the same next month. The sun is different every day and pretty amazing to look at in H-Alpha.

Check out the solar forum, some amazing pictures there that are more realistic than the shots of DSO's. Still some photo editing involved, but much closer to the real thing.

Jim

#7 GOLGO13

GOLGO13

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3053
  • Joined: 05 Nov 2005
  • Loc: St. Louis area

Posted 19 November 2012 - 11:23 PM

Not to mention light polluted skies don't exist during the day (well, sunlight skies). So solar observing is a great thing for those of us in the city.

Just wish the HA scopes were a little cheaper.

#8 wky46

wky46

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1950
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2005
  • Loc: west Ky.

Posted 19 November 2012 - 11:48 PM

I have a Lunt LS60 pressure tuned double stack. Bought it used and darn near part by part, but it's a beautiful scope, cost me about 2700 by the time I was done.

The stars don't change. Don't get me wrong, I look at M13 every night and still love it, but it's the same today as it was last month and it will be the same next month. The sun is different every day and pretty amazing to look at in H-Alpha.

Check out the solar forum, some amazing pictures there that are more realistic than the shots of DSO's. Still some photo editing involved, but much closer to the real thing.

Jim

Jim, I refuse to visit anymore the Solar or the Questar Forum here. I'm much too weak (and poor) :help:

#9 GOLGO13

GOLGO13

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3053
  • Joined: 05 Nov 2005
  • Loc: St. Louis area

Posted 19 November 2012 - 11:57 PM

I am in contact with a craigslist seller for a questar local...I offered 600...but they said 800 is their lowest. Seems like that could be OK. But I don't think I want to spend that much right now. I'd have to sell quite a few things. Or turn around and sell it if it's worth more than 800.

#10 beatlejuice

beatlejuice

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1568
  • Joined: 05 Apr 2011
  • Loc: Hamilton, ON,Canada

Posted 20 November 2012 - 02:06 AM

Phil, I think you will enjoy that filter. There is actually lots to see with this filter. The umbra and penumbra of the sunspots themselves are full of significant detail. The bright areas called faculae are quite visible in areas where there are no sunspots as well, especially close to the limb. With excellent seeing it is possible to see granulation, (a green filter will help). You may also notice the limb darkening of the sun around the edges. The features that are visible change from day to day and week to week, you never know what will appear as the sun goes through its rotation. This Daily picture will give you an idea of what too expect on any particular day.

Eric

#11 Dennis_S253

Dennis_S253

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1707
  • Joined: 22 Nov 2011
  • Loc: West Central Florida

Posted 20 November 2012 - 08:15 AM

I find it interesting. It changes right in front of yours eyes. I thought that if we look at all the wonders in the sky, why not look at our parent star. I hope you enjoy it. Clear skies...

#12 wky46

wky46

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1950
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2005
  • Loc: west Ky.

Posted 20 November 2012 - 08:29 AM

Thanks for the link Eric! Well worth the purchase if I get views like that, that's what I'm hoping for anyway. And yes Dennis, how true. I sometimes will set my scope up before the sun goes down and often times wish I had a good solar filter. I'll give a full report after it arrives

#13 randtek

randtek

    Under the radar

  • *****
  • Posts: 1346
  • Joined: 18 Jun 2005
  • Loc: Central Indiana

Posted 20 November 2012 - 11:47 AM

Here is a composite I made of several shots I took through my Baader solar filter of the Venus Transit. The larger version in the center was processed to bring out some granulation detail. These were hand held shots at the viewfinder, Afocal with a Canon Powershot A620 "point and shoot" camera, using Shutter Speed priority. This may give you an idea of what you can expect to see.

Attached Files



#14 wky46

wky46

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1950
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2005
  • Loc: west Ky.

Posted 20 November 2012 - 06:35 PM

Those are awesome shots Randy. These are the kinda views I'm hoping for :cool: It's in transit now and was hoping it would be here in time for Thanksgiving when the family will be here. Kinda doubt it but who knows

#15 Doc Willie

Doc Willie

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1629
  • Joined: 31 Mar 2010
  • Loc: Mid-Hudson Valley, NY, USA

Posted 20 November 2012 - 06:40 PM

I find it helpful to use color filters while viewing through solar film. Some say it helps bring out faculae (green) or granulation (blue).

I also find the green much easier on the eyes for prolonged viewing.

Experiment.

#16 wky46

wky46

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1950
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2005
  • Loc: west Ky.

Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:57 AM

I will Doc, thanks!

#17 wky46

wky46

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1950
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2005
  • Loc: west Ky.

Posted 23 November 2012 - 07:28 PM

Yay, arrived today.... but got home too late to look through. Tomorrows looks promising though! Here's something to look forward to with a filter- 2017 total solar eclipse http://en.wikipedia....se_of_August_21,_ The longest duration of totality will be just 30 miles west of me :cool:

#18 JLovell

JLovell

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 850
  • Joined: 12 Jan 2010
  • Loc: Georgia

Posted 23 November 2012 - 09:34 PM

Cool! That eclipse will go right over me too! When I was in high school in the early 80's, the peak was right on my high school. They let us out part of the day so we could see it. I'm glad to have the opportunity to see another one.

#19 Doc Willie

Doc Willie

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1629
  • Joined: 31 Mar 2010
  • Loc: Mid-Hudson Valley, NY, USA

Posted 24 November 2012 - 07:02 AM

I have found that working on the Astronomical League's Sunspotter certificate has increased my enjoyment of solar observing. It focusses my viewing, and learning about the classification and physics of sunspots has been rewarding.

#20 wky46

wky46

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1950
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2005
  • Loc: west Ky.

Posted 24 November 2012 - 07:58 AM

That would certainly make it more interesting Doc. I may have to check into it a little deeper, thanks.

#21 wky46

wky46

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1950
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2005
  • Loc: west Ky.

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:13 AM

Only 5 yrs. to go JLovell :jump: (it seemed like yesterday it was 10 yrs. away :lol:)

#22 wky46

wky46

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1950
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2005
  • Loc: west Ky.

Posted 24 November 2012 - 08:44 AM

Just came back in from a quick look.... very cool! Sun was rising, high thin clouds and my scope was warming up in the sun (that's a switch) but saw some sunspots, some light patching and definately a hint of granulation. I've got to read up on just what the heck I'm seeing on the surface. Might just have the neighbors over for a peek. Glad I got it :D

#23 wky46

wky46

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1950
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2005
  • Loc: west Ky.

Posted 24 November 2012 - 02:20 PM

The largest sunspot I'm seeing is a near perfect triangle shape with several 'dashes' underneath, all slowly moving along throughout the day...very interesting. Seeing goes from extremely turbulant and hazy, to perfectly still with photographic detail all over the orb. On those brief moments of perfect seeing, I can really appreciate the dimensional effect given from the surface features. A view through binoviewers would have to be striking. I think I'm gonna like this :cool:

#24 wky46

wky46

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1950
  • Joined: 12 Dec 2005
  • Loc: west Ky.

Posted 24 November 2012 - 04:18 PM

The sunspot pyramid has broken into two parts now. The seeing steadily got better as the day shortened and I was allowed some wonderful glimpses of several different types of surface features in those short hours of viewing. It certainly gives me incentive to learn just what all those features are. The filters off now and the dew heaters back on the scope in anticipation of the night. It is all well worth the money in my book. I tried upping the mag. once but I've found that the 32mm Plossl works just as well for me during the day as during the night. Looking through the EP during the day sure exagerates those floaters, huh? I'll just have to see what you have in store tomorrow old Sol!






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics