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Jupiter 19 Nov Io Eclipse

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#1 Asbytec

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 03:09 AM

Well, another in a string of Jupiter sightings. Wanted to, and did, just enjoy Jupiter all by myself. Just me and Jove, alone under the stars. But, you know what, Jove had different ideas. It began to show some interesting features.

First was the brilliant blue festoon. First one I've seen in a while. Then the rift we have seen more than a few times rolled toward the preceding edge, and another one rolled into view. There were some softer features between the rifts. Okay, that just begged for a sketch to share with you all.

About a half hour later, 1522UT on 19 Nov, Io slowly dimmed into the black of space. Seemed to take about a minute to disappear. Kind of neat.

Pete, I did observe Callisto at 380x, but could only see a faint, eh...call it beaver. Yes, beaver is a color.

http://en.wikipedia....t_of_colors#Red

It looked a bit like Uranus in that the color seemed to roll slightly even in perfect 10/10 seeing that night. Ganymede, no real variations of note, either.

On Jupiter, I really tried to bring out the soft features in the North. In the south, the belts were a little stronger. In fact, I got the impression there were really two belts in the STB as shown. And a prominent white one further south. The STB did have an abrupt break in it near the trailing limb. A white oval maybe?

The SPR seems darker, maybe giving the SPR a two toned appearance (as Pete mentioned during his observation.) So far, I have not seen much darkening in the NPR. I hope the limb shading turned out okay.

The NTB was giving that fine "eyeliner" look, again, with some fine, darker feature topping it off. Oh, and the NTZ was definitely grey! It was not white, like the STrZ, but sure enough grey. I thought that was beautiful. :)

One last comment, what eye do you observe with? I am left eye dominate, but observe with the right eye. The dominate eye did seem tad better. Gotta use it more often, other than for sighting a billiard shot.

Thanks for looking. Sys ~300, seeing 9 to 10/10, Trans Mag 5. UO 12mm HD Ortho at 164x. No filter.

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#2 Asbytec

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 03:32 AM

Here's another a bit darker. Which appears best on your monitor?

To me, this one exaggerates the darker feature embedded in the SEB. Maybe I can lighten the feature then "auto correct" the whole image. But, the belts look more black than ruddy, too.

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#3 Andrev

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 03:58 AM

Norme.

Man you are really getting good. So much details. A real delight to watch. The floating clouds in the upper belt are very interesting feature as well as the blue festoon. Congratulation Norme, you really make it real. So much details.

I prefer the upper version. And about your question on which eye we observe, the funny thing is my right eye is much better for sun's observation and the left one for astronomy. So both are used equally.

Andre.

#4 Asbytec

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 04:37 AM

Andre, I think that's the answer. Use them both. I suspect my dominate left eye is a bit sharper, but my right eye perceives better color. Just an impression at this point.

But, thank you, the NEB is really awash with lights and darks. Its really hard to pin down some exact shapes of the fainter detail, just give a general impression.

#5 Andrev

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 04:56 AM

Norme.

You are right, my right eye see better contrast in Halpha observation while my left eye see better details in night time. Weird but its true.

Andre.

#6 Asbytec

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 07:03 AM

Weird! Okay... Well, Andre, we're weird. :lol:

#7 Special Ed

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 09:07 AM

Norme,

All the practice you're getting with this string of Jupiter observations is certainly reflected in your current sketch--excellent work.

As far as contrast--the original sketch is faithful to the eyepiece view although at times the ep view can briefly look as contrasty as the second version if one has been collecting photons long enough and the seeing snaps in momentarily.

It can also be useful to increase the contrast in order to emphasize certain features. For instance, the turbulence in the NEB is much more noticeable in the second version.

I observe with my left (dominant) eye most of the time although my right eye has fewer floaters. If I switch eyes I have to refocus.

#8 Jef De Wit

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 09:43 AM

Which appears best on your monitor?

The first looks the most realistic, the second gives the most contrast... so difficult to choose.

#9 frank5817

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 11:18 AM

Norme,

The blue shows up better in the first and the contrast is better in the second. Beautiful sketching.
Your experience and persistence pays off. You see more subtle detail than I do. I don't like to use filters but without the filters the contrast is weaker most of the time unless I spend a long period just looking before sketching. It's too cold here for that however.
Great Jupiter sketching.
Frank :)

#10 Asbytec

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 11:59 AM

Guys, thanks for chiming in. Yea, this is only my second season with Jupiter. I tell ya, sketching must improve observing skills. That and there is so much to see.

Michael, yea, it's always a balance with being true to the view and enhancing some contrast. Some of those features are very challenging. We probably don't want someone looking at our sketch to work as hard to see it. :lol:

Jeff, I agree. The first is more true, the latter is a bit dark (but that can be fixed.) I think I'll just work on making the original more like the first and just do a better job of getting it right.

Frank, that's true, too. The colors in the first are more accurate. Really, I have been pushing my scope and myself very hard. I really want to squeeze everything from Jupiter that it will give up. Especially not wasting a second of really good seeing. The difference between 7/10 with calm moments and 8 or 9/10 with more frequent and longer calm periods is absolutely remarkable. At 7/10 or less, it's so hard to see those things that are pretty evident at 8 or 9/10. And even more is visible. So, a lot of it is very much seeing related.

Yea, filters, well, I prefer the eye. I guess they work for some folks, and maybe better filters are better than the cheapos I have. And you're right, observing for a bit before sketching does seem to help.

Tonight I tried a new technique. The GRS was rounding the bend, but I wanted to sketch it on the meridian to capture the wake before and after. It was gonna be a chore, cuz there is a lot to observe. And that takes precious time.

So, the idea dawned to just get ahead of the curve, and go ahead and place the GRS on the meridian even though it was on the trailing limb. This allowed some time to really observe the leading wake and sketch it approaching the preceding limb before it even got to the meridian. As the GRS progressed and detail became visible, fill it in. Then fill in the rest of the planet as it rotates into view.

Now, of course you have to place other features from where they are to where they should be in relation to the GRS on the meridian. That might be tricky, but it seemed to work. The benefit is, by the time the GRS is on the meridian, the sketch is almost done. And really, there seems to be more time to observe and re-observe as needed. This allows time to go deeper into Jupiter's features.

But, the catch is, man it takes a longer time to sketch. You have to wait until the GRS actually makes it to the meridian, double check everything and fill in what's missing. A sketch took nearly an hour and a half tonight, about double the normal 40 minutes give or take. It was such an intense session, my coffee got cold. Never touched it.

How long do you guys spend sketching? Just curious. Normally it takes me about 40 minutes, sometimes an hour. That's just the rough sketch and notes...on paper. The PC paint goes pretty quick, depending on the level of care.

#11 niteskystargazer

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 04:40 PM

Norme,

Nice sketches of Jupiter :).

CS,KLU,

:thanx:,

Tom

#12 Asbytec

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 05:08 PM

Thank you, Tom.






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