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Second Leica Vario 25x-50x ASPH Zoom In the House

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#26 Bob S.

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:26 AM

Andreas, The 7.3-22mm Leica Vario Zooms showed up today from APM with the 1.25" adapters. I put them together and your were correct, I am able to merge the image even with my rather small IPD. It was forecast to be clear tonight but was raining an hour ago. Must be the new equipment curse.

I will let you and everyone know how they work when the skies clear.

Bob


Bob, you are scaring me! My IPD is also too narrow to binoview eyepieces like Pentax XW and I have been happily cruising along with my Pans and Brandons.

I'm not sure I really want to know what you think of the Leica Varios. It could be expensive. :tonofbricks:

Cheers,

Ron


Fellow Pin Heads: The results are in from this morning's viewing session and it is not favorable for us narrow-eyed folks. I too cannot use Pentax XW's due to a 56mm IPD. With the Leica Vario 20x-60x zooms this morning. I could merge the image at the lowest power settings but could not merge the image at the high power settings. I guesstimate that you probably need at least 60mm or better to be able to use the full range of these zooms. I also couldn't get the images to merge in my 2" Sieberts. The eyepieces were close enough together but the combination of my physiology with the zooms was not a good match.

I also attempted to use the ASPH's in the 2" Siebert and it too was a no go. It is a shame that God gave me such a pin head. My wife commented this morning that she is wall-eyed. Maybe I will use her as a surrogate observer for my BV/zoom sessions :lol: "Tell me what your seeing honey. How does the Great Red Spot look tonight?" Sheesh. Guess they will be up for sale shortly <sob>. Bob


Bob, don't give up too soon!

First, you could try to generally use the 22-7.3mm zooms barlowed. This would enable using short focal lengths with their long focal lengths settings where you still can merge the images.

Second, you could mechanically modify the zoom's adapters to enable the zooms getting closer together.

Third, you could convert the eyecups into narrower ones as described here for the ASPHs.

Or a mixture of all three modifications. I'm still hopeful that you could find a satisfying solution.

Andreas


Andreas, Too much added complexity for the experience. As they say here in Florida, "The juice isn't worth the squeeze". I like things fairly simple and to add more glass and more complexity seems to defeat the purpose of the zooms which is to have multiple focal lengths in one set of ep's. My darn IPD has been a stumbling block for binoviewing since day one. I have to carefully choose ep's that work with my narrow IPD. I had collected pairs of Pentax XW's only to find that my IPD would not allow the images to merge. It was a sad day because I really like those ep's. I am envious of others that do not have similar restrictions. At this point, I will remain satisfied with my 24mm Pans and 18mm BGAO's along with pairs of Brandon flat tops. It was a fun experiment. Not all experiments end in success but the attempts are always interesting. Bob

#27 andydj5xp

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 08:54 AM

Andreas, Too much added complexity for the experience. As they say here in Florida, "The juice isn't worth the squeeze". I like things fairly simple and to add more glass and more complexity seems to defeat the purpose of the zooms which is to have multiple focal lengths in one set of ep's. My darn IPD has been a stumbling block for binoviewing since day one. I have to carefully choose ep's that work with my narrow IPD. I had collected pairs of Pentax XW's only to find that my IPD would not allow the images to merge. It was a sad day because I really like those ep's. I am envious of others that do not have similar restrictions. At this point, I will remain satisfied with my 24mm Pans and 18mm BGAO's along with pairs of Brandon flat tops. It was a fun experiment. Not all experiments end in success but the attempts are always interesting. Bob



Bob, I fully understand and I'm sorry for you. But the earth will continue to smoothly move around the sun even without binoviewing with zooms :).

At least the ASPH will comfort you with tremendous performance in mono-mode.

Andreas

#28 RAKing

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:06 AM

It was a fun experiment. Not all experiments end in success but the attempts are always interesting. Bob


Bob,

My Dad always told me that I would learn more if I failed a few experiments before reaching success than if I simply succeded the first time. It's true, but can be doggone expensive at times. :p

Like you, I have learned to live quite happily with my Pans and Brandons. I recently tried a pair of Kasai AP eyepieces and they worked very well.

A narrow IPD doesn't mean a narrow mind. :cool:

Cheers,

Ron

#29 Bob S.

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 02:18 PM

Ron and Andreas, All is not lost! One of my beautiful new Leica zooms was quickly spoken for and had been put back in its box. I was thinking about what I might do with the second zoom and then it hit me like a sledge hammer. Because of the qualities of the optic and variable 3x zoom and FOV, I got to thinking that if I could not use them for binoviewing due to a too small IPD, I could use the zoom monocularly in my Lunt solar scope.

Well, the qualities that caused Andreas many years ago to go with the Leica zooms expressed itself in the use of my remaining zoom on the Sun this afternoon. I could not detect any internal reflections and the amount of detail on Sol was amazing since it is very active right now. The zoom turned out to be perfect for any magnification that I wanted to use and could get the entire disk in the FOV easily at the 7.3mm position. I do not think that I have ever looked through a finer solar eyepiece as the Leica was presenting this afternoon. It was a wonderful but expected surprise. The only way you could get this second zoom from me would be to pry it from my cold stiff fingers<g>. In other words, it is fantastic for monocular solar work. The level of detail seen and the inky black background without any ghosting was to die for. Well, I am very surprised that I recovered from the first experiment so quickly only to find a perfect use for my second Leica Vario zoom. Here in the USA, tomorrow is a tradition we call Thanksgiving. I can assure all that I am VERY thankful that Andreas sent many of us down this path. This different zoom than my ASPH is perfect for my newfound application. Bob

#30 andydj5xp

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 04:18 PM

Ron and Andreas, All is not lost! One of my beautiful new Leica zooms was quickly spoken for and had been put back in its box. I was thinking about what I might do with the second zoom and then it hit me like a sledge hammer. Because of the qualities of the optic and variable 3x zoom and FOV, I got to thinking that if I could not use them for binoviewing due to a too small IPD, I could use the zoom monocularly in my Lunt solar scope.

Well, the qualities that caused Andreas many years ago to go with the Leica zooms expressed itself in the use of my remaining zoom on the Sun this afternoon. I could not detect any internal reflections and the amount of detail on Sol was amazing since it is very active right now. The zoom turned out to be perfect for any magnification that I wanted to use and could get the entire disk in the FOV easily at the 7.3mm position. I do not think that I have ever looked through a finer solar eyepiece as the Leica was presenting this afternoon. It was a wonderful but expected surprise. The only way you could get this second zoom from me would be to pry it from my cold stiff fingers<g>. In other words, it is fantastic for monocular solar work. The level of detail seen and the inky black background without any ghosting was to die for. Well, I am very surprised that I recovered from the first experiment so quickly only to find a perfect use for my second Leica Vario zoom. Here in the USA, tomorrow is a tradition we call Thanksgiving. I can assure all that I am VERY thankful that Andreas sent many of us down this path. This different zoom than my ASPH is perfect for my newfound application. Bob


Bob, you know what I've been thinking? He will think twice before completely abandon the 22-7.3mm Leica zooms. May be there is a solution. And there it is! Congrats to your new solar observation tool.

As you can see from my signature I'm also active in solar viewing with the ASPH zoom (barlowed 1.5x to give 82.5x to 165x). Absolutely stunning views.

Thanks for your kind words about Thanksgiving which I'm really appreciating.

Andreas

#31 Bob S.

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 04:40 PM

Ron and Andreas, All is not lost! One of my beautiful new Leica zooms was quickly spoken for and had been put back in its box. I was thinking about what I might do with the second zoom and then it hit me like a sledge hammer. Because of the qualities of the optic and variable 3x zoom and FOV, I got to thinking that if I could not use them for binoviewing due to a too small IPD, I could use the zoom monocularly in my Lunt solar scope.

Well, the qualities that caused Andreas many years ago to go with the Leica zooms expressed itself in the use of my remaining zoom on the Sun this afternoon. I could not detect any internal reflections and the amount of detail on Sol was amazing since it is very active right now. The zoom turned out to be perfect for any magnification that I wanted to use and could get the entire disk in the FOV easily at the 7.3mm position. I do not think that I have ever looked through a finer solar eyepiece as the Leica was presenting this afternoon. It was a wonderful but expected surprise. The only way you could get this second zoom from me would be to pry it from my cold stiff fingers<g>. In other words, it is fantastic for monocular solar work. The level of detail seen and the inky black background without any ghosting was to die for. Well, I am very surprised that I recovered from the first experiment so quickly only to find a perfect use for my second Leica Vario zoom. Here in the USA, tomorrow is a tradition we call Thanksgiving. I can assure all that I am VERY thankful that Andreas sent many of us down this path. This different zoom than my ASPH is perfect for my newfound application. Bob


Bob, you know what I've been thinking? He will think twice before completely abandon the 22-7.3mm Leica zooms. May be there is a solution. And there it is! Congrats to your new solar observation tool.

As you can see from my signature I'm also active in solar viewing with the ASPH zoom (barlowed 1.5x to give 82.5x to 165x). Absolutely stunning views.

Thanks for your kind words about Thanksgiving which I'm really appreciating.

Andreas


Andreas, Our thinking is very much alike on the solar front. I use my Leica ASPH in the 2" mode with my Baader Ceramic Herschel Solar Wedge to tease out very fine sunspot detail with it attached to my TEC 160. The Leica Vario 7.3-22mm is quite a complimentary piece in the Lunt 60 which shows me different detail in the H-alpha band than the Wedge provides. Bob

#32 Doug D.

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 03:22 AM

As much as I like my ASPH zoom I have to say I was not particularly impressed with my first views with it through my Solarscope/TV76 rig. I guess I should give it another try.... maybe tomorrow after the turkey goes in the oven and if the weather cooperates.

Thanks for all the enthusiastic reports in this thread, no question that it is one fine zoom.

#33 andydj5xp

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 04:36 AM

As much as I like my ASPH zoom I have to say I was not particularly impressed with my first views with it through my Solarscope/TV76 rig. I guess I should give it another try.... maybe tomorrow after the turkey goes in the oven and if the weather cooperates.

Thanks for all the enthusiastic reports in this thread, no question that it is one fine zoom.


I can't comment on your solar rig. But what I can report is the absolutely stunning performance of the ASPH zoom in the combo TEC140/Baader_Herschel_wedge/SolarContinuum.

Extremely high contrast with a deep black sky around the solar disk. With sufficiently clear skies the approaching sun from outside the field of view will not be noticed before entering the the field of view. And the field stop can only be seen where it cuts through the solar disk: WOW, the sky is as black as the field stop! Just impressive.

Comparable with the ZAOIIs where the approaching solar disk can be seen already in the triangular cut-outs while within the field of view no hint can be noticed.

This high contrast transfer results in accordingly high contrast details on the solar surface.

Andreas

#34 Bob S.

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 05:02 AM

As much as I like my ASPH zoom I have to say I was not particularly impressed with my first views with it through my Solarscope/TV76 rig. I guess I should give it another try.... maybe tomorrow after the turkey goes in the oven and if the weather cooperates.

Thanks for all the enthusiastic reports in this thread, no question that it is one fine zoom.


Doug, Andreas experience above mimics the one I have been having using he ASPH with the Herschel Wedge and Continuum Filter of the Baader rig. You have to remember that Andreas is using a 140mm scope and I am using a 160mm scope to view the sun. The light throughput likely has a lot to do with how much of the percept comes through the blocking filters and how the eyepiece shows the image.

As I had mentioned earlier and with only one viewing experience, the Leica zoom predecessor to the ASPH is exhibiting the same characteristics of a severe lack of ghosting and inky black backgrounds when viewing the Sun in my Lunt 60mm Ha solar scope. Of course the Lunt is known for having pretty black backgrounds compared to some other solar filters but the Leica 3x Vario zoom seems to up the ante? Bob

#35 Bob S.

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 04:52 PM

Andreas, The Sun continues to be quite active and so this morning, I took out my TEC 160FL, put it on a DM6 alt/az mount and plugged in my Baader Ceramic Herschel Wedge with my Leica ASPH in the wedge. I had been earlier viewing the star with my 60mm Lunt Ha scope and the Leica Vario 3x zoom and could see where there may have been many sunspots. With the Herschel wedge, I counted 33 with the Leica ASPH being zoomed at different magnifications dependending on the seeing conditions. The detail surrounding the sunspots was truly spectacular with the solar continuum filter in place. It has gotten to the point where I really like looking at the Sun as a large lime-green object. It took a bit of getting used to the color of the continuum filter but now it is very "normal". The ASPH zoom is an ideal ep for this activity and simply locks into place in the Baader click-lock mechanism. What fun to see Sol in two different bandwidths with two different Leica zooms. I feel very spoiled with the views they are producing. Bob

#36 Doug D.

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 06:07 PM

Bob and Andreas, I don't at all disagree about the ASPH performance with the Baader Herschel and continuum (I also have a Baader UV/IR filter sandwiched in mine). When paired with my AP 140 the wedge and ASPH are indeed quite stunning together and yes, the extra aperture helps as well ;)

However, I was responding specifically to the comment about the Lunt 60 and h-alpha. The performance of the zoom in h-alpha is excellent with great contrast and internal reflections well controlled. I just didn't recall feeling the wow factor you described relative to my ZAO II's, Zeiss microscope eps. or the Tak LEs I use as my standard reference h-alpha eps (i.e., I didn't feel ready to give up any of them for the ASPH alone). The Solarscope SF70 is where I get my wow factor from....! Nevertheless, you two have inspired me to take the Leica ASPH out again for a careful side by side (couldn't manage it today). One difference may be that I now binoview with pairs of the eps I just mentioned - but I only have a single ASPH. So, I will now compare everything in cyclops mode.

I'm pretty sure that I have the required IPD to make a pair of the ASPHs work in a MarkV but I've been very hesitant to take the plunge. Oddly enough, another Starlight Inst. adapter gives me pause.... those things aren't exactly cheap. They are a nice design though, thanks to Tammy.

#37 andydj5xp

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 03:29 AM

Andreas, The Sun continues to be quite active and so this morning, I took out my TEC 160FL, put it on a DM6 alt/az mount and plugged in my Baader Ceramic Herschel Wedge with my Leica ASPH in the wedge. I had been earlier viewing the star with my 60mm Lunt Ha scope and the Leica Vario 3x zoom and could see where there may have been many sunspots. With the Herschel wedge, I counted 33 with the Leica ASPH being zoomed at different magnifications dependending on the seeing conditions. The detail surrounding the sunspots was truly spectacular with the solar continuum filter in place. It has gotten to the point where I really like looking at the Sun as a large lime-green object. It took a bit of getting used to the color of the continuum filter but now it is very "normal". The ASPH zoom is an ideal ep for this activity and simply locks into place in the Baader click-lock mechanism. What fun to see Sol in two different bandwidths with two different Leica zooms. I feel very spoiled with the views they are producing. Bob


Bob, you are right with the solarcontinuum filter. It really takes only a short period of time to get used to the "green" sun.

I have been one of the first users of this filter (IIRC in 2003?) immediately after the first announcement from Baader had been made. There was a detailed discussion on the German astronomy forum with participation also of people from Baader. In particular there was a plausible explanation for choosing just 540nm as the passband wave length.

I have the "old" Baader Herschel wedge incorporating the T2 part #17 as 2" eyepiece holder. This eyepiece holder is about 8mm longer than the 2" clicklock holder thus enabling the use of the 1.5x barlowed ASPH without a separate barlow housing. The resulting mags of 82x to 164x with the TEC140 are very useful for solar observations.

@ Doug: your statement "I just didn't recall feeling the wow factor you described relative to my ZAO II's, Zeiss microscope eps. or the Tak LEs I use as my standard reference h-alpha eps (i.e., I didn't feel ready to give up any of them for the ASPH alone)" could also be interpreted as "the Leica didn't loose against the mentioned fixed focal length eyepieces". This would be compliment enough for such a complex eyepiece like the ASPH zoom.

Andreas

#38 Doug D.

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 07:40 AM

You are exactly right Andreas - the ASPH didn't lose much if anything against the other premium eyepieces in h-alpha. That is an important point.

I'm not sure I'd be ready anytime soon to give up the ZAO II's in lieu of the Leica. But what I can say is that on a few nights of dark and steady skies I have simply experienced the best planetary views of my life with the AP 140, Mark V and ZAO IIs. While I haven't done a proper comparison with the ASPH as you have, it would be hard to part with the Zeiss glass given my now emotional attachment, LOL. But maybe a second ASPH zoom......?

Why do I read these forums?? :grin:

#39 Bob S.

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 08:54 AM

You are exactly right Andreas - the ASPH didn't lose much if anything against the other premium eyepieces in h-alpha. That is an important point.

I'm not sure I'd be ready anytime soon to give up the ZAO II's in lieu of the Leica. But what I can say is that on a few nights of dark and steady skies I have simply experienced the best planetary views of my life with the AP 140, Mark V and ZAO IIs. While I haven't done a proper comparison with the ASPH as you have, it would be hard to part with the Zeiss glass given my now emotional attachment, LOL. But maybe a second ASPH zoom......?

Why do I read these forums?? :grin:

Doug, I tend to be somewhat of an impulse buyer and when I saw the views of Saturn at the Golden State Star Party this year in a friend's TEC 180FL with ZAOII's and other orthos and ep's for comparison, I immediately found pairs of ZAOII's as well as the 4&6mm ZAO's along with the Zeiss barlow. The views through the ZAO's were as pure as anything I have ever seen in my TEC 160FL.

I was very skeptical about the Leica ASPH being able to even come close to the Zeiss glass in performance until I got one. In side-by-side comparisons, there was no appreciable difference to my eyes between the two eyepieces. In fact, there was a very minor edge in snap-to-focus of the Leica over the Zeiss in my TEC. That coupled with the wider FOV and ability to zoom in at precisely the right magnification for the conditions fully sold me on the Leica zoom. Sadly, after having sold the ZAO pairs, I find that there likely is nothing finer than ZAO's in binoviewing pairs in the Mark V. However, at this point, I had to decide if the significant investment could be justified? I began to worry about dropping one of the Zeiss jewels and then having a very difficult time replacing the damaged ep.

From a monocular standpoint, it feels like the ASPH does not have a peer in all around performance? Last night, I spent about 1.5 hours at the end of a long observing session comparing the views of Jupiter with the TEC and a 12.5" f/5 Zambuto-mirrored Newtonian with my two ASPH's. It was very interesting in comparing what can be seen in two scopes that are about 2x difference in aperature. Bob

#40 andydj5xp

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 09:14 AM

You are exactly right Andreas - the ASPH didn't lose much if anything against the other premium eyepieces in h-alpha. That is an important point.

I'm not sure I'd be ready anytime soon to give up the ZAO II's in lieu of the Leica. But what I can say is that on a few nights of dark and steady skies I have simply experienced the best planetary views of my life with the AP 140, Mark V and ZAO IIs. While I haven't done a proper comparison with the ASPH as you have, it would be hard to part with the Zeiss glass given my now emotional attachment, LOL. But maybe a second ASPH zoom......?

Why do I read these forums?? :grin:


Doug, I can't comment on binoviewing because I'm unfortunately not able to effectively observe stereoscopically. But from serious reports here on CN I've learned that two very good eyepieces in a binoviewer will be better than any eyepiece in cyclops mode.

Now putting two Leica zooms into a binoviewer would raise the monomode views of the Leica - which are to my best knowledge as good or even ever so slightly better than the ZAOIIs - to the next level: "The Leica bino-level". In addition they would result in a major step-up in comfort (zooming facility, large AFOV, comfortable eye relief). And exactly this was the - unfortunately not accessible - goal of Bob.

Andreas

#41 Bob S.

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 11:32 AM

Doug and Andreas, This morning at 11 a.m. local East Coast time, with my TEC 160 and Baader Wedge along with the ASPH I counted 68 seperate black spots on the surface of the sun. That is is the most I have ever seen to date. I was using the combo ND3 and Solar Continuum filters in the Herschel Wedge. The seeing has been really excellent here lately and that combined with the ability to zoom to just the right magnification allowed for some very finely detailed views of the sunspot activity.

#42 Doug D.

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 02:08 PM

I really enjoy your (Bob and Andreas) experiences with the Leica ASPH. If I can scrape together the money I guess I'm just going to have to try binoviewing with the zoom to make a proper comparison to the ZAO IIs in the MarkVs. All in the interest of science and our hobby, of course.

Weather not ideal here, peeking through wispy clouds but based on what I'm seeing in h-alpha, I don't doubt your white light sunspot count Bob.

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#43 ThomasM

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 02:46 PM

I really enjoy your (Bob and Andreas) experiences with the Leica ASPH. If I can scrape together the money I guess I'm just going to have to try binoviewing with the zoom to make a proper comparison to the ZAO IIs in the MarkVs. All in the interest of science and our hobby, of course.



If you interpupil seperation is bigger than 63 mm I can really recommend the Leica Aspherical Zoom for binowing. Here is a picture,

http://www.cloudynig.../Number/4986505

scroll dwond to the end of the tread # 4993635.

Following Andreas advice I removed the rubber eyeshield.

Thomas

#44 Doug D.

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 02:53 PM

Thanks Thomas, that is an impressive bino rig, 160mm and independent focusers! :bigshock:

If I'm measuring correctly, my IPD is more like 73mm so I think I should be comfortable with a pair of the ASPH.

#45 RAKing

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 03:29 PM

Hmmmmmmmmm..... You live in Virginia and I live in Virginia. Maybe we can work something so I could loan my ASPH to you to try.

I love my Leica zoom, but I also love my Mark V binos. My IPD is no where near wide enough for the Leica to work, so it's been relegated to the sidelines for now. The biggest hassle is I only have the 2 inch adapter.

Just a thought,

Ron

#46 Doug D.

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 07:42 PM

That is a generous offer Ron - I'm in Charlottesville but the problem is more one of finding the time, especially this time of year. I am thinking of picking up another Starlight adapter in advance of getting a second zoom - they are easily converted to 1.25 inch by screwing in a Badder 1.25" nosepiece via T-thread. Last time I talked to those folks they told me they had only made a very few and were thinking of a simpler less expensive design if making another run - I wouldn't want to be caught in a situation where I can't get the same adapter to match my existing zoom.

I agree with you about the Mark Vs - it isn't that I don't enjoy using the Leica zoom, its just that I pretty much only binoview these days so the zoom rarely comes out of the ep box. I have been using it mostly for terrestrial viewing with a Baader amici and TV85 but I'm now trying to sell the latter (and might consider a Televid down the road to replace it). Talk about your great performance on birds....

#47 Bob S.

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 10:36 PM

Doug, I am going to seriously hurt your wallet. I was able to just barely merge the views of Jupiter tonight in my TEC 160 with the Siebert Elite 2" binoviewers and my pair of Leica ASPH's. The views were BEAUTIFUL! I could only take in a portion of the FOV but the planet when the seeing was steady was showing a lovely shadow transit of one of the Jovian moons. When I tried zooming a bit, the images would not come close to merging for my narrow-set eyes. When I tried to go back to the least magnification, I had one ep slighlty cocked somehow and merging was no longer available. However, for those brief few minutes, all of the qualities of the Leica were coming through but to both eyes simultaneously. Highly recommended if you can merge them.

On another front, for us more challenged folks wanting to use 2" ep's in our Siebert Elite BV's, my new 20mm Nagler T5's were to die for. Views of the Double Cluster, Pleides, Moon and Jupiter were all very, very nice. Bob

#48 Doug D.

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 01:14 AM

Yes, I suppose resistance is ultimately futile, you've just reignited a dormant interest in trying a pair of them out for myself. I must say, your description of tonight's view of Jupiter is very encouraging. Sky is boiling a bit too much here tonight, unfortunately.

#49 RAKing

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 06:54 AM

On another front, for us more challenged folks wanting to use 2" ep's in our Siebert Elite BV's, my new 20mm Nagler T5's were to die for. Views of the Double Cluster, Pleides, Moon and Jupiter were all very, very nice. Bob


Ouch! My wallet just kicked me in the rear and my piggy bank keeled over! :roflmao:

Sounds like you have a great combination. Too bad the Leica doesn't scratch that itch too, but then it might be considered the "perfect" eyepiece and that is a very hard goal to attain.

I'm sure Siebert's waiting list just grew a few years longer from people following this thread. :p

Ron

#50 RAKing

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 07:04 AM

That is a generous offer Ron - I'm in Charlottesville but the problem is more one of finding the time, especially this time of year. I am thinking of picking up another Starlight adapter in advance of getting a second zoom - they are easily converted to 1.25 inch by screwing in a Badder 1.25" nosepiece via T-thread. Last time I talked to those folks they told me they had only made a very few and were thinking of a simpler less expensive design if making another run - I wouldn't want to be caught in a situation where I can't get the same adapter to match my existing zoom.

I agree with you about the Mark Vs - it isn't that I don't enjoy using the Leica zoom, its just that I pretty much only binoview these days so the zoom rarely comes out of the ep box. I have been using it mostly for terrestrial viewing with a Baader amici and TV85 but I'm now trying to sell the latter (and might consider a Televid down the road to replace it). Talk about your great performance on birds....


No problem, Doug. If something changes, just let me know.

I am also locked in that same dilemma. I went out last night without the binos and tried monoviewing only. The results were not as good for me as with my binos, so I am going to have to juggle both sets of gear in the future. I hate doing that, but the views are too beautiful to miss and I cannot afford to waste a night!

Cheers,

Ron






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