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"Historical" huge find Curiosity Just Made on Mars

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#26 InterStellarGuy

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:05 PM

This makes no sense. If they can't tell us yet then what is the point in coming out and saying they have something even?


I agree completely. Now it has to be really big or there is going to be Martian egg on some faces.


egg-zactly. At this point I am expecting something related to life on Mars, an something beyond just finding organic compounds in Martian soil, (organics have been found in meteors etc...so fining them on Mars to me wouldn't be that historic), anything short of that, to me anyway, will be a let down.

#27 Joad

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:45 PM

I think I'm seeing what the excitement is about. That NASA image looks suspiciously like a blueberry garnished cinnamon cake. I do believe that they have discovered the leftovers of Zaphod Beeblebrock's breakfast.

#28 BillFerris

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 07:47 PM

Jimmy Hoffa

Bill in Flag


The Holy Grail?

Dave Mitsky


Amelia Earhart?

#29 StarWars

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Posted 21 November 2012 - 11:50 PM

This makes no sense. If they can't tell us yet then what is the point in coming out and saying they have something even?



JPL/NASA are required to get clearance from a higher authority when releasing information which could affect national security... :o

If the MSL did find some sort of fossilized life form we may never hear about it. :(

#30 Jason H.

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:51 AM

... I just hope this isn't like Kepler's anticlimatic "huge" announcement back in 2011 when everyone was anticipating they found Earth 2, and then it turned out to be Keplers first multiplanet system or some such.


That one actually was quite a big deal,

http://www.nasa.gov/...kepler-16b.html

Kepler-16: A Transiting Circumbinary Planet
http://arxiv.org/abs/1109.3432

It was the first detection of a planet in a stable orbit (on the order of at least millions of years) around a binary star system. The significance of that discovery cannot be overstated IMO.

1. For a very long time in Astronomy the modelers were against this being possible, as they speculated that planets would be tossed out of binary star systems. Some important planet searchers were actually excluding binary systems from searches, in 2005 a top planet searcher Michel Mayor said "A few years ago, it was thought that [binaries] were a very bad site to search for planets," says Michel Mayor of the Observatoire de Geneve. "So we carefully eliminated all binary stars from our sample." Imagine that.

2. Binary star systems probably make up at least 1/3rd to more than half of our galaxy's star systems (i.e. IN ONE ANNOUNCEMENT THE POSSIBLE REAL ESTATE MAY HAVE DOUBLED.) Additionally, it's likely based on research done so far that planets will form from the same accretion disk as the binary system, so that now for many of the eclipsing binaries we see (especially those not in the Kepler sample), detection of planets in eclipsing binary systems using the transit method may be more likely (as the planets are orbiting in the same plane as the eclipsing binary stars, relative to us.)

3. Probably of great significance too, variations in the periodicity of the easier-to-detect planets relative to the binary star periodicities will give away sub-Earth mass planets and even moons!!! That's 'huge'.

Regards, Jason W. Higley

#31 star drop

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 08:59 AM

Arsenic based life forms? Absentee voting ballots? Alan Shepard's golf balls? Stefanyshyn-Piper's tool bag? BP tarballs? ES 25mm 100° eyepiece? Fossilized fruitcake?

#32 Qwickdraw

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 08:59 AM

[quote name="Joad"][quote]

I agree completely. Now it has to be really big or there is going to be Martian egg on some faces. [/quote]

Faces or Feces? :grin:

#33 Kon Dealer

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 10:30 AM

Sure look like rabbit droppings to me.
Houda thought, Martian bunnies? :roflmao:

#34 Andy Taylor

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 10:39 AM

Road kill - maybe Curiosity squashed the first alien life form ever found...

#35 Qwickdraw

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 11:30 AM

Sure look like rabbit droppings to me.
Houda thought, Martian bunnies? :roflmao:


Feces on Mars

#36 Mister T

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:38 PM

8 legs and green guts squished between the treads ....
:ranting: watch where you going bub!!

#37 Radom

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 02:50 PM

8 legs and green guts squished between the treads ....


And so, with their name spelled out in Morse code up its back, would that make it proprietary to JPL?? :roflmao:

#38 Jason H.

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 03:46 PM

Sure look like rabbit droppings to me.
Houda thought, Martian bunnies? :roflmao:


One may remember this from the Mars rover Opportunity

Posted Image

:lol:

Jason H.

#39 Otto Piechowski

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 10:22 PM

What is the SAM designed to detect?

What is the SAM capable of detecting?

#40 Jason H.

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 10:32 PM

What is the SAM designed to detect?

What is the SAM capable of detecting?


Here's a link to info on SAM.



#41 StarWars

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 12:19 AM


Breaking News!!


Curiosity found some debris from the Mars Global Surveyor Orbiter.. :hamsterdance:


Case Closed.... :bawling:


Good night Chet. Good night David..... :sleepy:






#42 Andy Taylor

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 03:44 AM

8 legs and green guts squished between the treads ....


Aww! I was hoping for tentacles. :(

#43 Mister T

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 09:35 AM

Squids have Tentacles

Octopi have Eighticles :jump:

#44 BillFerris

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 11:58 AM

8 legs and green guts squished between the treads ....
:ranting: watch where you going bub!!


To paraphrase one of the great lines from John Carpenter's The Thing, I dunno what's in the sand, but it's weird and hacked off, whatever it is.

Bill in Flag

#45 Footbag

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 04:26 PM

OK. Pure speculation here, so take it FWIW...
The experiment was with the SAM, so best case scenario, they discovered a microbe. More realistically, it is either basic organic molecules or methane. I'm thinking it is methane, and here's why... The SAM did it's first test and kept the partial sample for further testing. But it's now on the move.

I remember reading that in the past when they got potential methane in a sample, they decided to let the sample air out in the atmosphere and the methane disappeared. I'm thinking this is what they are doing right now. Seeing if the methane dissipates.

If it doesn't dissipate, then I believe they will announce the discovery of methane.

Had they discovered an organinc molecule, they wouldn't have moved the rover. They probably would've wanted to test the soil around the original sample.

#46 InterStellarGuy

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Posted 23 November 2012 - 04:35 PM

Well it looks like JPL is throwing cold water on this even before it's announced:
here



"JPL spokesman Guy Webster made just this point today in an e-mail to TIME: “As for history books, the whole mission is for the history books,” he wrote. That’s not to say he rules out the possibility of truly big news. “It won’t be earthshaking,” he said in a later phone call, “but it will be interesting.”

Read more: http://science.time....story-books/...

#47 Qwickdraw

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 06:24 AM

To me the absence of any biological trace is just as important and is "historical"

I know it may be anti climatic to many but the implications are never the less just as profound.

#48 Rick Woods

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 12:37 AM

This makes no sense. If they can't tell us yet then what is the point in coming out and saying they have something even?


I agree completely. Now it has to be really big or there is going to be Martian egg on some faces.


egg-zactly. At this point I am expecting something related to life on Mars, an something beyond just finding organic compounds in Martian soil, (organics have been found in meteors etc...so fining them on Mars to me wouldn't be that historic), anything short of that, to me anyway, will be a let down.


The yolk's on us. I'm betting Curiosity and Opportunity collided. :foreheadslap:

#49 Qwickdraw

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 07:15 AM

This makes no sense. If they can't tell us yet then what is the point in coming out and saying they have something even?


I agree completely. Now it has to be really big or there is going to be Martian egg on some faces.


egg-zactly. At this point I am expecting something related to life on Mars, an something beyond just finding organic compounds in Martian soil, (organics have been found in meteors etc...so fining them on Mars to me wouldn't be that historic), anything short of that, to me anyway, will be a let down.


The yolk's on us. I'm betting Curiosity and Opportunity collided. :foreheadslap:


First stoplight on Mars scheduled for launch in 2015

#50 StarWars

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 12:28 PM






Curiosity found the Sky Crane.... And it's in perfect shape!! :o

JPL will post on Ebay next week... :D

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