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IS Binocs -- Recommendations?

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#1 Spaced

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 07:04 PM

I'm going to treat myself to a pair of IS binocs and I'm hoping to hear a consensus on recommendations.

Currently I use 8 X 40 Regals, which I like a lot, but more magnification would make me a happy guy. Because of limited upper body strength I want to avoid very large, heavy options.

Thanks in advance!

#2 Rich V.

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 07:18 PM

The Canon 12x36IS II would seem to be a good compromise between weight and magnification. The 15x50 is on the heavy side; 12x will still go a lot deeper than your current 8x binos yet the weight is similar.

The 12x Canon would be my choice for a first IS binocular; it could well be my next binocular (if not a 12x50SE). ;)

Rich

#3 GaryS

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 07:40 PM

I'm going to treat myself to a pair of IS binocs and I'm hoping to hear a consensus on recommendations.

Currently I use 8 X 40 Regals, which I like a lot, but more magnification would make me a happy guy. Because of limited upper body strength I want to avoid very large, heavy options.

Thanks in advance!


I think the 10x30s or 12x36s might be right for you, based on the info you've provided. You might want to check out my review of the entire Canon line on my web site. That way you'll at least get to know the pros and cons of each model.

Regards,
Gary

#4 Plan9

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 08:09 PM

I second the recommendation on the 12x36.

Bill

#5 Aleko

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 08:58 PM

I second the recommendation on the 12x36.

Bill


+1

I love the 12x36s!

Alex

#6 Joad

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 09:36 PM

Still unanimous on the Canon 12X36.

#7 Spaced

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 12:45 AM

Hmmm, I see a consensus in the making here.

Thanks for the tip re. your web site, Gary; I'll check it out.

Edit: I ordered the 12 X 36s. Thanks all for your input!

#8 beachchairbill

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 01:47 AM

My recommendation would hav been the 15x50IS.

I've used it for years and have had no problem with it's weight.

Beachchairbill

#9 daniel_h

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 03:39 AM

I would also recommend 12x36..I really like mine, but you don't mention what you require them for, whether astronomy, birding,general or a combo-if just astro the 15x50 would prob be my pick

#10 gwd

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 05:23 PM

I've gotten a lot of use from the Zeiss 20x60. I've borrowed the Canon 10x30 IS for a few hours each for several sessions and the Canon 15x50 IS once at a ball game. The 10x30 that I borrow has that annoying "image softening" feature when you press the IS button. It isn't consistent so you can press the button again and it might go away. The Canon 15x50 had a nice image but it had a very high frequency "jitter". At the ball game I ended up supporting the bino by placing my elbows on my knees and forgoing the IS feature. The Zeiss with no batteries has a different stabilization system from the Cannons. It seems to eliminate the high frequencies better than the low frequencies- compared to the Cannons. If I hike to an observing spot at a fast pace so I'm breathing hard, at first, the image stabilization doesn't completely eliminate my heartbeat. After I relax a bit the heartbeat effect disappears. I don't notice this when I just walk out to the patio. It also isn't a problem when I walk around the local nature preserve. Last week while driving we stopped to look at some birds. Resting the Zeiss on the partially unrolled car window gave a steady view except for the vibrations from the idling car engine. Pushing the IS button eliminated the car vibrations completely. Lets see 4 cylinders at 1000 rpm makes 4khz doesn't it?
If this bino doesn't violate your weight limit you might want to check it out. Hand held 20x is addictive. I get more frequent use of this than my telescope.

#11 maus

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 03:06 PM

I have the 10x42 IS L and I have to agree with Gary that if you are to own only 1 IS binocular and you can afford it, then this is the one to buy.
It has excellent optics, with and without the IS. With the IS on it is magic.
IMHO.

#12 David E

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 07:46 AM

Hmmm, I see a consensus in the making here.

Thanks for the tip re. your web site, Gary; I'll check it out.

Edit: I ordered the 12 X 36s. Thanks all for your input!

Congrats! :jump: I love my 12x36IS, use them for birding and astronomy too. They're GREAT for astronomy IMHO.






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