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Pluto's Atmosphere

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#1 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 03:10 PM

Pluto may be rather small but it seems to have a very big atmosphere.

http://www.space.com...ere-larger.html

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#2 Qwickdraw

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Posted 28 November 2012 - 05:33 AM

An atomsphere is another reason to give Pluto back its Planet status.

#3 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 02:08 AM

Should Titan and comets then also be considered planets?

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#4 Qwickdraw

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 05:27 AM

Should Titan and comets then also be considered planets?

Dave Mitsky


Absolutely not, Titan is already a satellite which should negate planet status and comets are by definition, comets.

#5 llanitedave

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 10:31 AM

Were any ice planet somehow knocked into an orbit that entered the inner solar system, it would be immediately recognized as a comet.

A very, very large comet.

#6 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 01:04 PM

I don't consider the presence of an atmosphere a necessary requirement for planetary status. Erris apparently does not have one (or at least one that's significant), orbits the Sun, and is similar in size to Pluto.

http://www.nytimes.c...anet-beyond-...

But the new measurements — based on observations from multiple telescopes in different parts of South America — indicate that Makemake, like another dwarf planet, Eris, does not have a significant atmosphere.

Mercury has an almost negligible atmosphere.

http://www.universet...ere-of-mercury/

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#7 Qwickdraw

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 03:16 PM

I don't consider the presence of an atmosphere a necessary requirement for planetary status. Erris apparently does not have one (or at least one that's significant), orbits the Sun, and is similar in size to Pluto.

http://www.nytimes.c...anet-beyond-...

But the new measurements — based on observations from multiple telescopes in different parts of South America — indicate that Makemake, like another dwarf planet, Eris, does not have a significant atmosphere.

Mercury has an almost negligible atmosphere.

http://www.universet...ere-of-mercury/

Dave Mitsky


But both have at least a negligible atmosphere.
An atmosphere is only my opinion one of several planet qualifiers, that is all.

#8 Rick Woods

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 03:56 PM

Should Titan and comets then also be considered planets?

Dave Mitsky


Absolutely not, Titan is already a satellite which should negate planet status and comets are by definition, comets.


Why can't it be both? Earth is a satellite of the sun. I think Titan should definitely be considered a planet.

#9 llanitedave

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 09:48 PM

Atmosphere depends partly on temperature and partly on a planet's unique history. Pluto has an atmosphere that is gaseous near perihelion, and largely frozen onto the surface during much of the rest of its orbit.

Mercury could probably hold on to an atmosphere just fine if it were at Earth's distance. Of course, if Earth were in Pluto's orbit, it wouldn't qualify for the term "planet" either.

Presence or absence of an atmosphere doesn't, and shouldn't, determine whether a body is called a planet.

#10 opticsguy

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Posted 02 December 2012 - 09:54 AM

Neptune can't be a planet because it has not yet cleared its orbit of debris (Pluto). Pluto is obviously a not a " normal" planet. Titan would be a planet if it had its own orbit. Would be pretty cool if we could move Titan to the asteroid belt. It would clean up that dirty area of the solar system, grow larger and with an atomsphere and a portable space heater we could be living there. :-)

#11 Rick Woods

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Posted 03 December 2012 - 05:48 PM

The methane content of the atmosphere probably wouldn't be any higher than in many places where cheap Mexican food is popular.

#12 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 02:36 PM

Our Moon has an 'atmosphere' of sorts, albeit extremely tenuous. Most any body can generate something resembling an atmosphere, by one process or another, and especially if near enough to the Sun.

#13 Pess

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 03:22 PM

Since Pluto has an atmosphere that comes and goes it is sometimes a planet and sometimes not....

Pesse (..good as any explanation and makes both sides of the arguement happy 50% of the time) Mist

#14 Mister T

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 09:27 PM

I generate my own atmosphere every day :crazy:






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