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(Faster)ccddrift using backyard eos for astrotrac?

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#1 Moey

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Posted 29 November 2012 - 11:33 PM

Was wondering, rather than using the ccd drift method for polar aligning astrotrac (image for 2 minutes, 1 minute forward next minute rewind), would it be quicker to do this using backyard eos illuminated reticle screen feature? As in, rather than take an image, do fast drift for 1 minute than reverse it while watching the star drift on the screen and make adjustments live while viewing it?

Hope I make sense :foreheadslap:

#2 guyroch

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 12:36 AM

Yep, that should work, in fact a have several users doing it as you described it :)

The difficult part with an astrotrac is the ability to center the star smack in the middle where the crosshairs are. To compensate, BYE offers the ability to move the crosshair reticulated to where the star is; not ideal but functional.

Hope this helps,

Guylain

#3 Moey

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 12:53 AM

Yep, that should work, in fact a have several users doing it as you described it :)

The difficult part with an astrotrac is the ability to center the star smack in the middle where the crosshairs are. To compensate, BYE offers the ability to move the crosshair reticulated to where the star is; not ideal but functional.

Hope this helps,

Guylain


Hi Guylian,

Wow thanks for the quick response :D

Is it difficult to center because of the ball head on top of the astrotrac?

#4 mikotoy

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 12:27 PM

I used to do it the way you mention it using BYE, but found that it took even longer than capturing the image.

The issue you end up having is that there is no good sense of how large the angular deviation is and may end up over correcting. I made very small changes to avoid over correction which took greater time vs waiting for the 2 minute cycle to complete and have a far more accurate reading.

#5 Tonk

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Posted 30 November 2012 - 04:01 PM

But this is always the case with any form of drift aligntment - the closer you get to alignment the longer it takes to find out what the error is.






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