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#1 Sluggosalinas

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:01 AM

Hello all,
Last week I put together a rambling "Hello, I'm new, just got a new scope, first light report, been lurking for a while, etc." type post but my computer decided to update before I posted and I don't have the will to re-type it! So a simple, "Howdy, learned alot already and look forward to learning much, much more. " will have to suffice.

On to the question: I have my yearly eye appointment today and I was wondering if there was anything astronomy-specific I could ask the Dr.? I haven't been wearing my eyeglasses to view through the scope as I don't have an official astigmatism...yet.

Do people find they like or don't like to wear glasses while viewing?

If they do wear glasses, are there things to consider? (I have gathered that eyepiece relief becomes an issue.)

Are there any coatings/treatments to avoid on the glasses if you are going to wear them? (polarized, anti-glare, etc.)

Is there a way to have a pair of glasses made that would actually help with viewing?

Any advice would be appreciated, including, "there's nothing to ask him".

#2 Dennis_S253

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:13 AM

Hello and welcome to CN. Though I don't wear my glasses while viewing, it can be a pain if I want to look at a chart or use the setting circles. It's something I put up with. I've been wanting to get the strap and see if it would be better than putting them in my shirt pocket. Some of them questions might be good to ask the Dr. Who knows, maybe he into astronomy also. Clear skies...

#3 MikeBOKC

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:35 AM

My understanding and experience is that absent serious astigmatism. most eyeglass wearers observe without the glasses on. And yes the simple drug store loop to let your glasses dangle around your neck may be the most useful astronomy accessory I have purchased. I keep one in every case. I doubt that there are any modifications to the eyeglasses that would make observing easier; but someone may chime in here with better and more conclusive advice.

#4 Phil Sherman

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:43 AM

Vision issues other than astigmatism are usually handled with small changes to where the scope is "in focus". The only problem with this is when you're sharing the scope and the next viewer needs a slightly different focus point.

The biggest issue I've encountered is the problem of going from the scope to a chart, where the glasses are necessary. The only viable solution I've found is a strap to keep the glasses around my neck when I'm at the scope. If you want to wear your glasses all the time, you'll need to get eyepieces that have enough eye relief for you to easily use them with the glasses on.

Another solution is to change from glasses to contact lenses. My aged eyes now require trifocals and the astigmatism correction is severe enough to make it difficult to get lenses correctly fitted to the frames. I now wear contacts that give me full correction for distance vision and glasses that have the add-on corrections for the intermediate and reading corrections.

Phil

#5 Tony Flanders

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 09:03 AM

The biggest issue I've encountered is the problem of going from the scope to a chart, where the glasses are necessary.


For those of us with myopia, it's just the opposite -- I need to take my glasses off to read charts.

For me, the main purpose of glasses is for looking at the sky. I do that for two reasons -- to get my initial fix when star-hopping, and also because I love the naked-eye view even more than the telescopic view.

I usually take my glasses off when viewing through an eyepiece, and I keep my finderscope focused for glasses-free operation so I can go back and forth from it to charts.

I sometimes keep my glasses on while looking through an eyepiece if I happen to be wearing them already. And for really good low-power views, I need glasses to correct for my astigmatism. That's unnecessary at high powers, though.

The only viable solution I've found is a strap to keep the glasses around my neck when I'm at the scope.


There are two problems with that. First, I keep my red flashlight on a cord around my neck, and two neck cords get tangled easily. Second, in cold weather I need to keep my glasses warm to prevent fogging when I put them on.

For those reasons, I dedicate a pocket (right-hand pocket of my outermost layer) to my eyeglasses.

#6 Skooter

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:16 AM

I've been wearing eyeglasses for 40 years. Hands down, the biggest breakthrough for me is being able to order them online for 1/5 the price. No kidding. Cheap enough to experiment till you get the perfect pair for your particular needs.

For me, it's every optional coating I can get, bifocals (not progressives), in as small a pair as possible to allow closeness to the face for best eye relief.

#7 Saneless

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:28 AM

I wear my contacts. One night I tried to go without them and while things looked ok in the eyepiece, my finder scope was useless.

One question I have though, if I have things focused so I can see them perfectly without glasses, will it be out of focus for someone else? Or is it just the fact that the small image is so close that anyone is fine with it?

#8 izar187

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:50 AM

Depends upon your vision correction prescription. My myopia does not allow others to view where I set the focus when viewing without my glasses.


To the original poster, for a half dozen reasons, I observe the majority of the time with my glasses on these days. For many years I observed with them off, but kept strapped just tight enough to keep them up on my forehead. Dangling did not work for me.

In truth observing with or without glasses is a variable mileage thing, that will change over the years. Partly as ones eyes change, but also as where one observes from changes, and as gear changes, and as guests at the scope change. There is no right nor wrong way to do it.

The majority of problem I had when observing with glasses on went away when I switched to as small a lens glasses as I could get away with, with glass lenses for superior scratch resistance and super easy in the field cleaning, and observing form places where intrusive lighting is screened out or not present.

#9 panhard

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:51 AM

yes it will be out of focus for others. The stronger your glasses are the more out of focus it will be.

#10 Sluggosalinas

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:54 AM

... One night I tried to go without them and while things looked ok in the eyepiece, my finder scope was useless....

Actually this is one of my big problems when I'm not wearing glasses. Looking up from a well focused eyepiece to the (red dot)finder is horrible. I often just put my glasses back on for the finder...then back off for the eyepiece (if I remember...though a few times I've forgotten and bonked the lenses on my eyepiece...ouch).

#11 panhard

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 11:07 AM

a few times I've forgotten and bonked the lenses on my eyepiece...ouch).

That is why I view without my glasses on. I got a 9x50 finder scope that I adjusted to my eyes, problem solved. I also hate hearing my glasses hitting against the scope when I am viewing. So no strap for me. :grin:

#12 GeneT

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 05:54 PM

Hello all,
Last week I put together a rambling "Hello, I'm new, just got a new scope, first light report, been lurking for a while, etc." type post but my computer decided to update before I posted and I don't have the will to re-type it! So a simple, "Howdy, learned alot already and look forward to learning much, much more. " will have to suffice.

On to the question: I have my yearly eye appointment today and I was wondering if there was anything astronomy-specific I could ask the Dr.? I haven't been wearing my eyeglasses to view through the scope as I don't have an official astigmatism...yet.

Do people find they like or don't like to wear glasses while viewing?

If they do wear glasses, are there things to consider? (I have gathered that eyepiece relief becomes an issue.)

Are there any coatings/treatments to avoid on the glasses if you are going to wear them? (polarized, anti-glare, etc.)

Is there a way to have a pair of glasses made that would actually help with viewing?

Any advice would be appreciated, including, "there's nothing to ask him".


After about 50 years in this hobby, I got tired of flipping glasses on and off--in the dark. I decided to develop a viewing strategy where I could do all my viewing wearing glasses. One important criteria is the amount of eye relief of the eyepieces you will be using. I have found that 17mm or eye relief is the minimum that works well for me. When you go to a vendor's site looking for eyepieces, drill down in the specs until you find the eyepiece's eye relief. Be wary of general wording such as "generous eye relief" or "plenty of eye relief to view while wearing glasses." Drill down until you find the exact amount of eye relief. I stated that 17mm is the minimum. More--19 or 20 is even better. Eyepiece types do factor into this equation. Some of the eye lenses are concave and some are convex. Regarding glasses, I use the super thin Varilux, Crizal lenses with a hard coating of anti glare material. These are progressives. What I do is first get the object in view, then focus, and rather than moving my head, I move my eyes throughout the field of viewing. You can also use bi-focal. I am going to buy some tri-focals for testing. Lastly, you want frames that ride high up the bridge of the nose so your eyeball is as close to the eyepiece as possible.
I need to update this, but here is a posting and link I did a few years ago. Stay with this issue. I think you will be happy viewing while wearing glasses.

http://www.cloudynig...rd=Eyepieces...

#13 TexasRed

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 04:06 AM

You'll probably want to avoid progressive "no-line" bifocals. Most people find them very unsuitable for astronomical use.

Get the anti-reflective or anti-glare coatings.

#14 Tony Flanders

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 08:42 AM

Get the anti-reflective or anti-glare coatings.


For what it's worth, people are split about anti-reflective coatings. Many people adore them, and they're theoretically great for astronomy.

I bought a pair and couldn't wait to get rid of them; they were a total nightmare. I have deep-set eyes and oily skin, so even with normal glasses I wash them (and my face) several times a day. For whatever reason, antireflective coatings exacerbate the problem. They're great for about 3 or 4 minutes after I put them on, and after that they're much worse than uncoated glasses.

Fortunately, the coatings came with a satisfaction-or-money-back guarantee. My optometrist says he can predict whether people will like antireflective coatings based on how often they clean their regular glasses.

#15 Skooter

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 08:59 AM

I had always gotten plain anti-glare, but changed it to "premium oleophobic" or oil and fingerprint resistant for my last pair, and the difference is like night and day! Oils and dust seem to glide right off the lens with this new coating. Price diff was only about $10 through Zenni Optical.

Also, smaller lenses tend to mitigate the oil/face contact problem for me. Except, the lense can't be too small and still fit bifocals or progressives. So, as with everything in life, it's a trade-off.

#16 lamplight

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 02:32 PM

I wasjustin the store yesterdayand seeyou canget anti fogginglenses. In winter its toomuch apain to take them on and off, butivefound the bigger the glass of the glassesthe less the frameinterferes

#17 tezster

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 02:44 PM

A lot of people take their glasses off, but I'm just so used to keeping them on (old habits die hard, I guess), so that's what I've stuck with through the years. I know it's an extra "layer" of optics between my eyes and the view, but I can live with that. Whenever I need to buy new glasses, that's one item I don't skimp on in terms of getting a good pair with thinner/better coatings.

As a consequence, I also make sure all my EPs have generous eye-relief.

#18 GeneT

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 04:53 PM

I have deep-set eyes and oily skin, so even with normal glasses I wash them (and my face) several times a day. For whatever reason, antireflective coatings exacerbate the problem.


I had the same problem with a set of glasses. When I switched to Varilux, I was reluctant to get the anti glare. The optician told me to try the anti glare and if I had the same problem, he would replace the lenses at no charge. The Varilux lenses cleaned smooth as silk, and did not attract oily smudges. There are a lot of related issues in developing a strategy for viewing while wearing glasses.

#19 orion61

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 05:11 PM

Crown glass (white) has a higher refraction index than CR39 Plastic and tho heavier give a clearer view.
I hate glasses.. Contacts smear light for me.

#20 StarStuff1

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 05:18 PM

Welcome Sluggo! As others report as you age your eyes certainly do too! I'm at the point I wear bifocals most of the time (tried no-line bifocals and hated them). Even tho my distance vision is not great it is good enough for naked eye astronomy and at the eyepiece focusing for my eyes. I learned a year ago that where best focus is for me is NOT best focus for a young person or anyone else with 20-20 vision. I have been teaching astro labs for more than 10 years at the local U. Now I let the lab assistants (also students) focus the scopes.

#21 Solar Ken

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 09:28 PM

You'll probably want to avoid progressive "no-line" bifocals. Most people find them very unsuitable for astronomical use.

Get the anti-reflective or anti-glare coatings.


Not true. I weare no line progressive lenses with no problem at the eyepiece.

#22 Mxplx2

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 08:01 PM

For some reason this popped into my head about eyeglasses, so I thought I'd resurrect this older post. I once worked with a woman whose job was to inspect product under a microscope (one eyepiece type), then turn her attention to the product on the table she worked on. She wore eyglasses with one lens removed, so she could deal with the microscope with the unaided eye, then see the work on the table with the one eyeglass. It worked for her.






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