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Is what is in the box all we need to get started?

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#26 newtoskies

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 09:48 AM

It's an identical scope to the AD10, both are very good from what I have read and heard from those who own them. With a 10" dob he will be set for a long time. Both those scopes cost under $500 and have free shipping, can't go wrong there.

I hear you on the overwhelming part. I am going through the same situation picking out a refractor.

#27 another lost one

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 09:58 AM

Very quick question while I am on a break...and I hate asking this because any kind of telescope is such a beautiful and delicate instrument, but if we got a big dob, would it damage it to keep it in the garage (specifically would the colder temps damage it)? It wouldn't be my preference, but if we keep it in the house we will have to take it around a tight corner and down steps in order to get it outside. The garage is level to the ground and we could just put it on one of those wheelie things and move it to the drive, to the patio, etc.
Sorry if that is a bad question...
Deanne

#28 Tony Flanders

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 10:08 AM

Very quick question while I am on a break...and I hate asking this because any kind of telescope is such a beautiful and delicate instrument


Telescopes may be beautiful, but they're certainly not delicate. On the contrary, they're robust hunks of metal, glass, and sometimes wood or plastic that are explicitly designed to be used outdoors under adverse circumstances.

Dobs, being extremely simple, are particularly robust. A Dob is extremely hard to damage.

Would it damage it to keep it in the garage (specifically would the colder temps damage it)?


In fact, storing it in the cold is preferable. It avoids a long wait for the telescope to cool down before using it, and all processes that might damage the scope work slower when it's cold. That's true for 'most everything else in the world, by the way. There's a reason that people store food in refrigerators!

There are two things you have to watch out for: mold and exhaust fumes. If (heaven forbid!) you keep your car in the garage, make sure that you don't run it there for any length of time, and make sure it's well ventilated. (Both good ideas anyway unless you enjoy carbon-monoxide poisoning.)

And if the garage is humid, it may encourage the growth of mold on the optics, which is not a good thing at all. You would know based on other stuff that's stored there. If it is a problem, keeping a low-watt light bulb on inside the telescope tube will eliminate the problem.

#29 newtoskies

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 10:42 AM

Thanks for the VERY helpful advice Tony. Things to think about as I too am thinking of storing in the garage or shed.

#30 csrlice12

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 10:51 AM

No problem with the garage as long as you be sure the car exhaust fumes have cleared out before you close the garage (car exhaust forms an acid when mixed with humidity, not good for mirrors). Also, if possible, when the scope is in the mount, put it in the horizonal position. While it takes up less space in the vertical position, in the horizontal position dew/frost is less likely to form on the mirror surface, and if it does, will run off. It left verticle, the moisture would "pool" in the mirror. Also, maybe put a shower cap on the mirror end with a couple of dessicant packages (I get mine out of old pill bottles). This helps reduce moisture and helps to keep spiders and other crawly things out of the scope.)

Clear Skies!

#31 howard929

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 10:57 AM

Tony,

One has to do what one has to. I get that. In my neck of the woods anything left in a shed or unheated/cooled garage rusts if it's able to and becomes a haven for mice, spiders and Lord knows what else. My telescopes are my babies, I actively worry about them and I would never, ever.... but that's just me. :help:

#32 YetAnotherHobby

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 12:33 PM

Just to echo the comments on useability - an EQ mount cannot be beat if you are intent on photography, but for general ease-of-use an altitude-azimuth (alt-az) mount is a whole lot simpler to point at things. I tended to fight with my EQ mount, whereas my dob's movements feel almost natural by comparison.
If you leave the dob out in the garage one easy way to move them is with a cheapo hand truck. When you are ready to observe just slide the hand truck under the base and wheel the entire scope out to your observing site. Much faster than bringing the tripod/mount and then the OTA out in separate trips. This is how I move my 12" dob out of the house. Lift and carry was a real workout and took multiple trips - handtruck is much easier.

#33 droid

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 12:50 PM

I see everyone has already recommended a dob, I would too. One thing though, with a dob, you will have to learn how to colimate it, align all the optics, to get the best views, a little research here in CN will help and with two people, itll be easier than it sounds.

#34 howard929

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 01:15 PM

I see everyone has already recommended a dob, I would too. One thing though, with a dob, you will have to learn how to colimate it, align all the optics, to get the best views, a little research here in CN will help and with two people, itll be easier than it sounds.


The first telescope I owned was a 10" Newt on a EQ mount. I spent days and days trying to figure out how to get that working. Sometimes I'd drag it around to get it pointing towards Jupiter and raise one of the legs with a chunk of wood. In the end, I sent that back and bought the 8" dob I still own. Right out of the assembly which was rather simple to do, it was and still is love at first sight.

#35 Tony Flanders

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 02:25 PM

In my neck of the woods anything left in a shed or unheated/cooled garage rusts if it's able to and becomes a haven for mice, spiders and Lord knows what else.


Good point about the critters. It's not a problem with sealed telescopes, but scopes with ventilation holes are an invitation to mice and insects. Just think about it -- a big empty box with comfy-sized holes just right for you and too small for your predators -- who could ask for anything more?

This is, in fact, the main reason that I keep the scope at my country home indoors instead of in the garage. I make strenuous efforts to exterminate mice inside the house, but I'm not willing to contemplate the carnage required to keep them out of the garage.

#36 tezster

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 02:53 PM

Deanne, if you do end up getting a dob and store it in the garage, I would recommend covering both ends of the tube when not in use, and plug the focuser as well (the collimation cap that comes with many commercial dobs does a good job of this).

Good luck with your decision :)

#37 fuzzystuff4ever

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 03:38 PM

My first (adult) scope was an 8" dob and it's a perfect 1st scope; big enough to make deep sky objects interesting, and as been stated by others, doesn't take up too much room when being stored. One really cheap accessory I found useful was a couple of elastic shower cap-type covers for the ends of the tube to keep dust out (my scope didn't come with any kind of covers). Good Luck!

Brian

#38 another lost one

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 05:46 PM

I have been sold on the dob, no matter where we store it!
If we do keep it in the garage, I am very confident that my husband will be able to wrap it snugly and securely, top to bottom. He might not even want to leave it out there - we are pretty sentimental about such things.
Now I'm so excited, I don't know how I will be able to wait until Christmas...
Thank you all so much! I will keep you posted:)

#39 Paco_Grande

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 09:04 PM

:waytogo:

#40 star drop

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 09:37 AM

I have been sold on the dob, no matter where we store it!
If we do keep it in the garage, I am very confident that my husband will be able to wrap it snugly and securely, top to bottom. He might not even want to leave it out there - we are pretty sentimental about such things.
Now I'm so excited, I don't know how I will be able to wait until Christmas...
Thank you all so much! I will keep you posted:)

I like my 25" Dobsonian a lot too but it has to stay in the shed.






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