Jump to content


Photo

"The Moon" by Wilkins & Moore

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Rick Woods

Rick Woods

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 14815
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Inner Solar System

Posted 05 December 2012 - 06:15 PM

I posted this question in the Lunar Observing forum, but didn't get much response, so I'm trying here.

I'm thinking about getting a copy of this book. It's a bit expensive, so I'm hoping for opinions from a few owners before plunking my pazoozas down. I know it's very dated, and will contain a lot of incorrect speculation. But did you like it? And, is there any advantage to paying more for the 1955 edition, other than resale value?

If you responded in the Lunie Bin, don't do it again here; I'll check both locations.

Thanks!

#2 fred1871

fred1871

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 893
  • Joined: 22 Mar 2009
  • Loc: Australia

Posted 06 December 2012 - 09:40 PM

Hi Rick - I have a copy of the 1955 edition, so I can't comment on later printings. Got it as a Christmas present from my parents many many years ago.

It's a book that still has some interest. The text is largely descriptive, feature by lunar feature, including notes on who saw what when, in terms of discovering details. And there's a lot of discussion of details and features, also shown on the maps, which really need a magnifying glass in some areas.

The maps I suspect are regarded as variably accurate these days, post photo-mapping. And there are quite a few drawings of particular craters and areas.

I find it still a book of some interest and use for lunar observing, sometimes for comparing what I see with what's in the book. Do they match up? :grin:

Some of the terms are old-style - "cleft" for the current "rille", for example. And some crater names etc are changed since it was published.

There's not much discussion of volcanic vs impact ideas and suchlike - it's essentially an observers guide, though the introduction (and occasional notes in the main text) do discuss possible changes on the lunar surface. And there's mention (intro) of difficulties in accepting Nasmyth's volcanic theory about lunar craters.

I like the book, though it's clearly dated. I find it a still interesting supplement to my more recent acquisitions on matters Luna.

#3 deepskytraveler

deepskytraveler

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 169
  • Joined: 25 Dec 2005
  • Loc: Worthington, OH

Posted 06 December 2012 - 11:56 PM

Rick,

PM sent

#4 Rick Woods

Rick Woods

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 14815
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Inner Solar System

Posted 07 December 2012 - 06:53 PM

... and returned!

PS: Holy Shmek! Is that your telescope in your avatar???

#5 deepskytraveler

deepskytraveler

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 169
  • Joined: 25 Dec 2005
  • Loc: Worthington, OH

Posted 08 December 2012 - 12:12 AM

Sure wish that was my scope and observatory, but it isn't. It is Jimi Lowrey's 48" f/4 dob located near Ft. Davis TX or as Jimi say's "one mountain south of McDonald Observatory." That is me up on the ladder. This past March I spent a full week centered around New Moon observing with Jimi. What an incredible experience!

-Mark

#6 LivingNDixie

LivingNDixie

    TSP Chowhound

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 18706
  • Joined: 23 Apr 2003
  • Loc: Trussville, AL

Posted 08 December 2012 - 03:34 PM

Sure wish that was my scope and observatory, but it isn't. It is Jimi Lowrey's 48" f/4 dob located near Ft. Davis TX or as Jimi say's "one mountain south of McDonald Observatory." That is me up on the ladder. This past March I spent a full week centered around New Moon observing with Jimi. What an incredible experience!

-Mark


I got to talk to Jimi for a bit after his talk at TSP 2011. He is a super nice guy.

#7 Rick Woods

Rick Woods

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 14815
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Inner Solar System

Posted 18 December 2012 - 05:43 PM

Hi everyone,

Well, thanks to one of our excellent CN members (I don't name names, they can reveal themselves if they like), I've acquired a 1st-edition copy of "The Moon" in great condition. I'm just starting to read it; but the whole thing appears to be mainly a gazeteer, with a short bit of informative material in the beginning. It's pretty much like the Rukl atlas, except the information is quite dated (but the observational text is still fine); the Wilkins 300-inch map is far inferior to the Rukl map; and the descriptions of each feature are much longer and more detailed. There's only brief mention of volcanic theory or TLPs.

I'd have to conclude that this is the proto-Rukl, and a wonderful snapshot of lunar knowledge at the middle of the 20th century. I'm very glad to have it. It didn't have a dust jacket, so I made one with my copy machine and wrapped it in a DJ protector (otherwise, I know bloody well that this book, which has survived 58 years in excellent condition, would get something spilled on it right away.)

My thanks again to the seller.






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics