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NOAA Satellite Reveals New Views of Earth at Night

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#1 MessiToM

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 06:51 PM

http://www.nasa.gov/...h-at-night.html

#2 MessiToM

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 07:01 PM

High res picture of the U.S
http://eoimages2.gsf...b_united_sta...

#3 MessiToM

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 07:01 PM

sorry, dbl post

#4 FirstSight

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 08:01 PM

Magnificent, thanks! The US high-res vividly shows how formidable a challenge most of us in the eastern 2/5 of the U.S. have in accessing anything even moderately approaching true dark skies. A couple of the most surprising aspects of the whole-earth image was that of European countries, Italy seems quite noticeably more densely, brightly lit than any of the others, and also that the Arabian peninsula had not just bright spots around the edges where the cities were, but quite a few substantial islands of light smack in the middle of what I had assumed was some of the most sparsely populated, hostile desert on earth (the empty quarter).

#5 Tony Flanders

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 08:25 PM

Italy seems quite noticeably more densely, brightly lit than any of the others.


Intriguing. I was just in Italy, and despite being far more densely populated than the U.S., it seemed darker on the whole.

The Arabian peninsula had not just bright spots around the edges where the cities were, but quite a few substantial islands of light smack in the middle of what I had assumed was some of the most sparsely populated, hostile desert on earth (the empty quarter).


Flares from oil or gas wells, no doubt. Those are some of the brightest light sources on Earth.

Night fishing done with lights to attract shmrimp is another surprise.

#6 SkipW

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 05:53 PM

The Williston Basin and its oilfields spanning the ND/MT border is the large fuzzy patch north and west of Minneapolis. Wow!

#7 germana1

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 07:41 PM

Very interesting but also very sad not too many dark spots in US except out west.
Pete

#8 JayinUT

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 11:53 PM

Can I mention how lucky I feel to live out west? I feel even luckier to live in Utah with its wide choices of dark sites to travel to.

#9 Meadeball

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 03:06 AM

Hmmm, Moscow doesn't need high-tech GPS stuff in their ICBMs, just photosensors and a night-launch policy ... :bigshock:

:dabomb:

#10 Pharquart

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 04:25 PM

The Williston Basin and its oilfields spanning the ND/MT border is the large fuzzy patch north and west of Minneapolis. Wow!


I use an older version of this shot as my computer's wallpaper, so I'm familiar with what it used to look like. I immediately noticed the bright patch in the Dakotas and assumed it was the recent oilfield development. Ugh!

Now I want all the light pollutions maps and overlays to be updated so I can continue to search for darker skies.

Brian

#11 lintonius

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 01:09 AM

Can I mention how lucky I feel to live out west? I feel even luckier to live in Utah with its wide choices of dark sites to travel to.


Amen brother! I'm just getting settled in to our new home near Capitol Reef. The sky around here just blows me away! I used to have to drive 90 minutes or more to get under skies that don't hold a candle to my own back yard.
No light domes... stars right down to the horizon...
http://cleardarksky....ml?Mn=dobsonian
Loving it! :jump:
Linton

#12 mountain monk

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 10:23 AM

Ah, Capital Reef, my favorite observing site. Lucky man! And indeed, all of us are lucky to live in the great American West.

Dark skies.

Jack

#13 CollinofAlabama

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 09:59 PM

Amen, my western brother! Born and raised in the east, I moved to West Texas in 1992, and I'll never live in the east again if I can help it. Might move further west, but not east.

The West is the best.
Jim Morrison

#14 lintonius

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 05:32 AM

Ah, Capital Reef, my favorite observing site. Lucky man! And indeed, all of us are lucky to live in the great American West.

Dark skies.

Jack


Indeed, Jack.
Look me up next time you're down in the area.
I believe Capitol Reef is one of our most under-rated...
and under-visited... national parks. But I like it that way! ;^)
Linton

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#15 csa/montana

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:22 AM

And indeed, all of us are lucky to live in the great American West.



+1 Indeed we are! :bow: I used to take my dark skies for granted, until I joined CN, & read about other's skies.

#16 mountain monk

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:27 PM

Well, it was 27 degrees below zero here this morning, so Im changing my vote: I want to live on Maui? :)

Dark skies.

Jack

#17 mountain monk

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 04:30 PM

Well, it was 27 degrees below zero here this morning, so Im changing my vote: I want to live in Maui? :)

Dark skies.

Jack

#18 Tom Polakis

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 06:43 PM

I just started really studying this image. I wondered why northwestern North Dakota and northeastern Montana had such widespread light. There is a concentration of lights that is about 100 miles in diameter despite there being very little in the way of cities. Anybody know what that is?

Tom

#19 mountain monk

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:36 PM

Gas and oil development.

Dark skies.

Jack

#20 GeneT

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:14 PM

These are beautiful.

#21 kenrenard

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 10:27 AM

It's interesting how there is a line in the US where the lights just stop. For dark skies I am on the wrong side of the line!!






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