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7 hours of Jupiter rotation - 11/17 & 11/19

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#1 zAmbonii

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 03:12 PM

I never finished up processing of images that I had taken on Nov 17th. I'll just refer you to images posted during capture. I went and took the images from the 17th and 19th and created a couple of animations. The first animation is just from images taken on the 17th. The second is a combined animation from the 17th and 19th, just to see how much of a full rotation I ended up with. Turned out to be about 7 hours worth.

Click on the image or link to view the animations.

Posted Image
Jupiter 11/17/12 by zAmb0ni, on Flickr

Posted Image
7 hours of Jupiter 11/17, 11/19/12 by zAmb0ni, on Flickr

#2 edsplace

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 09:29 PM

That is excellent! How did you keep the color, brightness, contract so perfect for all the images?

#3 zAmbonii

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 09:53 PM

That is excellent! How did you keep the color, brightness, contract so perfect for all the images?


The camera white balance settings are usually the same between one session to another. During capture, I try to keep the histogram at the same levels throughout the captures, and I can do that on the fly in between captures with wcctrl. I usually have to turn down the gain slightly as Jupiter rises.

That is one way to keep things even between captures. When stacking, I have the "Normalize Stack" setting checked and use a value of 85%. I think that helps some also.

Finally when I bring all of the frames into photoshop, I do an autocolor run on all of the frames (I have a vb script that does all the dirty work) that gets the color straightened out. That usually evens most of the frames out pretty good, but if there is a period of bad seeing, they tend to be brighter than the others. If that happens, I manually do a difference between one frame and another and do a manual level/curves adjustment to get them to the same brightness.

If I really knew programming, I might be able to come up with an automated way of getting things absolutely perfect. But I think that is beyond the scope of photoshop and maybe something that could work in matlab or something similar.






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