Jump to content


Photo

Seeing conditions with Daystar filters?

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Aquarist

Aquarist

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1041
  • Joined: 27 Aug 2012
  • Loc: Illinois

Posted 08 December 2012 - 05:06 PM

How important are seeing conditions for solar observing with Daystar filters on a refractor (TOA 150)? Will observing from my Technical Innovations dome be a problem? Is there any season or time of day that is likely to be better or worse (suburban backyard observatory)?
Thanks in advance.

#2 GolfSierra

GolfSierra

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 128
  • Joined: 27 Dec 2008
  • Loc: Michigan

Posted 08 December 2012 - 08:02 PM

My old T-Scanner with an AP 130 is no different than the dedicated Lunt 60 I use now. It is all about the local seeing, when I had a Home Dome mid morning was best before surface heating or wind picks up. In winter the jet stream kills a lot of the clear days. I was in Michigan at the time and you have the lake effect to boot, looks like a gorgeous day to start and clouds form out of thin air. Every once in awhile it would be the perfect day.

Gary

#3 GolfSierra

GolfSierra

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 128
  • Joined: 27 Dec 2008
  • Loc: Michigan

Posted 08 December 2012 - 08:02 PM

My old T-Scanner with an AP 130 is no different than the dedicated Lunt 60 I use now. It is all about the local seeing, when I had a Home Dome mid morning was best before surface heating or wind picks up. In winter the jet stream kills a lot of the clear days. I was in Michigan at the time and you have the lake effect to boot, looks like a gorgeous day to start and clouds form out of thin air. Every once in awhile it would be the perfect day.

Gary

#4 GolfSierra

GolfSierra

    Vostok 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 128
  • Joined: 27 Dec 2008
  • Loc: Michigan

Posted 08 December 2012 - 08:04 PM

Sorry for twice, touchy Ipad

#5 Aquarist

Aquarist

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1041
  • Joined: 27 Aug 2012
  • Loc: Illinois

Posted 08 December 2012 - 10:28 PM

Thanks. I considered a dedicated Lunt but the TOA gives me night time options as well.

#6 marktownley

marktownley

    Cosmos

  • -----
  • Posts: 8581
  • Joined: 19 Aug 2008
  • Loc: West Midlands, UK

Posted 09 December 2012 - 03:56 AM

Gary sums this up very well Steve, don't forget you can always step the 150 down when seeing isn't cooperating...

#7 drksky

drksky

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1760
  • Joined: 31 Aug 2009
  • Loc: Bloomington, IL

Posted 10 December 2012 - 07:52 PM

Gary sums this up very well Steve, don't forget you can always step the 150 down when seeing isn't cooperating...


In fact, you most likely want to step it down anyway since Daystars are optimal at f/30. Which at f/7 native you want at least a 4X barlow or Powermate.

#8 Enyo

Enyo

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 67
  • Joined: 15 May 2003

Posted 11 December 2012 - 09:15 PM

In my experience Solar is no different than planets. With my Daystar and SolarSpecturm filters I never saw an advantage to stopping down my AP130. If seeing is bad then the see is just bad and nothing helps. If seeing is good you want as large a scope as possible. When I lived by Lake Michigan local seeing was rarely an issue (morning afternoon or evening were usually good) as long as it was clear! However if the jet stream was within 200miles seeing was usually poor.

#9 AstroPaolo

AstroPaolo

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 917
  • Joined: 30 Jan 2008

Posted 12 December 2012 - 04:14 AM

i also work always at full aperture but I would like to check if reducing the ap and using a lower barlow I could take a full disc mosaic. It is anoying prepare all the telescopes/filter and discover the seeing is worst and cannot make anything. :)






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics