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favorite 2-for-1 DSOs?

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#1 uniondrone

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 03:35 PM

I am a fan of any bright deep sky objects that can share a single field of view in a typical telescope. Although I have viewed a number of these, I am always looking out for more. Any suggestions?

Some favorites:

1) NGC 869 and 884

2) M81 and M82

3) M65 and M66

4) M108 and M97

5) M46 and NGC 2438


What others do you enjoy?

#2 Tony Flanders

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 03:54 PM

Two really obvious ones:

M46 and M47
M35 and NGC 2158

And, of course

M31, M32, M110
M84, M86, and some or all of Markarian's Chain

#3 IVM

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:19 PM

M106 and NGC 4248. Although the Magellanic companion of the Messier is not terribly bright and the detail seen in it with a moderate aperture is subtle, the pair overall is fantastic: http://ivm-deep-sky....d-ngc-4248.html

#4 Astrojensen

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 04:25 PM

NGC 6939 and NGC 6946 comes to mind.

M13 and NGC 6207

M33 and NGC 604

M51 and NGC 5195


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#5 uniondrone

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 05:40 PM

NGC 6939 and NGC 6946 comes to mind.


OOOooh, that's a good one. I forgot about that pair! :bow:


M84, M86, and some or all of Markarian's Chain



Ah, yes... of course! :foreheadslap:

#6 kfiscus

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 05:43 PM

+1 on the 6939 and 6946.

Also the Coathanger has a gorgeous cluster at its tip that no one talks about.

#7 Astrojensen

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 05:58 PM

Also the Coathanger has a gorgeous cluster at its tip that no one talks about.


NGC 6802.

*

There are many galaxy pairs, but NGC 3226/3227 are pretty bright. Sort of.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#8 Sasa

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:05 PM

Other nice candidates for small telescopes just quickly from my memory:

NGC 6440 + NGC6445 (at low powers they look very similar despite they different nature)

M53 + NGC5053

NGC6712 + IC1295

#9 Starman1

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:24 PM

And one of the best of all:
OpenCluster NGC6520 + DarkNebula Barnard 86 + (in the big scopes) GlobularCluster ESO 456-38

Or Messier 65 + Messier 66 + NGC3628 galaxies

Or Galaxy pair NGC4631/4627 + Galaxy pair NGC4656/4657

Or Planetary Nebula Messier 97 + Galaxy Messier 108
Or NGC7331 and the "Deer Lick" Group (5 galaxies)
Or Stefan's Quintet (actually 6 galaxies)
Or Copeland's Septet (7 galaxies)
Or NGC1274/1275 and the center of Abell 426 (we counted 50+ galaxies in a 45' field in a 28" scope and 8 or so in an 8" scope)

I guess it depends on the size of the field of view and how faint you want to go.

I remember being mightily impressed by the first two I list when I was using a 4" refractor.

In a 10", you should have no trouble until you get down to NGC7331 and companions. 7331 is easy--the companions aren't.

#10 Astrojensen

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:58 PM

Much depends on the scope. A big one will be able to show A LOT of galaxies in one field, by targeting the Perseus, Coma, Hercules or other large galaxy clusters. A small, wide field refractor will be able to scoop up half a dozen galaxies in Markarian's Chain and multiple clusters in Cassiopeia and elsewhere. In the OP it was mentioned that the objects should be relatively bright, which is why I didn't mention such objects as Stephan's Quintet and the companions to NGC 7331.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#11 David Knisely

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 02:20 AM

I like the "whale" galaxy, NGC 4631, and the "hockey stick" galaxy NGC 4656:

Attached Files



#12 RolandosCY

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 03:56 AM

I agree with the whale and stick, but even allowing only "the whale and pup" (NGC 4631 and 4627) is another wonderful pair, relatively bright from dark skies even in a 4-inch refractor! These two galaxies have something really "addictive" for me, I always search for them in spring / early summer independently of anything else I might have on my list!

#13 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 03:57 AM

Some of my favorites have already been listed: B86 and NGC 6520, M35 and NGC 2158, M46 and NGC 2438, the Leo Trio, M81 and M82, M97 and M108, the Double Cluster, NGC 4631 and NGC 4656, and NGC 6939 and NGC 6946.

M38 and NGC 1907 make up another good pair of open clusters.

http://www.easternvo...luster_003.html

The Draco Trio (NGC 5981, NGC 5982, and NGC 5981) and Hickson 44 (NGC 3185, NGC 3190, and NGC 3193) are two fine galaxy groups that haven't been mentioned. Another interesting trio is NGC 1035, NGC 1042, and NGC 1052 in Cetus.

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#14 Sasa

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 06:55 AM

or

NGC1333 + Barnard 205
Kemble's Cascade + NGC1502
Mirach + NGC404
IC5146 + Barnard 168

With galaxies, you can get almost infinite list. Some other nice and easy pairs/triplets are

NGC4490+NGC4485

NGC4754+NGC4762 (extra thin galaxy, fantastic even in small telescopes)

Antennae, NGC3395/6, NGC3607/8/5, M31/32/110, ... you name it

#15 Tom Polakis

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 09:42 AM

NGC6712 + IC1295


That's not a pair that you see mentioned often. They look very similar in size and brightness when viewed through an OIII filter, overlaid on the Scutum star cloud.

Tom

#16 The Planetman

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 01:29 PM

For big scopes, Messier 57 and IC 1296

#17 blb

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 01:52 PM

I like the "whale" galaxy, NGC 4631, and the "hockey stick" galaxy NGC 4656...


While in the area, I like the interacting pair of NGC 4490 (Cacoon Galaxy) and NGC 4485.

#18 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 03:04 PM

Kemble's Cascade + NGC1502


Another asterism/open cluster pair, albeit a bit more difficult to see simultaneously, is Collinder 399 and NGC 6802.

http://www.flickr.co...rady/931278250/

NGC 4485 and NGC 4490 and NGC 6812 and IC 1295 are always well worth a look.

http://observing.sky...r/NGC_4490.html

http://www.flickr.co...840/7793074102/

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#19 Sasa

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 05:00 PM

Another asterism/open cluster pair, albeit a bit more difficult to see simultaneously, is Collinder 399 and NGC 6802.
Dave Mitsky


Yes Dave this is also a favorite of mine, there was even another companion last autumn: here.

Another interesting pair from this summer is NGC6522+NGC6528, the two clusters fit in the same FOV even at magnification of 80x.

#20 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 01:51 PM

NGC 6522 and NGC 6528 are a fine example of a globular cluster 2-for-1.

http://skycenter.ari...lusters/NGC6522

Dave Mitsky

#21 Astrodj

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 04:48 PM

M24 & ngc6603 is a summer favorite of mine.

#22 ensign

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 01:02 PM

NGC 6520 and B86 (the Ink Spot).

#23 Jacques

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 04:59 AM

with galaxies, you can get almost infinite list.

+1

A lot of cuties have already been mentioned.
How about Ngc 663, 659 and 654 or M103 and Trumpler 1 or even all five in the same wide field of view in Cassiopeia?

#24 uniondrone

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 11:36 AM

with galaxies, you can get almost infinite list.

+1

A lot of cuties have already been mentioned.
How about Ngc 663, 659 and 654 or M103 and Trumpler 1 or even all five in the same wide field of view in Cassiopeia?


Yeah, it seems that galaxies pairs and open cluster pairs are fairly easy to come by. I find the odd pairing to be fascnating, like M13 and NGC 6207. It gives a near-far contrast and a shape/structure contrast that is appealing to me. For the same reason, I like the M108 and M97 pairing.






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