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Mars process - is this for real?

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#1 DesertRat

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 06:40 PM

It has come to my attention that there are efforts underway to encourage us to push things a little harder. In another thread on this forum it is being asked if "is this for real?" For reasons I cannot divulge, I cannot contribute to that discussion. But I can add to the discussion concerning the ease in which the technology has helped us achieve amazing results. Since Jupiter is so easy, you might be interested in another planet now a little out of reach as its glides around near the Sun.

The planet is Mars. Yes I've pushed it to the limits. I took one of my better images near conjunction and performed enough iterations of a home brew deconvolution process on it until all the numbers were denormalized. Yes you heard that right - denormal. If you're not familiar with the IEEE specification for floating point I apologize, but lets just say it was a bit dicey there for a while. Then I proceeded to run the result through enough wavelets until all the pixels were imaginary. The kernel itself was imaginary and 137 units across. Yes, you heard that right also - 137 is as you know the number of angels that can dance on the head of a pin. Since I was now working in phase space I proceeded to apply wavefront reconstruction techniques using MatLab to see if I could attain nirvana, the ultimate image of Mars surpassing all one could hope for. After recovering from a few blue screens on the old quad core I finally managed to accomplish the best superresolution image thus far. Sadly no one has seen fit to publish it, and I cannot post it here as it does not comply within forum guidelines. Sadly the image itself has grown to a size it just barely fits on an external 3TB drive. As of this writing no commercial software I know of can deal with its dimensions. But you can be sure of one thing - I "left no money on the table"!

So as Lady Gaga would say to her little monsters, here is a hint to future developments. Next time Mars approaches I will be in Mexico with a big telescope. I might leave a few pesos on the table, but the results will be posted here, I promise.

Glenn

#2 Carl12

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:15 AM

:D :D :D

Looking forward to your art!

#3 Freddy WILLEMS

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:18 AM

:nonono: :nonono:

#4 MvZ

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:52 AM

That brightened my day ;)

#5 tjensen

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 08:01 AM

interesting technique Glenn. Though I'm a little confused... wouldn't the application of wavelets to make the pixels imaginary followed by Wavefront processing push the image into n-dimensional space? That would explain the blue screens as your computer was probably searching for the extra dimensions to store the data. It would also explain why my HDD seems to be losing storage capacity. Cyberspace would make a suitable alternative to your 3Tb external. Especially since so many imaginary images are already stored there.

Well done though!

#6 swalker

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 10:17 AM

I think my brain asploded reading that...

#7 Rankinstudio

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 10:23 AM

Well geeze, where can we see this amazing image?

#8 aaube

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 11:42 AM

Well Glenn, a Mars challenge it is! I took the liberty of a shortcut as my head nearly exploded when trying to reproduce your method. So, in this process, a single pixel of a last Mars apparition picture was used, i then zoomed, waveleted (patend pending on the verb...) and deconvoluted the s... out of it till all "meta details" contained within start showing up...

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#9 Sunspot

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 12:50 PM

It's still uploading...another 7 months and it will be ready for download. :jump:

Paul

Well geeze, where can we see this amazing image?



#10 DesertRat

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 01:55 PM

Darn it aaube! Even though I left out a few intermediate steps such as the need to establish a coherent reference source, you managed to do the virtually impossible and duplicate some of my earlier work!

After receiveing numerous requests for some graphics I relented and was able to recover a small thumbnail of the result which has finally been accepted for publication here.

You'll need to reduce this graphic onto some high resolution copy film and reconstruct the thumbnail with a collimated laser source. Or if you're feeling lucky you can just take the 2d FFT of the graphic to see a monochrome version of just a tiny segment of my achievement. Warning some of the image here may be disturbing to younger viewers! You've been warned. Also you may have to contrast stretch the result if you are using conventional methods which I have surpassed long ago...

Glenn

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#11 lukasik

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 02:42 PM

Duelin' Marvins - you Guys are killin me!

#12 bunyon

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 03:00 PM

I reinverted the pixels on my last Mars shot of the season (in March, I think) and I caught this very nice reflection off the polar cap.

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#13 zAmbonii

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 03:24 PM

I really hate those images. I can never get them when they have 'em displayed at the mall.

Let me guess....is it a sailboat?

...
After receiveing numerous requests for some graphics I relented and was able to recover a small thumbnail of the result which has finally been accepted for publication here.
...

Posted Image



#14 MvZ

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 04:43 PM

You are correct sir. Not too long ago there still was water on Mars. Here is the image demistified for you, using the state of the art quantum-pixelation transformation-plugin in Photoshop CS9000 (astronomers edition of course, the feature is unlocked after manually processing 9000 astronomy images in just about 150 minutes).

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#15 Rankinstudio

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 05:17 PM

I don't know Emil. I think if you continued to actually challenge yourself you could push that image a bit harder and read the tag numbers on the boats.

#16 DesertRat

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 06:41 PM

Good one Emil! Your contributions have furthered planetary imaging significantly. The attention given to aberrant websites is sad, the other thread (and this one?) hopefully will not deter anyone from thinking about, creating and sharing advances.

Edit: I should have stressed I was being serious above. The sailboat is not Emil's contribution I was referring too!

zambonii wrote:

I really hate those images. I can never get them when they have 'em displayed at the mall.



Sorry Mr Z, it is not a stereogram, but a computer generated fourier hologram. Not as cool as a fresnel type but I really was trying to keep it simple. You can see the image by applying a 2d FFT to the image. If your IP does not have this function a free IP that does is ImageJ. Just open image and perform Process->FFT->FFT. To see it well you need to play with the histogram as the central pixel is a large DC term. Really!

Now lets get back to reality and the previously scheduled program! Even if its an easy Jupiter, please?

Glenn

#17 PaulEK

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Posted 11 December 2012 - 11:51 PM

Obviously, none of you need to be told this, but the 'oversupply' of 'easy' images you post here are nothing but. That you are willing not only to share the images, but the techniques, and even the software, is something lots of us are deeply grateful for.

To be shown here that many of you are also very funny is an added treat!

Sorry for the seriousness.






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