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CGEM DX Balance Issues

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#1 JMac85X

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 02:40 PM

I've had this mount since late September and I really do enjoy it. I'm used to the weight of toting it to the backyard and my back doesn't hurt anymore, but I still have the issue of balacing. It always has a sweet spot where if it slews to the left it's smooth but if it goes up and to the right it will kind of hop and the motors strain. Also I bought the polar aligner and I don't know how I can put polaris in the stencil outline because I can't see it at night and during the day when I can polaris isn't.

#2 Orion58

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 08:45 AM

Do you have the mount balanced in both RA and DEC?

#3 Stew57

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 08:59 AM

AASPA works well and eliminastes the need for a polar scope. The CGEM and DX do sound a bit different slewing in one direction than the other. Just be sure your balance is correct. You could always send it to ED for a hypertune.

#4 EFT

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 10:23 AM

Adjusting the worm spacing may help to eliminate the tight spot that is causing the motor strain. There are instructions in the files section of the CGEM DX Yahoo group for doing it and it is not terribly difficult to do. I can also send them to you if you drop me an e-mail directly. You might have to increase your backlash a bit to solve the problem if the ring gear is slightly out of round, but it is fairly easy to deal with backlash.

That is the first thing to try and see if that resolves the problem. It's not likely to be a balance issue if the mount is well balanced in the first place. However, if you cannot balance the mount well you could see a similar problem if balance is significantly out. If the axes are too stiff to rotate freely, then it could be a balance problem.

The polar scope reticles are difficult to see when they are not illuminated. You have to look very hard, which is obviously not comfortable. You can shine a red flashlight toward the polar scope hole to help illuminate the reticle.

#5 Jim Romanski

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 12:05 PM

The polar scope reticles are difficult to see when they are not illuminated. You have to look very hard, which is obviously not comfortable. You can shine a red flashlight toward the polar scope hole to help illuminate the reticle.

This is how I do it. I look through the polar scope then shine my red light over the top of it to illuminate the reticle image briefly. It's not ideal but it works.

There's a thread somewhere here at CN where a clever CNer made a polar scope illuminator out of platic piping and a red led. I noticed that the new Astrophysics right angle polar scope is illuminated. Seems like something many of us could use.

#6 JMac85X

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 03:02 PM

Thanks for the feedback guys. I have been eyeballing the hypertune tune up kits from deep space products. They have a few upgrades from what I see. I'm going to do some planetary and lunar imaging, but not until after Christmas. Thinking of using an Imaging Source camera.






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