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First Binoviewers are on the way!

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#1 rflinn68

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 09:44 AM

Friday I ordered my first set of binoviewers and I have a couple questions. I ordered the William Optics kit that comes with the 66 degree 20mm eyepieces and a 1.6X barlow. Which eyepieces will work well will my scopes listed below. I will mostly be using them with the SCT's and the XT10i. Should I buy a cheap pair such as the Agenda Astro Enhanced Wide Angle ($37/ea) or would a duplicate of one I already have work well.

Secondly, and perhaps more concerning, I have read some horror stories about the binoviewers and eyepieces crashing to the ground. What would be the best way to secure the binoviewers/eyepieces to the scope. I sure dont want it to all come crashing to the ground :(

#2 Eddgie

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 10:01 AM

ES 82* 8.8,14,24mm
TMB Planetary II 6mm,9mm
AT Titan 70* 32,38mm

Green means that it should work fine.

Red of course means that it either won't work (2" barrel) or is not recommend (to short a focal lenght... Better to reach high mags with a barlow than short focal lenght eyepeieces in a binoviewer to avoid merging issues if there is any mis-alignment, which is easier to see at high powers if done by short focal lenght eyepeices(>

Securing them... My advice would be that if you are using a 2" diagonal and your current visual back does not have three screws radially on a compression ring to hold the diagonal nose in place, consider upgrading to one that does, or a Clicklock (though there has been one forum memeber has reported a Clicklock slipping).

If you turn the binos to the side, as is often necessary when viewing lower in the sky, and you use heavy eyepieces, then you do indeed risk the possibility that the Bino will rotate down suddenly.

Make sure your visual back is screwed on Tight!. Use a strap wrench if necessary to get it tight enough to ensure that it will not suddenly come loose if the bino is on the right side of the Center of gravity.

And I try to never let go of the binoviewer with on hand until I have the eyepeices locked in place. That way, if you get a rotation event, they at least won't fall out.

#3 MikeBOKC

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 10:22 AM

I always remove the binoviewer from the diagonal to change eyepieces. It's just too risky to be fiddling with the assembly while it is in the diagonal. All it takes is one slip to damage or destroy a binoviewer unit and two good eyepieces that are worth a combined $1,000.

#4 mikey cee

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 11:52 AM

Hi Richard. My WO's are great for my purposes which are planets and double stars. My oversized screws with "T" cap handles keeps everything nice and secure. I too don't trust factory single thumb screws. Also I use the Agena SWA's for $33. The 20mm 65° jobs are perfect and don't vignette. I may try the 17mm's too. I "try" to never get sucked into higher priced stuff unless I know for sure it will give me a return on my investment. My observing friends have lots of high dollar Naglers, Televues and Pentax's. I've used them all and you see what I still observe with. Any difference if it can be seen at all is very subtle at best. Only advantages or real differences to me are in the AFOV. I still don't own any by the way. ;) Mike

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#5 pftarch

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:18 PM

As I face my Mak or refractor from the rear, I make sure that my my bino's are angled to the right (clockwise) SLIGHTLY. This puts a torque on the nosepiece that causes it to tighten into the diagonal body. If you have your bino's angled to the left, you run the risk of the weight of the binos unscrewing your diagonal body from the diagonal nosepiece. I don't move them far to the right because that could introduce other problems. I use a televe adapter on my mak to go from 1.25" to 2" and it locks down wonderfully, but I check all my set screws all the time.

In your dob, unless you are holding the entire dob upside down and sideways, I can't see a way for the bino's to "fall out". Beware however of balance issues that will cause your dob to swing and slam into either the vertical or horizontal position. I don't even like mentioning the word "slam" when it comes to my scopes, because no good ever seems to come of it.

Enjoy and happy holidays.

#6 rflinn68

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 12:42 PM

On my SCT's I use my Meade 2" diagonal with the included adapter if that make a difference. Only thing that screws on is the adapter. The diagonal is a refractor style and is secured with 2 thumbscrews (no compression ring). The eyepiece end where the binoviewer will go does have a compression ring. This is my 2nd one of these diagonals. The first one came loose on the eyepiece side of the diagonal. It doesnt screw together there, I guess it is just glued. The first one I had didnt come all the way off, it just spun. This kinda worries me and I wonder if I shouldnt buy the Celestron version for SCT's only that screws on.

#7 johnnyha

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 03:20 PM

I always remove the binoviewer from the diagonal to change eyepieces. It's just too risky to be fiddling with the assembly while it is in the diagonal.

I feel the opposite, probably because I use Brandons - :grin: - its far easier to change out the super small lightweight eyepieces than to remove and replace the entire binoviewer.

#8 rflinn68

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 07:25 AM

Well these are FINALLY on the delivery truck today and I should get them this evening. Ordered these on December 21st from OPT and its been a long wait for me with all the holiday hang-ups in the shipping. Any other suggestions on eyepieces? These are supposed to come with a pair of 20mm 66 degree eyepieces and I'd like to buy at least a couple different pair. 15mm with the 1.6X barlow that comes with the kit will yield a magnification of 213X in my C8 and only 128X in my 10" dob. The 10mm would be 320X in the C8 and only 192X in the dob. I mostly use these two scopes for observing. Will it not be possible to get another 6mm TMB Planetary to get to 320X with my dob? What would be the best choice of eyepieces for these two scopes and is there an optional 2X or 3X barlow that can be used with this if need be? I am really looking forward to using these but will only have 160X mag with my C8 and 96X with my dob. Thanks for any guidance on this.

#9 rflinn68

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 09:02 AM

Well, to add to the above post, I just found the Siebert Optics website. If I am reading this correctly it looks like I can purchase this Multi-Mag corrector for $149 and have magnifications of 1.25X, 2X, 3X, and 3.5X. This may be the best way to go? http://www.siebertop...ss125xto3x.html

#10 gcfboulder

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 12:05 AM

You will need a better corrector (than the one which comes with your BV) for the BV to work well with your DOB. I don't think a corrector will be of much use in your SCT.
I have one of Siebert's "Universal" multi-mag OCAa, which works great with my Blacknight in my 12.5" DOB, but the OCA is not needed or helpful in my C8.
BTW, with the $149 unit you mentioned, the 3X setting is for refractors only, so you would get 1.25, 2 and 3.5. Frankly, there aren't a lot of occassions when viewing at 3.5 power will be enjoyable - unless you live somewhere where the skies are really steady. But I would expect the 1.25x and 2x options to be quite useful.

#11 REC

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 09:26 AM

Just an FYI, if you are using a 2" diagonal/back the 20mm are going to give you around 120x. For most nights on Moon and planets it is plenty. Adding the 1.6x will jump you up to about 200x which is my limit with my 8" SCT on most nights, so test it out on your scope before thinking about other EP's.

Have fun with your new toy:)

Bob

#12 rflinn68

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 10:11 AM

I'm loving the binoviewers. In my dob with the included 20mm eyepieces I can use the included 1.6X OCA with my 2" ED barlow and get some wonderful views. I'm not sure what the magnification is but its quite a bit. I get excellent views of Jupiter. On M42 I see a close up of the trapezium. Taking off the 1.6X and using just the 2" barlow is a better view for M42 but I still dont see the whole nebula. It wont reach focus with just the 1.6X OCA in the dob and I think the 2" 2X barlow by itself is giving me more than 2X magnification. Is this because of the distance between the barlow lens and the eyepieces? Any guess on my actual magnification?

#13 rflinn68

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 10:14 AM

With my SCT's I'm using the Meade series 5000 2" diagonal. It is a refractor type diagonal and has an adapter that screws onto the back of the SCT's. I used it the other night in my 10" Meade SCT with no OCA at all and got some fantastic views.






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