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UV Filters & Canon IS Binoculars...

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#1 SMark

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Posted 25 December 2012 - 11:27 PM

The Canon IS 10x42, 15x50, and 18x50 come threaded for filters, and I know that many have purchased a set of filters simply to protect the objectives.

When I purchased my 15x50 IS, it came with a set of 58mm polarizer filters (the previous user was a fisherman) which I don't have a lot of use for since I use this binocular for night sky observing about 80% of the time. So I chose to purchase a set of screw-on lens hoods instead (about 20mm length) to give some protection to the objectives.

So now I purchase a Canon 10x42 L IS and the previous user installed a set of B+w F-Pro UV-Haze filters over the objectives. I'm again tempted to remove them and buy a pair of lens hoods again, but is there a good reason to leave the UV filters in place? I expect to use this binocular about 50%/50% night/day...

Thanx.

#2 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 26 December 2012 - 12:07 AM

Unless you use the binos in 'gritty' environments, during use I should think the hoods would be the better option. Flat filters can be a source of reflections generated in double-pass, autocollimation. The hoods offer the possibility of reducing the amount of extra-field light scattering about.
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#3 SMark

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 07:18 PM

Thanx Glenn. I ordered myself a pair of hoods. Not very expensive and should do the job well.

#4 Three60guy

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Posted 15 August 2015 - 08:16 AM

Greetings all:

 

First post.  I just purchased and have just begun using a pair of Canon 18x50 IS Binoculars.  I live in a very light pollution infested area between Milwaukee, WI and Chicago, IL.  Hence this question:

 

Who sells 58mm light polution filters that could be used on my Canon Bins which have threads to accommodate such a filter?  (I am hoping I am correct on the 58mm size).

 

Cheers

 

Rees



#5 Vincent33

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Posted 15 August 2015 - 11:24 AM

The Canon IS 10x42, 15x50, and 18x50 come threaded for filters .....
When I purchased my 15x50 IS, it came with a set of 58mm polarizer filters (the previous user was a fisherman) which I don't have a lot of use

 

Have you ever thought of using the 58mm thread for using some optical filters? Like

http://www.ebay.it/i...=item259c15a82f

Or these ones

http://stores.ebay.i...fsub=5618989016

They are from Italy, but I have nothing to do with them. Maybe you will find some cheaper vendor ....



#6 Vincent33

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Posted 15 August 2015 - 11:39 AM

Greetings all:

 

First post.  I just purchased and have just begun using a pair of Canon 18x50 IS Binoculars.  I live in a very light pollution infested area between Milwaukee, WI and Chicago, IL.  Hence this question:

 

Who sells 58mm light polution filters that could be used on my Canon Bins which have threads to accommodate such a filter?  (I am hoping I am correct on the 58mm size).

 

Cheers

 

Rees

Yes the front thread of your binoculars is 58mm.

You can find on Amazom these:
http://www.amazon.co...llution filters

BUT I don't know what is the thread if it's 58mm or not. Ask them.

But you can buy some adapter for a little price.

Bye.



#7 Vincent33

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Posted 15 August 2015 - 12:17 PM

 

Greetings all:

 

Sorry if I said something unclair or unkind.

Bu usually when "someone" buys something, there is aways something more to buy.

 

I remember some, a lot of some, years ago, that

 

 (on magazines they said) "you can only have your 35mm reflex camera and a 50mm lens".

Then you comprised that a tripod could be useful ... a release .... an enlarger ... a good enlarger optics ... a chanching bag ...

AAAAAAAAAAAAARGH!



#8 oldmanrick

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Posted 08 September 2015 - 04:42 PM

I use both a set of haze filters next to the objectives, and metal hoods screwed into the outer end of these filter housings on my 18X50's.  I like to keep all of the dust and krud that I can off of the objectives.  Also the Canon's have such "bugeyed" objectives, or rather, I understand they are really "Objective protection lenses", that I suspect they pick up a lot of stray light, without the hoods.  I've used this setup for several years, (about 20% astro and 80% terrestrial viewing), and they seem to work well.

 

Rick



#9 cloud_cover

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Posted 13 September 2015 - 09:58 AM

When I first got my Canon 15x50IS bought a very cheap pair of uncoated protective filters from my camera shop because the high quality ones I wanted would take a few weeks to ship in. Talk about kaleidoscopic effects! Each streetlamp produced its twin in a slightly pinker shade. However after my current filters arrived (Marumi DHG Super Lens Protect), I've not seen any discernible difference in the image quality. There are the same filter types I use for my camera lenses that I occasionally do astrophotography with and there are no visible aberrations that I can see in the image that would be attributable to them. I personally prefer to leave them in front of a $1000+ optic no matter what Canon says about the lenses being tough.



#10 George9

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Posted 13 September 2015 - 11:23 PM

Greetings all:

 

First post.  I just purchased and have just begun using a pair of Canon 18x50 IS Binoculars.  I live in a very light pollution infested area between Milwaukee, WI and Chicago, IL.  Hence this question:

 

Who sells 58mm light polution filters that could be used on my Canon Bins which have threads to accommodate such a filter?  (I am hoping I am correct on the 58mm size).

 

Cheers

 

Rees

 

Sorry if this answer is a little stale now, but in case someone browses the thread. Get two 58mm to 48mm step-down rings from B&H Photo or similar (about $10) and use regular 2" astronomy light pollution filters. If you don't already own 2" light pollution filters, it may not be worth the money in light-polluted skies because there aren't that many objects big enough to see in those skies, but good for the Orion Neb, maybe Lagoon.

 

In darker skies (e.g., if you occasionally take them on trips), I find that OIII filters and UHC filters are great with the 15x50s. Then you can see the Veil, NA Neb, and similar. I use an H-beta on one side and a UHC on the other side for the California Neb (in very dark skies). These are all filters that I bought primarily for my telescope.

 

George




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