Jump to content


Photo

C2012 K5 (LINEAR)

  • Please log in to reply
58 replies to this topic

#51 ronharper

ronharper

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2205
  • Joined: 14 Feb 2006

Posted 05 January 2013 - 12:12 AM

My view tonight agrees with Daniel's last report, although with a 15x60 I couldn't see it as well as his sketch. NE to SW elongation is now evident, with the SW end concentrated. A dim star at the end of the "tail" combined with a not very transparent night left me feeling unfulfilled. Oops, shouldn't get too emotional here, try to think of those who haven't seen it at all.
Ron

#52 Man in a Tub

Man in a Tub

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10935
  • Joined: 28 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Fogpatch, CA

Posted 05 January 2013 - 05:35 AM

With the Fujinon 10x50 FMT-SX on the Garrett 2000 monopod, I pulled off a very brief view of the comet. It was dim and roundish with a ninth magnitude star to the left. Time was approximately 02:00 PST (UTC-8). The observation occurred just as large strands of wispy clouds, harbingers of the next rainstorm, were sweeping in.

Notable for this session, C/2012 K5 (Linear), Ceres and Beta Tau formed a nearly perfect equilateral triangle (about 2° on each side).

#53 Mike Lynch

Mike Lynch

    Ranger 4

  • *****
  • Posts: 315
  • Joined: 07 Apr 2006

Posted 05 January 2013 - 08:09 PM

Just a few counties northwest of Rydberg, in Frankfort, Ky., I finally managed to see LINEAR with my 80mm f/6.6 scope last night. Best view was with a 9mm Expanse eyepiece. 80 mm binocs just couldn't make it visible.

Had to keep El Nath out of the field of view to see the comet. It was little more than a slight brightening of the background darkness. Little shape was visible.

Mike Lynch
Frankfort KY USA

#54 ronharper

ronharper

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2205
  • Joined: 14 Feb 2006

Posted 06 January 2013 - 12:25 AM

Tonight, my view was free of interfering stars. The comet has faded a lot, and now although appearing larger than M1 is harder to see. The 15x60 showed only an amorphous glow. In my 6" Newt at 30x, I could see a head and a short tail. Look fast or forget about it!
Ron

#55 radiotowers

radiotowers

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 1
  • Joined: 08 Jan 2013
  • Loc: Louisa, VA

Posted 08 January 2013 - 12:39 PM

Should I be able to find this comet using an 80mm refractor (specifically, an ETX-80)? Would assume so based on the types of binoculars people are reporting seeing it with, but didn't have any luck finding it last night. Although admittedly I didn't spend much time on it.

#56 Mr. Bill

Mr. Bill

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6106
  • Joined: 09 Feb 2005
  • Loc: Northeastern Cal

Posted 08 January 2013 - 04:41 PM

Give it a look tonight....first clear day in a while.

Will try to recover with 6 inch f/5 and Binoviewers...hey, its binocular viewing if not binoculars.

:cool:

Attached Files



#57 ronharper

ronharper

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2205
  • Joined: 14 Feb 2006

Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:13 AM

Tonight I found the comet pretty easily with 10x56. I kept thinking I saw a vague brightening inside, and 15x60 confirmed this impression. The way it had been dimming the last few days, this surprised me. I looked at other things for a while, and when I returned to the comet, it had moved clear of the brightening. So, almost fooled by a star. Now I realized that the star had falsely reinforced the view. Standing alone, the comet was much dimmer. It is now smaller than M1, and considerably harder to see.
Ron

#58 ronharper

ronharper

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Posts: 2205
  • Joined: 14 Feb 2006

Posted 10 January 2013 - 11:30 AM

Last night conditions were pretty good, but I failed to find the comet with a 15x60. I searched probably 10 minutes nonstop, and more scattered over an hour long session.

Lately I've noticed a difficulty that never bothered me much before. A very dim star will appear not as a point of light but as a small blur. Arduous averted vision may or may not reveal a tendency of light to momentarily concentrate within the blur. A search for a dim extended, but small, object is likely to be inconclusive--at the threshold of visibility, you can't be sure you're not looking at a star.

That might be "Deep Sky 101", but I'm newly impressed by it. Comets are sort of an exception. Last night, my only candidate for the comet failed to move--not good! It was fun anyhow. Exciting even. Can somebody explain that?
Ron

#59 Special Ed

Special Ed

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6953
  • Joined: 18 May 2003
  • Loc: Greenbrier Co., WV 38N, 80W

Posted 14 January 2013 - 10:07 PM

Hi,

Good to see so many binocular comet observations. This was a good one and you will seldom see one with so rapid a movement.

I looked for it the evening of the 12th (13th UT) with my 12x36 IS II's but was unable to detect it. I had a good chart from Skyhound and was looking at the right spot. Transparency was poor which was a contributing factor but it may have faded enough so that it is beyond the reach of those binoculars.






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics