Jump to content


Photo

Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas

  • Please log in to reply
49 replies to this topic

#1 Rick Woods

Rick Woods

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 14395
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Inner Solar System

Posted 28 December 2012 - 07:59 PM

I've searched back a few months in this forum and can't find a thread on this.

Can someone who owns this book tell me how comprehensive it really is? I know it's somewhere between Rukl and Kaguya in coverage; but what actually is covered - how much of the Moon? How many pages is it? And, is there a key chart like most lunar atlases have? Is there any standardization, as in all the images being at the same sun angle, and things like that? Does it cover the far side? Are the images in order, so that you can get a continuous progression of adjacent images?

Thanks!

#2 Sarkikos

Sarkikos

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 16204
  • Joined: 18 Dec 2007
  • Loc: Per sylvam ad astra

Posted 28 December 2012 - 08:16 PM

That's one Moon atlas I don't have.

Mike

#3 RobertED

RobertED

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3198
  • Joined: 11 Jul 2003
  • Loc: Smithfield, RI

Posted 28 December 2012 - 08:47 PM

The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas
#5459844 - 10/07/12 08:49 PM
@Rick.....there's a pretty informative thread in the LUNAR OBSERVING dept.!!!....Hope this helps!!

#4 simpleisbetter

simpleisbetter

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1848
  • Joined: 18 Apr 2011

Posted 28 December 2012 - 11:32 PM

The Cambridge is an excellent book Rick, though I don't classify it as an atlas in the traditional sense; it's more of a cross between an atlas and Chu's "Photographic Moon Book", with more detail and coverage. I believe this is the link you were looking for: Cambridge Atlas thread

It's graphics and pictures are excellent quality, almost as detailed as the Kaguya. But unlike Kaguya it has 100% coverage of the nearside of the Moon with detailed info and images on the more prominent regions. It's printed and bound on an oversize 10" x 14" format so the images are larger than if on a std 8.5" x 11". All in all, well worth the money. Just IMHO I find Rukl and Cambridge Atlases are about all I need for the Moon; they go side by side and complement each other well. Of course I have more, but they're just bonus material next to the Rukl/Cambridge combo.

#5 simpleisbetter

simpleisbetter

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1848
  • Joined: 18 Apr 2011

Posted 28 December 2012 - 11:49 PM

You asked about pages, there are 191 pages inside, including the index. And the front and back inside covers both have photos of five various phases from waxing cresent to full, with pointers to the specific page where a notable feature or crater can be found.

#6 Rick Woods

Rick Woods

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 14395
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Inner Solar System

Posted 29 December 2012 - 02:38 AM

Thanks guys.
Robert, I found that thread after I had already started this one; but it didn't really answer my question about coverage. But Steve says 100% near-side coverage, which is what I was hoping for.
Guess I'll be firing up the ol' credit card here pretty quick.

#7 Sarkikos

Sarkikos

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 16204
  • Joined: 18 Dec 2007
  • Loc: Per sylvam ad astra

Posted 29 December 2012 - 09:46 AM

Rick,

I wonder how the CPMA compares to the Photographic Moon Book that can be downloaded as a PDF file? They are both written by Alan Chu. AFAIK, no one has brought this up. I am very surprised that this has not come up either in this CN thread or the other one cited. :foreheadslap:

Here's the link to Chu's PDF Moon Atlas:

Alan Chu's Photographic Moon Book

For those unfamiliar with this free publication, it is a photographic guidebook to the moon containing nearly 300 annotated images of lunar features with complete feature descriptions in 33 map sections--- and too much more useful information to list here. It is an excellent (I feel the very best available, free or otherwise) observer's guide to our Moon. The latest is the version released Mar. 2011. 257 pages.


Mike

#8 Sarkikos

Sarkikos

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 16204
  • Joined: 18 Dec 2007
  • Loc: Per sylvam ad astra

Posted 29 December 2012 - 09:48 AM

By the way, I have a Barnes & Nobles $50 gift card that I'm looking to burn through. I wonder if I should go for the CPMA? I've already ordered Charles Wood's new Moon Atlas. When does one have too many lunar atlases? Maybe I should buy yet another book on the Messiers instead? :thinking:

:grin:
Mike

#9 simpleisbetter

simpleisbetter

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1848
  • Joined: 18 Apr 2011

Posted 29 December 2012 - 10:28 AM

Rick,

I wonder how the CPMA compares to the Photographic Moon Book that can be downloaded as a PDF file? They are both written by Alan Chu. AFAIK, no one has brought this up. I am very surprised that this has not come up either in this CN thread or the other one cited. :foreheadslap:

Here's the link to Chu's PDF Moon Atlas:

Alan Chu's Photographic Moon Book

For those unfamiliar with this free publication, it is a photographic guidebook to the moon containing nearly 300 annotated images of lunar features with complete feature descriptions in 33 map sections--- and too much more useful information to list here. It is an excellent (I feel the very best available, free or otherwise) observer's guide to our Moon. The latest is the version released Mar. 2011. 257 pages.


Mike


Mike,

My posts above Ricks might answer your question. I did just bring it up and address that to a point. The Cambridge is not an atlas in the traditional sense, but more of a cross between the Photographic Moonbook and a regular atlas. It's also, at 10x14, a larger printed and bound format allowing better quality pictures than in the Moonbook.

The Photographic Moonbook, seems to me more of a detailed reference book or encyclopedia including geologic information, whereas the Cambridge is more "atlas-like", with better photos and without all the encyclopedia of info.

#10 Sarkikos

Sarkikos

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 16204
  • Joined: 18 Dec 2007
  • Loc: Per sylvam ad astra

Posted 29 December 2012 - 11:00 AM

Steve,

Yes, sorry. I see now that you did mention it above. I was wondering if Chu's PDF was sort of a dress rehearsal for the printed Atlas. But it seems they are different critters after all.

Mike

#11 simpleisbetter

simpleisbetter

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1848
  • Joined: 18 Apr 2011

Posted 29 December 2012 - 11:17 AM

I wonder about that too, and don't know either Mike. I've also wondered if the photo quality would be better if a professional printer and better quality glossy stock paper would improve the Moonbook. Unfortunately, I don't have the money to test it.

#12 edwincjones

edwincjones

    Close Enough

  • *****
  • Posts: 8613
  • Joined: 10 Apr 2004

Posted 29 December 2012 - 05:53 PM

... When does one have too many lunar atlases?

:grin:
Mike


:question:

#13 desertstars

desertstars

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 42741
  • Joined: 05 Nov 2003
  • Loc: Tucson, AZ

Posted 29 December 2012 - 10:29 PM

The Cambridge is an excellent book Rick, though I don't classify it as an atlas in the traditional sense; it's more of a cross between an atlas and Chu's "Photographic Moon Book", with more detail and coverage. I believe this is the link you were looking for: Cambridge Atlas thread

It's graphics and pictures are excellent quality, almost as detailed as the Kaguya. But unlike Kaguya it has 100% coverage of the nearside of the Moon with detailed info and images on the more prominent regions. It's printed and bound on an oversize 10" x 14" format so the images are larger than if on a std 8.5" x 11". All in all, well worth the money. Just IMHO I find Rukl and Cambridge Atlases are about all I need for the Moon; they go side by side and complement each other well. Of course I have more, but they're just bonus material next to the Rukl/Cambridge combo.


I can easily see myself using this book as Steve describes. Received a copy as a holiday gift. I'm still reading the text up front (very basic stuff, but nicely presented and should be very good for new lunar observers), but I've taken a good look through it and am very impressed. CPMA and Rukl's atlas are likely to be my guides of choice in the near future.

The catch is the size of CPMA. Need to leave lots of room on the observing table, or find some way to prop it up and open. A heavy-duty copy holder or an old music stand would do the trick.

#14 Rick Woods

Rick Woods

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 14395
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Inner Solar System

Posted 30 December 2012 - 02:23 AM

When does one have too many lunar atlases?


Seriously, one can't; the Moon changes its appearance in a matter of minutes, and each atlas is either a compromise, or a view at a given moment. The identification or investigation of a particular feature can depend on having a representation of it under the right conditions. The more reference points you have, the better the chance of having what you need.

I have Alan Chu's Moon Book; but, I'm just not an electronic book guy. I relate far better to printed material.

#15 RobertED

RobertED

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3198
  • Joined: 11 Jul 2003
  • Loc: Smithfield, RI

Posted 30 December 2012 - 09:48 AM

Thanks guys.
Robert, I found that thread after I had already started this one; but it didn't really answer my question about coverage. But Steve says 100% near-side coverage, which is what I was hoping for.
Guess I'll be firing up the ol' credit card here pretty quick.


I highly recommend this book, man!! You won't be sorry!! My favorite part, is the gorgeous photography!!!!

#16 RobertED

RobertED

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3198
  • Joined: 11 Jul 2003
  • Loc: Smithfield, RI

Posted 30 December 2012 - 09:53 AM

When does one have too many lunar atlases?


Seriously, one can't; the Moon changes its appearance in a matter of minutes, and each atlas is either a compromise, or a view at a given moment. The identification or investigation of a particular feature can depend on having a representation of it under the right conditions. The more reference points you have, the better the chance of having what you need.

I have Alan Chu's Moon Book; but, I'm just not an electronic book guy. I relate far better to printed material.


Totally with you, Rick!! Books are COOOOLL!!!! ....especially the "Old School" copies!!!

....uh, by the way!...what does "When does one have too many lunar atlases?"...mean???? :question:

#17 Sarkikos

Sarkikos

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 16204
  • Joined: 18 Dec 2007
  • Loc: Per sylvam ad astra

Posted 30 December 2012 - 10:40 AM

Well, I may have reached the saturation point in lunar atlases. I passed on the CPMA. I must already have at least a dozen lunar atlases.

I had a $50 gift card for Barnes & Nobles. I bought "Cosmic Challenge: The Ultimate Observing List for Amateurs" and "Deep-Sky Companions: The Messier Objects." I only have about four books on the Messiers. Besides, my copy of Wood's "Lunar Atlas" is on it's way. Enough is enough.

:grin:
Mike

#18 desertstars

desertstars

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 42741
  • Joined: 05 Nov 2003
  • Loc: Tucson, AZ

Posted 30 December 2012 - 12:57 PM

Enough is enough.



Careful... I said that about eyepieces once, and a crowd of people came after me with torches and pitchforks... :help:

#19 Sarkikos

Sarkikos

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 16204
  • Joined: 18 Dec 2007
  • Loc: Per sylvam ad astra

Posted 30 December 2012 - 03:01 PM

Even Jim Barnett, the Eyepiece Hooligan, has thinned out his herd. Rumor is he has only about 200 eyepieces now.

:grin:
Mike

#20 desertstars

desertstars

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 42741
  • Joined: 05 Nov 2003
  • Loc: Tucson, AZ

Posted 30 December 2012 - 04:55 PM

Erm, as I recall, he was leading the mob. Well, not leading, exactly. More like standing back at a safe distance and urging them on.

....uh, by the way!...what does "When does one have too many lunar atlases?"...mean????


Dude, seriously, don't ask me! :help: :lol:

#21 RobertED

RobertED

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3198
  • Joined: 11 Jul 2003
  • Loc: Smithfield, RI

Posted 30 December 2012 - 05:55 PM

Nyuk, nyuk, nyuk!!....lol... :lol: :stooges: :lol:

#22 Sarkikos

Sarkikos

    Hubble

  • *****
  • Posts: 16204
  • Joined: 18 Dec 2007
  • Loc: Per sylvam ad astra

Posted 30 December 2012 - 09:41 PM

Erm, as I recall, he was leading the mob. Well, not leading, exactly. More like standing back at a safe distance and urging them on.


Maybe he was merely priming the mob to buy up his own cullings when the time came? I'm just sayin'...

:grin:
Mike

#23 desertstars

desertstars

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 42741
  • Joined: 05 Nov 2003
  • Loc: Tucson, AZ

Posted 30 December 2012 - 10:17 PM

Having had a chance, now, to take a long and detailed look at this new lunar offering...

Yo, Rick! What are you waiting for? :grin:

Seriously, this is a worthy addition to the overburdened bookshelf.

#24 turtle86

turtle86

    Pooh-Bah Everywhere Else

  • *****
  • Posts: 2950
  • Joined: 09 Oct 2006

Posted 31 December 2012 - 10:01 AM

Having had a chance, now, to take a long and detailed look at this new lunar offering...

Yo, Rick! What are you waiting for? :grin:

Seriously, this is a worthy addition to the overburdened bookshelf.


I agree. I already have Rukl, so I figure that once my copy of Wood's 21st Century Atlas of the Moon comes in the mail, I'll have all I could ever want in lunar atlases, well at least until the next uber-awesome one comes along. :grin:

#25 Rick Woods

Rick Woods

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 14395
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Inner Solar System

Posted 31 December 2012 - 01:28 PM

Having had a chance, now, to take a long and detailed look at this new lunar offering...

Yo, Rick! What are you waiting for? :grin:

Seriously, this is a worthy addition to the overburdened bookshelf.


I agree. I already have Rukl, so I figure that once my copy of Wood's 21st Century Atlas of the Moon comes in the mail, I'll have all I could ever want in lunar atlases, well at least until the next uber-awesome one comes along. :grin:


I'll order it this week. There was never really any doubt, I suppose.

Rob: I'm gonna call your bluff: Do you have the "Times Atlas of the Moon"?
No?? (Hmph! - all the atlases you could ever want, indeed!) ;)






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics