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5 Galilean Moons?

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#1 rydberg

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 11:06 PM

Well, not really, but it sure looked that way...

Tonight (10:35 EST) I trained my Canon 15x50 toward Jupiter.
Nice little orb, not much flaring, very nice. One, two, three Little Galilean Moon on the left and ...two more to the right??
A quick check with Stellarium showed that I had Io, Europa and Ganymede on the left (mag 5.48, 5.08 and 5.76 respectively), Callisto on the right (Mag 6.08) and smack dab on the plane of the Moon orbits, between Callisto and Jupiter, a tiny little Star (HIP 20417 A, Mag 6.0, 1753 light years away). Stars do appear to be between the Galilean satellites, but not often they are just as bright as them. It surely looked like Jupiter had sprouted an extra Moon!

By the way, all this handheld with no tripod. Isn't IS grand? :)
Marco

#2 StarStuff1

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 11:15 PM

I don't have IS binos but I'm sure it is grand. It seems like Ol' Jupe's major moons lines up with random stars on a regular basis. Neat to see. What would have Galileo thought...the next night?

#3 Lou3

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 11:24 PM

Because of the light pollution in my area, tonight was my first time seeing the moons. I didn't think my 7x35 would be up to it. Thank goodness for clear winter nights. I also observed them with a Vista 8x42, which showed them very nicely - when I could stay still enough. I was indeed thinking that IS would be grand.

#4 ScumotheUniverse

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 11:56 PM

This article will allay any misperception that you are viewing a fifth Galilean Satellite. It is a difficult prospect even telescopically. http://www.astronomy.net/articles/18/

Lest we not forget that Galileo did very well without IS.

#5 stevetaylor199

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 12:03 AM

Heh, I saw that fifth moon too, though it was last night. It's fun to know I wasn't the only one who did a double take.

#6 BillC

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 12:03 AM

"... a tiny little Star (HIP 20417 A, Mag 6.0, 1753 light years away)."

Yeah, Yeah, you Italians (or being from Kain Tuck, I-tallians) have been tryin' to get a plug in for "LITTLE STAR" since the Elegants launched the idea in . . . 1958. Anyway, while I would like to see it, 1,753 light years is too far to walk!

Cheers, and have a great new year, you old college . . . person, you.

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#7 ronharper

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 12:21 AM

I saw this too. ...Callisto, and Daisy Mae. It was so perfect!
Ron

#8 Man in a Tub

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 02:40 AM

Right now Davis' Dog is playing with Jupiter and its moons.

#9 ianatcn

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 04:35 AM

Hi Marco,

When I was out tracking down comet linear on 1st Jan I turned my 20x60s on Jupiter and saw the 5th moon. As you said it was dead in line and also a similar magnitude to give the illusion. There were also several fainter field stars around which gave the whole view a lovely three dimensional feel. I am with you on image stabilisation, it is hard to beat when you have to grab a quick look between clouds.

Ian

#10 Simon S

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 09:51 AM

Me too. I was trying out my new Celestron 25x100 and thought they were better than i'd expected.

#11 Rich V.

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:36 AM

I've seen 5 Saturnian moons in 71x100 binos and they all really were moons!

Now there's a binocular challenge for you!:rockon:

Rich

#12 SMark

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 12:38 PM

I've seen 5 Saturnian moons in 71x100 binos and they all really were moons!

Now there's a binocular challenge for you!:rockon:

Rich


... :jawdrop: :bow:

#13 Sonomajfk

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 02:00 AM

I watched Jupiter for a while tonight also, with 15x70s (on a tripod)and saw the 5th "moon" as well! Came inside to check the moon positions; glad I looked at this thread first! I knew it was either a well-positioned star or a funky internal reflection. Glad to confirm it was really there. Haze and clouds quickly obscured the whole scene.

#14 daniel_h

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 04:19 AM

i saw the same thing in my 25x100 while waiting for my yes to get dk adapted before checking out comet LINEAR -freaky

#15 dpwoos

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 08:57 AM

Do the moons look non-stellar in binos, as opposed to background stars? They certainly do in a scope, even using very low magnification. In fact, at public viewing events I often suggest to the more interested folks that they try and determine the relative sizes of the moons, which they more often than not get correct.

#16 Rich_W

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 09:28 AM

Same sight here, last night with my 15 x 50s. I was looking for double stars in Taurus and took a glance up at Jupiter and ... whoa, what am I seeing? Love it when you get an unexpected treat like that.

#17 Sonomajfk

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 02:50 PM

Last night, with my 15x70's, I couldn't pick out which 4 objects were the moons and which was stellar; I'll have to try that again when the opportunity comes along. I know I can tell in the telescope.

#18 dpwoos

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 03:30 PM

I know that I can tell that Neptune is a planet at 50x, and Ganymede's angular diameter isn't much less. I haven't had my 20x80 binos out for a while - something for me to check out with them, too.

#19 Pinewood

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 08:52 PM

Same sight here, last night with my 15 x 50s. I was looking for double stars in Taurus and took a glance up at Jupiter and ... whoa, what am I seeing? Love it when you get an unexpected treat like that.

Hello,
Five with the 12x50, last night.
IIRC Galileo actually saw Uranus one night, but did not realize that it was a planet. I believe that in the current slang that star would count as a "photobomb."

Clear skies,
Arthur Pinewood

#20 Dennis_S253

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 09:40 PM

Funny story, a few years ago I was on a different forum and was making a comment about showing some family members 5 or 6 of Jupiters moons. "They" quickly told me I only seen 4. Thats when I downloaded Stellarium and started researching stuff. Clear skies...






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