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#1 squirrels

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 02:56 PM

I am new into taking images and I am wondering if a fringe killer, semi-apo, etc would be a worthwhile investment for taking pictures. Currently I get pictures of a bright blue dot when imaging Jupiter.

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#2 Mike7Mak

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 04:18 PM

I'd say it depends on what you're imaging through. That shot of Jupiter is way overexposed so the blue halo might not be quite that bad with proper exposure. But if you're shooting through an achromat then yes one of the 'minus violet' type of filters would probably help.

#3 NeilMac

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:07 PM

Also look at exposure compensation button and drop it to -2 or whatever range it has.

#4 squirrels

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 09:03 PM

Ah - I'll have to give that a try.... Very new to both changing exposure and shooting through the telescope.

It is an achromat - so good to hear that filters should help.

Thank you for the replies!

#5 NeilMac

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 12:50 PM

If u have a scn selection I put mine on Landscape for shorter exposures and switch it to Fireworks for longer exposures when doing just stars.

#6 NeilMac

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 06:12 PM

I forgot to mention that it would be wise to use spot metering, if u dont it will average out the whole image and since its black it will overexpose. So make sure you aim the spot on Jupiter.

#7 Ratchet

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:29 AM

I looked at the jpeg properties and 3.2" is going to overexpose quite a bit on Jupiter. You can also drop the ISO down a little since Jupiter is so bright. I would start around 1/250" shutter at ~ISO400 in manual mode and bracket (adjust exposure times up and down) until you find the best exposure. With higher ISO you can use shorter exposures and "freeze" seeing, but with more noise. You will have to experiment to find a balance between noise and seeing.

The halo should greatly diminish, but may not disappear. Also, to expose Jupiter properly means you will probably underexpose the Galilean moons to the point where they disappear.

#8 squirrels

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 08:25 PM

Thank you all for the help! This has been very helpful - I still have a long way to go, but I am getting closer to what I want on the image. Here is the evenings work (its dropped to under 10F outside and the wind has kicked up, but here is the improvement! I think I'll need to play with ISO to reduce the noise.

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#9 NeilMac

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 12:37 PM

Looking better :)
This is were its hand to have a release cable and start snapping 30 pics and dark frames to enter into Registax

#10 bouffetout

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 08:06 PM

I see details on that Jupiter...Maybe you should tell us what you use and other technical details .
If you have a webcam you can use ,taking 30 seconds videos and processing them in registax 6 gives really good results.
On youtube you can see how to modify a webcam for astrophoto ,it's very simple !
Good luck,have fun and clear skys to you !
Maxx






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