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Any other mounts besides a parallelogram?

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#1 wky46

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Posted 06 January 2013 - 11:00 PM

Looking to build a parallelogram mount for my 20x80's but just wondering if there are any other practical designs out there before I start. I'm thinking maybe something like a shoulder harness design or a simple arm holding the binocular with the weight transferring to ones chest. Or maybe even a simple but functional monopod. What else is out there for heavier binos? Thanks, Phil

#2 daniel_h

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 12:19 AM

Do you want to use them sitting or standing, monopod would only be useful for short looks with a 20x80 I would think
Gary seronik on his website has a counterbalanced mount without the UP/down that a p-mount provides' useful for sitting only
Instead of p mint you could just use tripod/fluid head

#3 Jawaid I. Abbasi

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 01:12 AM

If you can take pain in your neck area while observing over 65-70 degree using azimuth-alt mount then buy a mount that at least double or triple capacity.

A monopod is still better but building a P-mount is really a fun (I know because I built three P-mount)
Have fun

#4 wky46

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 08:48 AM

Sorry, yes I meant to say I mainly like to view sitting and lying, hence the parallelogram. However, with maybe a shoulder harness type mounting system it would certainly provide more mobility. Probably will go with the traditional P-mount but thought there might be some ideas where people were thinking outside the box.....Phil

#5 Mike Lynch

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 09:11 AM

I agree with Jawaid... I built a parallelogram mount, and it works well for me!

But you might search this site for an article by Ed Zarenski entitled "Binocular Mounts, Tripods & Mounting." He shows several ideas for mounting binoculars.

I hope this URL (from THIS Web site!) for that article comes through:
http://www.cloudynig...hp?item_id=1344

I bought a cradle specifically for putting on a tripod with a Bogen head I bought from Ed. The head is pictured in the 7th and 8th photos at that article's page. The cradle shown in those pictures is no longer available from ScopeStuff, incidentally.

But, as Jawaid points out, this can be a pain in the neck when observing objects pretty high in the sky!

Mike Lynch
Frankfort KY USA

#6 Don M

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:24 AM

Hi Phil, This may not be what you have in mind, however, the StarRocker works well for me and
provides a 'crazy fun' type of freedom and comfort! 10 x 50, 15 x 70, 20 x 80's. StarRocker - CN Rocks! :cool:
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#7 wky46

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 07:29 PM

Don, that is absolutely the coolest thing EVER (and your star seeker) :cool: I don't know if you remember, but I ran across your old thread kinda recently and emailed you about the star rocker. I'm going to look at those pics in the other thread a little closer and may attempt something similar. Awesome Don, thanks for the reminder ..... Phil

#8 Gordon Rayner

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 01:12 AM

An inertially stabilized, shoulder supported mount allows sitting, and views up to near the zenith, if the stabilizer pole is in front, and a counterweight is behind the head.

The original(?) presented by Alan MacRobert in Sky and Telescope, and available on their website, used stabilizer beams behind the head, which interfere with the ground in a chair of normal height.

20x is probably too much, but certainly better than handheld , and your neck will be comfortable.

An eight or ten foot painter's extension pole (Home Depot, etc) gives very considerable stabilization up to 12X-15X, and improves the stability of a Canon 15 x 50 ( which is already very stable).

There are some crude pics in my gallery. A search, using "inertial" brought up relevant previous posts.

I =mr^2. Inertia/mass is maximized by pole length, rather than by putting weight on the end of the pole. Think of the balance pole of a tightrope walker-- no masses on the pole ends.

Such an inertial stabilizer is intermediate in stability between handheld-braced and a rigid mount. It is convenient for grab and go use near the zenith , for low magnifications, the more if an ordinary chair is available .

A sidesaddle p-mount with multiple axes, including a hinge as a secondary azimuth axis, and a lawnchair, is a good way to go for a straight binocular. But setting up the tripod and chair and mounting the counterweight and binocular are slower than grab-and -go.

The p-mount components seem more modular than the elegant, dedicated chairs such as the one pictured above. Such a chair must be the best method, if for a fixed location, or if there is enough space in a transport vehicle.


Another possibilty is to use a tripod with a fast adjustable center column. The Quick-Set Hercules is very rigid, but the gear ratio chosen for up-down makes it slow.

A fork -in -a fork, or a half-fork in a half-fork ( an L inside another L) can be used for higher angles if the arms are long and/or the outer fork or half-fork arm(s) is swept back ( consistent with keeping the center of gravity inboard of the lines connecting the tips of the tripod legs, to avoid tipover crashes).

But that construction will not relieve neck discomfort at high angles with a straight view binocular.

#9 GaryS

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 11:22 AM

I put an article up on my web page yesterday describing my monopod binocular mount. It's easy to build -- you can probably put one together in an evening and you can buy most of the parts needed. Check it out.

I also like Alan MacRobert's binocular ladder -- simple and effective. (Details are on the S&T web site.)

So yes, there are good alternatives to the tried-and-true parallelogram mount!

Gary

#10 wky46

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 11:40 AM

Wow, thanks Gary! Being I'm quite simple, I think that's something that I'd like to tackle. With so much money invested in glass, I've gotta do something. Even hand-holding 10x50's at night is actually quite a useless endeavor for me.

#11 SMark

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 04:42 PM

I think I might also tackle that little mount project. I would put something like that to very good use.

Thank you Gary!! :bow:

#12 Photobud

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 04:52 PM

Great! Went to that article and have added it to my favorites so I can build one, too.

I put an article up on my web page yesterday describing my monopod binocular mount. It's easy to build -- you can probably put one together in an evening and you can buy most of the parts needed. Check it out.

I also like Alan MacRobert's binocular ladder -- simple and effective. (Details are on the S&T web site.)

So yes, there are good alternatives to the tried-and-true parallelogram mount!

Gary



#13 Andresin150

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 06:59 PM

The Starchair 3000 is waiting for you guys! :)

In december, it proved to be of great help and confort to a friend that is partially disabled... For me, my usual muscular back pain totally justifies it.
It is expensive, very expensive, but is amazing and a life time investment... So with continuous use it will pay itself soon.. Like premium optics....

#14 wky46

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 07:53 PM

:jawdrop: Man, I wish!

#15 Gordon Rayner

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:39 AM

The inertial mount design by MacRobert has an important limitation:

That shortcoming is the limitation of the stabilizer ladder's rearward length to no more than the distance to the ground from the shoulders, when viewing at or near to the zenith. The moment of inertia ( resistance to rotation) is I=(mL^2)/3, where L is the length of the ladder or pole from the shoulders, in one direction, forward or backward, and m is the mass of the part of the ladder or pole which lies outboard of the shoulders, in that same direction.

That distance, L, can be no more than about six feet, or two meters, for a standing giant. If the observer is seated, for comfort and stability, that length , for zenith area use, can be no more than from the ground to a few inches above the chair back height.

But if the stabilizing element(s) is a ladder or pole, such as an extendible painter's pole, forward of the observer, the stabilizer(s) can be eight feet or more in length. A rearward part of the ladder, or a board, is positioned behind the observer, as a counterweight which also adds more
inertial stability, though less than the inertia contribution of the long front pole or ladder portion which it balances.

I tried bamboo and carbon fiber front mounted poles. Storage , transport, and vibration make more than about 10 feet long front poles impractical. An eight or ten foot aluminum telescoping painter's extension pole was the most satisfactory.

#16 Goodchild

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 11:41 AM

Take a look at JKoelman's design. It doesn't get any simpler or practical.

http://www.cloudynig...d=binoculars...

#17 wky46

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:02 PM

Thanks for the great ideas all! Royce, that would be something to think about using my 10x50's. As he said, 20x80 and heavier would probably be too heavy. However, it may just work with my hard, dense head :bangbangbang:....Phil

#18 wky46

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 12:06 PM

Gordon, though mathematics isn't my strong suit, I'm definately looking into incorporating a painters extension pole into some type of monopod design now. Thanks.... Phil

#19 Unknownastron

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 11:55 PM

I have a professionally made parallelogram, a homemade parallelogram for lighter binos and a couch potato bino chair. I find myself using the couch potato most of all.
Clear skies and clean glass,
Mike

#20 salientbunny

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 12:39 PM

The Manfrotto magic arm and my zero gravity chair work pretty well for me.

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#21 SMark

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:26 PM

salientbunny...

How much weight can that effectively hold?

#22 salientbunny

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 01:39 PM

The magic arm is rated at 15kg, so about 30lbs. I have not used anything other than these Nikon AE 10x50s on it so far.

#23 wky46

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 02:54 PM

What kind of bracket are you using to attach the binoculars to the magic arm salientbunny? There's several models that I see but is it just the camera bracket that comes with it? That's intriguing if it fits my pocket book. Thanks, Phil

#24 salientbunny

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 03:23 PM

The Manfrotto Super Clamp, sold separately from the Magic Arm.

#25 salientbunny

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 03:30 PM

sorry, I guess I miss read. Yes, I am just using the bracket that came with the Magic Arm and a tripod adapter I already had on hand to mount the binoculars.






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