Jump to content


Photo

Five galaxies on a night of good transparency

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 tnakazon

tnakazon

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 345
  • Joined: 26 Jun 2010
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 07 January 2013 - 11:01 PM

I logged 5 "new" galaxies with my 3.9" Orion Skyscanner Friday night (1-4-13) on a cold but clear night with very good transparency at my usual orange-zone Malibu site:

NGC 772 Ari 10.4 14.0 7.2x4.3
NGC 972 Ari 11.4 13.1 3.3x1.7
NGC1600 Eri 10.9 12.3 2.5x1.8
NGC1637 Eri 11.2 13.4 3.3x2.9
NGC 741 Psc 11.5 13.8 3.0x2.9

Specs above refer to object name, constellation, visual mag., surface brightness, and size.

Out of these five, only NGC772 was visible with direct vision at 44X (9mm Expanse EP). The other four smaller galaxies required 88X (9mm Expanse + 2X Barlow) along with averted vision and careful panning of the scope. A good detailed atlas (i.e. Tri-Atlas B) is required to know exactly where to focus one's gaze when seeking out galaxies of this magnitude and size, especially when using such a small scope.

More humid conditions in December (my scope would dew up within an hour) would not have allowed me to detect any of these five galaxies if I'd tried back then.

Attached Files



#2 uniondrone

uniondrone

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1873
  • Joined: 05 Dec 2009
  • Loc: Streetlight Archipelago

Posted 08 January 2013 - 01:52 PM


That's pretty good! I have a hard time finding NGC 772 from my orange zone site using my 10" dob.

#3 tnakazon

tnakazon

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 345
  • Joined: 26 Jun 2010
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 08 January 2013 - 02:51 PM

I wasn't expecting NGC 772 to be relatively easy, given its low surface brightness. But I guess the large size and overall visual magnitude of 10.4 sort of made up for it.

Aries is pretty high in the sky from my location in Malibu, CA (34°3'8" N). Also, the southern half of the sky from my site faces the Pacific Ocean, so there is little haze from light pollution in that direction.

#4 norton67

norton67

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 74
  • Joined: 11 Dec 2012
  • Loc: Michigan

Posted 11 January 2013 - 03:46 PM

Are you set up in the middle of the road?

#5 CelestronDaddy

CelestronDaddy

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 897
  • Joined: 21 Aug 2009
  • Loc: Central Texas

Posted 11 January 2013 - 04:01 PM

Nice catches :grin: Tony

#6 tnakazon

tnakazon

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 345
  • Joined: 26 Jun 2010
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 12 January 2013 - 02:02 AM

Are you set up in the middle of the road?


Yup, it's the road that leads into Solstice Canyon, a National Park in Malibu, California. Fortunately, the park is closed for traffic after dusk.

Malibu is the easiest place to get to for semi-dark skies in Los Angeles.

#7 tnakazon

tnakazon

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 345
  • Joined: 26 Jun 2010
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 12 January 2013 - 02:05 AM

Nice catches :grin: Tony

Thanks. Galaxies are my favorite DSO's, even though they're the hardest to observe, especially with a small scope.

#8 geminijk

geminijk

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 910
  • Joined: 03 Apr 2008
  • Loc: Murfreesboro, TN

Posted 01 February 2013 - 11:15 PM

Nice accomplishments!

John

#9 tnakazon

tnakazon

    Ranger 4

  • -----
  • Posts: 345
  • Joined: 26 Jun 2010
  • Loc: Los Angeles

Posted 02 February 2013 - 03:44 AM

Thanks John. Finding new galaxies to observe/detect with this 3.9" (100mm) scope is tough now, since I've seen nearly all of the brighter ones in the past 2 years of galaxy hunting. So lately I've been concentrating on open clusters, which I've neglected up until now. Easier to find and observe, but sketching them can be very time-consuming.






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics