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#1 northernontario

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 07:49 PM

I got out on Sunday.

Sunday was really nice. A bit on the cold side, but skies were great.

M33 was easily found with the 24 mm. I could see some loose structure scattered here and there in patches.

With 18 mm UWA and it all started to come together.

I also noticed some areas are dense than others. I explored around the edges, and to my right, there was a star and some fuzzy stuff below it.

I initially thought I was out of focus, but twas all good. I put in a 14mm and the star was still a star, but the fuzz remained. So I went 8.8 and had the same results.

An extra galaxy object, perhaps a dense open cluster within M33, maybe a nebula...I continued my tour around the outer edges of the galaxy. Some denser patches showed up here and there, then I went back the 24 mm, then back to the 18, then an 11 mm plossl.....

And when I finally snapped out of it, it occurred to me that I was in M33 for close to an hour.

I won't tell you how much time I spent in M42, suffice to say that in a 6 hour session, I may have hit about 15 objects. M51 and 81 and 82 really stood out as well.

An hour on M33.....seems normal to me. :foreheadslap:

jake

#2 Ed D

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 08:21 PM

On my last dark sky outing I spent half the night on M33, so an hour doesn't seem like that long. To each his own, but Messier Marathons and hopping from one object to the next have never appealed to me.

Here's a link to the sketch of M33 I posted from that outing. Look familiar?

It takes time to see detail. You're doing great. :waytogo:

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#3 Dennis_S253

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 10:21 PM

I remember the first time I looked for M33. I was looking and looking and looking. I kept saying I got to be there. Then as I was moving the RA I could tell, yes I am here. I don't know how long I looked, but it was a while.

#4 Tony Flanders

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:57 AM

M33 was easily found with the 24 mm. I could see some loose structure scattered here and there in patches...

I explored around the edges, and to my right, there was a star and some fuzzy stuff below it.


Congratulations; you have "discovered" NGC 604, one of the brightest emission nebulae known anywhere in the universe.

#5 kenrenard

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 08:52 AM

I tried for M33 first time on Saturday night. Some clouds rolling in with my 8 inch dob and had no luck. I did some reading about its low surface brightness and decided to try with binoculars on Tuesday. I got it a bit dim but I saw it. Now that I know what to look for I can spend more time studying it.

As a beginner I was happy to find it. I just need more time and clear skies. I found out I'm in a red zone which doesn't help. My observation was made in a yellow zone which to me seems like very very dark skies.


Ed D I do like your sketch.

#6 northernontario

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 08:37 AM

M33 was easily found with the 24 mm. I could see some loose structure scattered here and there in patches...

I explored around the edges, and to my right, there was a star and some fuzzy stuff below it.


Congratulations; you have "discovered" NGC 604, one of the brightest emission nebulae known anywhere in the universe.


Thank you for identifying this one Tony.

It is amazing to see an object with in an object.

The following evening I spent a great deal of time on the Andromeda Galaxy. I heard there are globulars that can be seen with in the galaxy.

I did not spot them. But I wasn't sure where to look.

jake

#7 Tony Flanders

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 09:06 AM

The following evening I spent a great deal of time on the Andromeda Galaxy. I heard there are globulars that can be seen with in the galaxy.

I did not spot them. But I wasn't sure where to look.


You have essentially no chance of spotting them without a detailed chart. G1, the brightest and biggest, does indeed look quite obviously non-stellar at 200X in a big scope. However, it's fully 2.5 degrees from M31's core, and nowhere near the visible disk.

The most obvious target within M31 for big scope under dark skies is the magnificent star cloud NGC 206. Look for it right about where the two main dust lanes intersect the main axis of the galaxy.

#8 Bill Weir

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 03:09 PM

So you want to find G 1, like Tony said you need a good chart. Here is a good source for all objects within M31.
http://ned.ipac.calt...las/frames.html

G 1 is well outside the standardly observed galaxy. Here is a widefield finder chart. Take note of where M32 is and the bright star 32 Andromedae and that asterism around it. These for me are the key starting points for the star hop to G 1. Five degree width to this FOV.
http://www.nightskyi...ster/g1_map.gif

And here is the more closeup finder chart for once you are in the area. One degree width to the FOV. Stars to 14th mag
http://www.nightskyi...etailed_map.gif

This is an object that requires higher magnification. I've seen it for sure with my 6" scope at 240X as a small disc with two points of stars on it's edge. Mickey Mouse is the term many use to describe it. Here is a good shot of how it should look.
http://www.astrosurf.com/jwisn/g1.htm

Good luck. With your 16" it should be a snap.

Bill






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