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Arthur C. Clarke

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#1 Rick Woods

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 06:50 PM

I was looking through my fiction library, and was surprised and pleased to see I had copies of the two books I consider Clarke's masterpieces, "The City and The Stars" and "Childhood's End". It's been a long time since I read them, so, since I'm laid up with a cold, I read them both again.
I see why I was so enamored of Clarke's writing when I was a kid; nobody else ever had the grand vision the he had. He dealt with the vast epics spanning billions of years with such feeling, emotion, and intelligence!

No wonder he's in the Pantheon of Greats! He and Bradbury - that's about it for the top tier, in my book. (I never felt Asimov was even close to either of them.)
Clarke, Bradbury, Armstrong, Moore - all the heroes from my youth are passing on! :(

#2 okieav8r

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 09:14 PM

I'd like to read those two myself Rick. Also, I would love to get a copy of 'Rendevous With Rama'. I've heard it's also a really good book.

#3 Rick Woods

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 11:29 PM

I read that one a long time ago; but I don't remember much about it.

#4 rmollise

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 11:56 PM

If you haven't done so, read _Against the Fall of Night_, which Clarke expanded into The City and the Stars. I like it better.

#5 Spaced

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 02:03 AM

"Against the Fall of Night" was, so far as I remember, the first sci fi I read, probably when I was in 5th grade. Masterful vision.

#6 Rick Woods

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 12:26 PM

If you haven't done so, read _Against the Fall of Night_, which Clarke expanded into The City and the Stars. I like it better.


I will, thanks!

#7 Tony Flanders

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 02:28 PM

No wonder he's in the Pantheon of Greats! He and Bradbury - that's about it for the top tier, in my book.


It's really a different genre, but Stanislaw Lem is my favorite science-fiction writer.

#8 Rick Woods

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Posted 11 January 2013 - 03:57 PM

He's new to me - I'll look him up.

After reading the two Clarke greats mentioned above, I poked around to see what else I had by him. I found "Islands In the Sky", which I'd never read before. Quite an anticlimax, I'm afraid. It's basically "Bobby Blastoff - Junior Space Cadet and his Adventure in Space". Just the thing for a 12-year-old back in the 50's. *sigh* Another one for the donate pile.

#9 rmollise

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 10:08 AM

No wonder he's in the Pantheon of Greats! He and Bradbury - that's about it for the top tier, in my book.


It's really a different genre, but Stanislaw Lem is my favorite science-fiction writer.


I love Solaris (the novel), and like the screenplays for some of the films he worked on (First Spaceship on Venus), but for me the big three still RULE:

Clarke
Heinlein
Asimov

Followed by

Niven
Pournelle
Varley

:cool:

#10 Rick Woods

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 11:35 AM

Heinlein did the Billy Blastoff type stuff a lot better than Clarke did. (In addition to all his more serious stuff, of course!)

I was one of the generation massively influenced by "Stranger in a Strange Land". Living in California in the 60's certainly helped there! But, I was really shocked when I learned what Heinlein's motive was in writing it.

#11 StarStuff1

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 04:46 PM

After 40+ years I re-read "Stranger..." a couple of years ago and enjoyed it very much again. Guess I'm not into this enough to know but:

What was the motive?

#12 Rick Woods

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 06:12 PM

OK, this is third hand; I was told this a long time ago, by someone who supposedly met Heinlein at a party and asked him about it. So this is hearsay.

But, his motive was supposedly to see if he could make the idea of group sex and ritual cannibalism palatable to the reading public of the day.

Can you grok that?!? :p

#13 StarStuff1

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Posted 12 January 2013 - 10:11 PM

GROK!!!

#14 droid

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 10:19 PM

No one here has the Rama series, Ive got all of em. Of course it was co authored, so not entirely Clarkes

#15 PhilCo126

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 05:46 AM

Please check the British Interplanetary Society:
http://www.bis-space...arthur-c-clarke

#16 rmollise

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 07:55 AM

No one here has the Rama series, Ive got all of em. Of course it was co authored, so not entirely Clarkes


Well...Rendezvous with Rama was all Clarke. The others? I've read 'em. Disappointing. I liked the way the original left some mystery to Rama.

#17 droid

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 09:57 AM

Im kinda weird I guess, I read one book , and if theres more in the series, Ive gotta get em too.
For instance the Foundation series, read one, next thing you know I own em all, same thing with the Rama books, read the first and had to have em all.
Goofy I know. lol

#18 Rick Woods

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 11:59 AM

No one here has the Rama series, Ive got all of em. Of course it was co authored, so not entirely Clarkes


Well...Rendezvous with Rama was all Clarke. The others? I've read 'em. Disappointing. I liked the way the original left some mystery to Rama.


Yeah, that was Clarke's way. He didn't feel the need to explain things or have everything neatly wrapped up at the end of a story. He gave us credit for enough intelligence to supply our own explanations.
I read the first one before there were any sequals; I'm glad I never looked at the others.






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