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It's too cold out for observing when...

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#1 orion61

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 07:58 PM

You try to observe and your eyes water so much you instantly freeze to the eyepiece, too cold.. tonight,
sorry Jupiter. :coldday:

#2 MikeBOKC

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:17 PM

I just checked the Jupiter weather. Temp at the top of the cloud belts is minus 145 celsius. Count your blessings in Iowa! It's a virtual heat wave!!

#3 yonkrz

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:34 PM

just came in,jupiter was pretty nice.But it was chilly.

#4 rmollise

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:41 PM

You breathe out and you can see your breath. :lol:

#5 Don Taylor

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 08:47 PM

Yup - I was out last night working on a new (to me) scope. Only 50 degrees colder outside than inside. Hmmmmm could those be tube currents? Too cold for me. I lasted only about an hour and half. Couldn't figure out the nebulosity I saw everywhere until I realized my breath was frosting the eyepiece. I'm ready for summer.

#6 Brian Risley

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:06 PM

Wimps! :) I was out till 2am Sat imaging Jupiter and some double stars. Helps that we were the warmest spot in the nation!
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#7 GeneT

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:23 PM

When it is colder than 40 degrees F. :grin:

#8 herrointment

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 09:35 PM

Below 10 F I don't have any fun but the code of conduct for the stoic scandahoovian says you must suffer. You may be offered coffee when you come in!

#9 Bill Barlow

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 10:07 PM

I just came in from observing Jupiter with Europa's shadow crossing the planet, just below the great red spot. Pretty nice view! I also looked at the Trapezium and could see the E and F stars with my excellent optically Meade 8" LX200R scope. Was using 9mm and 7mm Naglers, giving 222x and 285x. It was 16 degrees out, but no wind, with some high thin cirrus clouds. I set the scope out around 4 PM to cool down.

I have been out a few times when the temperature was under 10 degrees, but when doing this, have to have an object that is somewhat unusual to view, like the shadow transit on Jupiter like tonight or as in the past, a comet.

Bill

#10 DavidNealMinnick

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Posted 14 January 2013 - 10:45 PM

...you notice the gallon plastic jug of water sitting on your truck's tailgate is a solid block of ice.

#11 albert1

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 02:32 AM

Two sets of long johns, thermal socks, head/face mask and I'm still uncomfortable at 30 above after an hour.
All I keep thinking about are the summer nights in shorts and sandals behind the binoviewers. :tonofbricks:

#12 aa6ww

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 04:59 AM

You try to observe and your eyes water so much you instantly freeze to the eyepiece, too cold.. tonight,
sorry Jupiter. :coldday:


Jupiter was exceptional here. I had my C14 out all weekend here in calif. I agree its way too cold, but I run two propane heaters on me, away from my scope and it gets the job done, 42000 BTU's each. Id never manage to observe with out them this time of the year.

...Ralph

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#13 RobertED

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 06:28 AM

Sorry guys!....I just don't do cold as well as I used to!!! :shrug: :snowedin: :stuck: What time does "Big Bang Theory" come on???....lol.... :coldday: :coldday: :coldday: :imawake:

#14 SteveTheSwede

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 06:37 AM

I'm ok to about -15C then the discomfort start to overshadow the enjoyment. Also humidity matters as much as temperature, much harder to stay warm in a cold and humid climate than cold and dry. Not to mention the fact that dry air is good for the seeing so you have more reason to be out in the first place. Lucky me living in a northern coastal city where cold and humid is a way of life.
On the other hand, I was out observing in -10C just the other night and I had a great time with M43 and Jupiter so temperature is nothing to obsess about :)


#15 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 07:53 AM

Two sets of long johns, thermal socks, head/face mask and I'm still uncomfortable at 30 above after an hour.
All I keep thinking about are the summer nights in shorts and sandals behind the binoviewers. :tonofbricks:


Any mosquitoes around your parts? :)

It actually gets somewhat cold in the San Diego mountains. Last night right now accuweather says it 22F with a 10mph wind at our place out there. It's generally windier and warmer.

I'll observe at 20F but I know some of you are out there when its below zero. I wear heavy shoes/boots with thermal socks, sweat pants, jeans topped off with snowboarding pants to keep out the wind. Up top I wear thermal under shirt, a sweater, a heavy flannel shirt and a down jacket. If it's really windy, I have a LL Bean Coat/Jacket that goes on top. On top I wear a fur hat and wear gloves though I am always taking them off.. I stay out a couple of hours before I have to go inside to warm up.

What keeps me going: Thinking of you that are there when it's really cold.

Jon

#16 Sunspot

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 09:25 AM

It's almost too cold when I come back into the house and put on the glasses I was wearing outside and they fog up.

#17 t.r.

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 09:46 AM

...I can't open the front door due to the snow piling up! It has happened...the scene below is typical for three months straight here (DEC,JAN & FEB).

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#18 Starman27

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 10:45 AM

When all of the cables are frozen in position.

#19 Peter Natscher

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 11:14 AM

I'm using a Cabela's Ice Fishing jacket, and pants if necessary, fur-lined cap, and warm Uggs and I'm very comfortable siting at the eyepiece in 32°F temps. RH become more important as you don't want dew freezing to frost over everything. Cabela's makes great freezing weather observing clothes! Out here in coastal California two nights ago, I was enjoying Jupiter and various DSO's and didn't realize the temp. was down to 35°F by 9pm. It dropped down to 28°F a few hours later on. Unusual -- winter time at night is usually in the low 50's.

You try to observe and your eyes water so much you instantly freeze to the eyepiece, too cold.. tonight,
sorry Jupiter. :coldday:



#20 Douglas729

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 11:25 AM

by midnight my Ultima 11 began to look like it belonged on the deck of a whaling ship in the Bering Sea launching harpoons!

#21 John Miele

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 11:46 AM

You try to observe and your eyes water so much you instantly freeze to the eyepiece, too cold.. tonight,
sorry Jupiter. :coldday:


Jupiter was exceptional here. I had my C14 out all weekend here in calif. I agree its way too cold, but I run two propane heaters on me, away from my scope and it gets the job done, 42000 BTU's each. Id never manage to observe with out them this time of the year.

...Ralph


Ralph,

I really like your light blocker panels. Do you set them up each time you observe or do you leav eyhem up for longer periods of time?...John

#22 bierbelly

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 11:50 AM

WSP...WSP...WSP :jump:

#23 Patrick

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 12:25 PM

WSP...WSP...WSP



I'm going this year! Yeah! I'm tired of this cold weather and we're only half way through. Worse than the cold though is the constant cloudiness...

Patrick

#24 JoeR

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 12:34 PM

When your hand warmers cease to warm your hands anymore.

#25 jrbarnett

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 01:05 PM

I use the "citrus test". If it's cold enough that I need to cover my citrus trees with plastic, it's too cold for anything but a brief session. Moving around, I can be comfy in shorts and fleece jackets down to about 30F. Sitting still, though, is a different beast. I bundle up for long sessions and my cut-off is about 34F for an all-nighter.

- Jim






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