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It's too cold out for observing when...

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#51 Paul Schroeder

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 01:15 PM

For me, it's too cold to observe when you can do this.

#52 starrysolace

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 06:49 PM

I spent 4 hours out last night in freezing weather. i'm considering one of these musuc bags.

http://www.sleepingb...lts-yellow.html

#53 wky46

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 06:57 PM

It's too cold when the wind is blowing 20 mph, single digit temps and with a waxing gibbous moon..... like tonight. However, I do have the telescope set up out there and waiting, just in case the wind abates.... Phil

#54 gerfmon

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 11:25 PM

My eyelid tries to stick to the top of my favorite volcano top ortho.

Happened to me a couple of weeks ago, it was -5F. I lasted 45 minutes. I managed to frost over two eyepieces with my breath. I won't be observing in those kinds of temps again. :)

#55 Sarkikos

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 08:51 AM

It's too cold out for observing when...

your 150mm Mak never cools down. Hey, that's not so very cold! :thinking:

:grin:
Mike

#56 Sarkikos

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 08:58 AM

Bob,

. . . your eyepiece is stuck to your fingers . . . and you can't get it off without removing some skin ! ! !

Gloves just don't cut-it,
Bob


I know what you mean. I've never had a pair of gloves that actually keep your hands warm enough and give you enough tactile sensation and grip to do the work required in amateur astronomy.

Usually I just do without gloves. If I wear gloves at the telescope, I end up tearing them off in disgust within five minutes anyway.

Mike

#57 Sarkikos

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:05 AM

I would rather have mosquitoes and dew than cold and frost. I find it's easier to deal with the mosquitoes and dew.

If it's colder than the '20's, I usually don't go out to observe. I've been at my dark site for as long as six hours in 20 degree temps. But about every hour-and-a-half I take a break in the warm car for 20 minutes or so.

Mike

#58 mich_al

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:11 AM

All those construction and outdoor workers must wear Carharts and Dickies for a reason.

I can only speak about Carharts. They are high quality, very much wind resistant and warm. Carharts are available in Brown and Black. The black are much warmer. Don't wear the black if you're involved in any activity cause they will be too warm.

#59 Sarkikos

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:17 AM

The only parts of my body that really get cold and stay cold are my hands and feet ... especially the hands. It's easy to keep the trunk, legs, arms and head warm.

Mike

#60 Sarkikos

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 09:25 AM

BigC,

Instead of two sets of long johns, try thermal underwear(top and bottom) and jogging pants and top;the two layers of longjohns act as one layer but the looser jogging clothes will trap warmed air .Over those you want something that will stop the wind.Currently I make do with denim pants and a flannel shirt and one of several sweaters covered by a unlined or insulated hooded hoodie,or an industrial rated insulated coat.Knit cap too.


Yes, doubling up the thermal underwear and wearing sweat pants and top do the trick for me. Then I wear a double-layered coat and over that a DarkApparel vest. I put a tube warmer - I don't know what they're called - around my neck, and a thermal cap over my head and ears. If it's really cold, I'll wear a face mask.

The only parts that still get cold are my hands and feet. Two layers of socks, chemical heat packs on the toes, and high loose boots make my feet bearable, but not as warm as the rest of my body. But the hands are a lost cause. I need them exposed in order to work at the telescope.

Mike

#61 greedyshark

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 04:39 PM

You try to observe and your eyes water so much you instantly freeze to the eyepiece, too cold.


Yep...my eyelashes have frozen to the glass on more than one occasion :coldday:

Charles

#62 spencerj

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 12:40 PM

I like the ranges being posted. Count me among the guys from the north.

I love the crisp clean feeling of a cold dark night. If it is so cold your equipment (and/or hands) have trouble working, it is probably too cold to be out observing--for too long anyway. But as long as cables aren't breaking and the mount still works, I would much rather deal with 0* weather than mosquitos.

#63 JohnH

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 01:06 PM

I did do a small observing session (20 minutes @ -3C and high relative humidity) and used my 80mm refractor. Jupiter and the just past first quarter Moon were close together, having past by each other on a different hemisphere than mine.

Too cold for observing?

One word: Snotcicles

#64 Sarkikos

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 01:19 PM

Does anyone else share my preference for mosquitoes rather than temps below freezing?

We have ways to deal with 'skeeters now. I can go the whole night with nary a bite. But there's no way to keep MY hands warm and still be able to manipulate the astro equipment. Not happenin'.

:snowedin: :coldday: :noway:

Mike

#65 coutleef

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 03:38 PM

Bob,

. . . your eyepiece is stuck to your fingers . . . and you can't get it off without removing some skin ! ! !

Gloves just don't cut-it,
Bob


I know what you mean. I've never had a pair of gloves that actually keep your hands warm enough and give you enough tactile sensation and grip to do the work required in amateur astronomy.

Usually I just do without gloves. If I wear gloves at the telescope, I end up tearing them off in disgust within five minutes anyway.

Mike


i often observe at temperatures below -20 and solve the problem by wearing a pair of thin gloves used for cross country skiing under my real pair of gloves and take off these and keep the thin gloves when manipulating stuff

#66 Sarkikos

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 09:16 PM

Francois,

I've tried double-gloving like that, also. But then the thin gloves snag too easily on the equipment and my hands become ice cold even faster. Nothing really works.

I think the problem is my hands, not the gloves or anything else. They get cold fast and stay cold. They hurt worse than any toothache. I broke my arm once. I swear my hands hurt more than that when they get cold. Not too fun. I'm pretty sure this is Raynaud's syndrome. I described it to my doctor last fall, and he even said that's what it is! But unfortunately, I didn't press it and he didn't offer any treatment. Next check up, I think I'll ask about treatment options.

Special gloves and gizmos just don't cut it.

Mosquitoes? Pfft! Big deal! Suck it up.

:grin:
Mike

#67 Danno2006

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 11:30 AM

It is too cold when the car thermometer reads this temp for Tuesday this week.

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#68 bogg

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 10:02 AM

Its too cold when your breath freezes on your eyebrows forming icicles and they are very hard to view through

#69 Don Taylor

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 10:21 AM

Last time I was out trying to observe it was so cold the star light froze before it could enter the telescope! :shocked:

#70 MikeML

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 11:28 AM

When the temperature is less than my age.

#71 Qwickdraw

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 04:58 PM

I work in a -50 deg f cold chamber. Its to cold to observe below that temperature.

#72 kbastro

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 06:20 PM

cold???
I do imaging soooo,,,
when its cold I just have 3 words,,, no, not "stay in side"

Low thermal noise!!!!

dslr works great
ccd requires very little cooling power

#73 MawkHawk

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 03:17 PM

When your slo-mo cable freezes and snaps off in your hand. Happened to me once...

#74 orion61

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 11:24 PM

You a drop an eyepiece in the Snow, then say a bad word!
Then you have to bring the bad word inside and thaw it out to hear it!!!

#75 Brian Risley

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 12:22 AM

:funny:






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