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Eyepiece Manufacturers

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#1 ahopp

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 08:53 AM

Question, since researching eyepieces is a major undertaking can I just pick one manufacturer and buy all my eyepieces from them. Will their product be close enough to others in quality and specs. that I can't go wrong?

Or, should I cherry pick?

Tony

#2 johnnyha

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 09:21 AM

Depends on your scope and what kind of viewing you like to do.

#3 csrlice12

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 09:26 AM

Yes, as long as everything you buy says "Televue" on it...hope you're filthy rich though......

You'll find that most people here have eyepieces from various manufactuers. Not all eyepieces in a given line are created equal. That being said, Televue, Explore Scientific, Baader, Brandons (Drink!), Pentax, Vixen, Zeiss, GSO, and numerous others all make some quality eyepieces. My first recommendation would be to buy a cheap Zoom like the Zhummel 8-24 zoom (about $50). Use this to find what focal lengths are best for you, then buy these size(s) with wider fields. Fast Scopes (below f6 (f5,4) will require more expenisve/premium eyepieces then those a slower scope.

#4 dpwoos

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 10:03 AM

Question, since researching eyepieces is a major undertaking can I just pick one manufacturer and buy all my eyepieces from them. Will their product be close enough to others in quality and specs. that I can't go wrong?

Or, should I cherry pick?

Tony


Should I buy all Fords, or should I add a Chevy truck? It really is like this. To some folks it matters a great deal, to others not at all. Many of the folks who hang out here care a great deal (obsessed?) about eyepieces. I think that most folks don't care nearly as much, and so would be perfectly happy to stick with any of the reputable manufacturers if that made their decisions easier. I think that choosing eyepieces is the least of a beginner's challenges, as they are all good. If you observe with your local astro club you will see what I mean - great views can be obtained by modest eyepieces, as other factors are MUCH more important.

#5 Steve Daniel

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 10:53 AM

For what it's worth, I picked the Meade HD-60 set of 6 eyepieces, partially based on price and partially based on eye relief. Eye relief is a factor to consider if you're an astigmatic eyeglasses wearer. Enough eye relief (say between 14 and 24mm) means you can wear your glasses while viewing, if you want to do that.

#6 bremms

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 03:19 PM

In a long F ratio telescope even Huygens and Ramsden can work well... Egads! I do like my TV plossls and 15mm WF. I have a couple of 2" eyepieces. Meade 40mm EWF smoothie and a 27-28mm FL Nagleresque military(recent) eyepiece. That one is
very good out to about 65 degrees. At $25.00 it's a bargain basement ES82. It is a grenade, but I can be lightened

#7 ibase

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 10:28 PM

It may or may not be the best approach to choosing eyepieces, but cherry picking and trying out EP's from different manufacturers is a lot fun! :)

Best,

#8 bremms

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Posted 15 January 2013 - 11:20 PM

definitely try things out. I have a couple of microscope EPs that perform well. One is a 20mm Zeiss that is really fantastic. I have a soft spot for classic Orthos and have a decent collection of VTs

#9 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 02:22 PM

It may or may not be the best approach to choosing eyepieces, but cherry picking and trying out EP's from different manufacturers is a lot fun! :)

Best, Hernando


:waytogo:

Not only is it fun, but more importantly, it is instructive, there is a lot to learn just looking through different eyepieces. I know what I like, what works for me with the telescopes I own, the way I like to observe, but it wasn't always that way, I had to figure it out for myself.

For Tony, a couple of questions:

What telescope(s) do you have? What is your budget?

Jon

#10 faackanders2

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 01:16 AM

More important than manufacturer is cost, focal length (power fro your scope), and AFOV (TFOV for your scope). The latter two are usually what cloudy nights members do blind tests on.

#11 ahopp

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 09:34 AM

I have the Meade 14" ACF, Meade 90mm ETX, and looking for an APO in the 80mm-100mm range.

Not that it matters, but, I am very much into binoculars as well.

I have been an amateur astronomer for 20 years, but, have mostly done video(new to this), dslr and ccd work. Just now thinking about more eye pieces, spending more time behind the telescope and not in my warm room. I have 2 Meade units: 5000 series 26mm and a basic 20mm, no manufacture mark.

Thanks for all the comments so far...

Tony

#12 Arizona-Ken

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 10:59 AM

Eyepieces are a journey.

Don't worry about a particular line of eyepieces, but experiment to understand what you want out of them.

There are so many considerations in choosing eyepieces that you have to decide what are the characteristics that are important to you.

What kind of observing do you do? What is your equipment? What is your budget?

Are narrow FOVs OK with you or do you need wide field? If so, how wide? I'm happy with wide fields of about 68° - 72°, but others need wider. It is a personal thing. If you don't know, you have to find out for yourself.

What eye relief do you need? Some people are OK with a smaller eye relief, some need larger. The right answer is what works for you. If you don't know, you need to try things out.

Are you a planetary/lunar viewer or deep sky guy? Many people think planetary work is best done with simple glass eyepieces, while DSO work can more easily use the multiple lens eyepieces to get a wider field of view. Others, including me, find very little or no difference between a simple lens eyepiece and a high quality multi-lens eyepiece, especially on axis.

How big is your wallet? Expensive, especially from quality manufacturers, gives a better view. Several years ago, as I went through my journey I found the Baader line an excellent modest-priced value. Today, ES eyepieces are the rage. Other lines exist and offer good views for the money. However, I finally got into high end Naglers, Panoptics and Pentax XWs, but by then I knew what eyepiece characteristics I wanted.

Try out various eyepieces. If you have friends, or a local astronomy club, let them help you with the journey. You will probably think you know what you want, but experience will change your requirements. You may end up with several groups of eyepieces as you experiment, but then you will really know and understand what works for you.

Arizona Ken

#13 dpwoos

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 12:48 PM

Or maybe not go on that journey at all, and instead just get a set of Meade or Celestron or TV or GSO or whatevers and not worry about it any more. Everyone will come at it from their own angle, and for some folks acquiring all of their eyepieces from one manufacturer/line is what works for them, and which is what the original post asked. One can do outrageously good observing using all modestly priced plossls and a barlow from one of many manufacturers. BTW, not what I did/do, but there is no good reason why I didn't/couldn't except my personality and interests.

#14 csrlice12

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 02:51 PM

Classic Example why "buying the whole line" DOESN'T work: Orion Expanse and its clones. The 6 & 9mm are both pretty decent, even in faster scopes, but the 15 and 20mm will make you wake up in the middle of the night screaming from the nightmares they give you in a fast scope.......

#15 MitchAlsup

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 03:56 PM

Question, since researching eyepieces is a major undertaking can I just pick one manufacturer and buy all my eyepieces from them.

Or, should I cherry pick?


If you stick to TV and ES you can hardly go wrong, especially as you leand towards the 100dFoV and wider EPs.

#16 GeneT

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 04:19 PM

Question, since researching eyepieces is a major undertaking can I just pick one manufacturer and buy all my eyepieces from them. Will their product be close enough to others in quality and specs. that I can't go wrong? Or, should I cherry pick? Tony


You can go with one manufacturer. I ended up doing that with TeleVue--Naglers and Delos eyepieces. The characteristics remain constant even in different focal lengths. You could save some money and go with Explorer Scientific, or other brands. I recommend getting a decent high, medium, and low power eyepiece to start with. You can then throw in a Barlow or Powermate to double those three eyepieces into six. How old are you? Your eyepiece quest probably will take you into old age--and beyond. :grin:

#17 dpwoos

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 08:49 AM

Classic Example why "buying the whole line" DOESN'T work: Orion Expanse and its clones. The 6 & 9mm are both pretty decent, even in faster scopes, but the 15 and 20mm will make you wake up in the middle of the night screaming from the nightmares they give you in a fast scope.......


You think that, and who knows I might agree with you (I have no idea). However, I believe that there are so many opinions like this floating around here that beginners are very likely to come away not with good info, but rather so much info (pro and con this and that) that they are no better off than simply choosing a manufactuer/line and going for it. To be honest, I have NEVER found that I had great views from a mediocre scope using great eyepeices, nor mediocre views from a great scope using modest eyepieces. I think a beginner who doesn't want to obsess over eyepeices will do just fine picking some manufacture/line, and get out observing including observing with others. Then, they will educate themselves as to what they have, and what they need, and what they want.

The best observers I know worry very little about their eyepieces, and rather spend their time observing and learning about what they are observing.

#18 droid

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 09:31 AM

Question, since researching eyepieces is a major undertaking can I just pick one manufacturer and buy all my eyepieces from them. Will their product be close enough to others in quality and specs. that I can't go wrong?

Or, should I cherry pick?

Tony


Short answer, yes you could.
When I bought my first real telescope, an 8 inch f/6 reflector, I bought the entire Sirius plossl set. This was back in the early 90s.
Since Ive replaced some of them, a Celestron silver top 25mm replaced the sirius plossl, a UO 12mm replaced its sirius counter part, and so on.
You do not need to start with the most expensive eps, in fact Id never recommend a beginner do that.
Most eye piece lines for sale now a days are probably good to decent, regardless.
And yes there will be better out there, but until you look through them, youll never miss them.
But once you look through one. :ohmy: :roflmao:

#19 Dave Ittner

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 01:40 PM

The best observers I know worry very little about their eyepieces, and rather spend their time observing and learning about what they are observing.


+1

Get out and observe. Hang out and make new friends. Try their eyepieces.

#20 Aquarist

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 01:57 PM

Well, it really depends:

+on what you wish to observe
+what telescope they will be used on
+what eye relief you need
+what exit pupil you need
+what you want to spend

The manufacturers I personally like are: Pentax, Televue, Explore Scientific, and Takahashi but for any individual your mileage will definitely vary.

#21 Mike W

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 07:59 PM

Yea, like ES 100mm, $300-$600, thats not expensive? :band:






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