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Caught the Pup for the First Time

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#26 nirvanix

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 07:03 PM

I feel the pup really needs 9+ seeing for mama to lift her skirts and show it to us. Anyone that has caught it even once has accomplished something.

#27 jrbarnett

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 11:23 PM

I think the Pup is pretty easy with a 3" to 5" aperture at just 70-100x. I don't think high magnification is needed if you have an extremely high contrast, well-baffled scope. I plan on trying tonight with a 60mm.

Regards,

Jim

#28 Rutilus

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 03:12 AM

Using my Carton 100mm f/13, I've caught the Pup on quite a few occassions since the start of this year.
I find that magnification around 100x work best with my scope.

#29 Sarkikos

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 11:40 AM

Jim,

I think the Pup is pretty easy with a 3" to 5" aperture at just 70-100x. I don't think high magnification is needed if you have an extremely high contrast, well-baffled scope. I plan on trying tonight with a 60mm.


I think the experience of the observer may have something to do with the difficulty of splitting Sirius or other double stars. I very seldom observe double stars. At home, I like to concentrate on the Moon and planets. At my dark site, I mostly observe galaxies, nebulae and difficult open clusters.

So for me, double stars are an afterthought. I very seldom bother with them. Even attempting the Pup on that night was a fluke. And the idea of trying to split a double with the lowest magnification or smallest aperture is something that is alien to my mind. I just don't do it. I was actually trying for the easiest and most pleasing view of the Pup! If I were to become more involved with doubles, I'd probably mostly view color contrast pairs and interesting multiple systems, at least at first.

Now, trying to see the faintest galaxies or nebulae with my telescope, that's something different. I can understand that.

:grin:
Mike

#30 nirvanix

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 03:12 PM

At my latitude Sirius is always low which makes it a tough split at the best of times. Also the angular separation varies quite a bit (from 3 to 11 arcsec according to Wikipedia), so the challenge changes along with it. At 3 arcsec it requires an aperature of 12". Currently I think it's near its maximum separation which allows much smaller instruments to participate in the hunt. :jump:

#31 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 04:26 PM

One of the highlights of my trip to a very dark site on Saturday night was seeing Sirius B (the Pup), through a 22" SDM Dob (10mm Delos) and a 25" Obsession Dob (8 and 13mm Ethos).

Sirius B reaches a maximum separation of 11.5 arc seconds in 2025.

http://astroguyz.com...u-spy-sirius-b/

http://www.sydneyobs...panion-of-si...

Dave Mitsky

#32 WRAK

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 02:46 AM

...So for me, double stars are an afterthought. ...Now, trying to see the faintest galaxies or nebulae with my telescope, that's something different...


Mike - with the C6 you mentioned visual observation could get quickly rather boring if you restrict yourself to "faintest galaxies or nebulae" while with doubles you have thousands of interesting targets available. So maybe thinking twice could be productive.
Wilfried

#33 Sarkikos

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 06:52 AM

I always think twice ... at least. But did you forget about the Moon and planets? The Moon itself has thousands of interesting targets available. :ubetcha:

Don't worry. I'll get around to all those pretty and interesting doubles. They aren't going anywhere.

:grin:
Mike

#34 CollinofAlabama

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 11:11 PM

Mike,

Congratulations on the split! Sirius is one tough nut to crack, and am encouraged by your success. Jim's awful lucky to have those Californie skies, but I'm counting on his luck with smaller aperture instruments. Now if my windy, turbulent skies will calm down for a few minutes.

One night a wild young cowboy came in
Wild as the West Texas wind.

:banjodance:

#35 azure1961p

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:07 AM

Congrats Mike. The few times I tried this winter I got nothing but a beautifully flickering Sirius, bloated and colorful. I still hold out hope . I'm glad you got it.

Pete

#36 Sarkikos

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:58 AM

I'm glad that the two other observers with me that night tried for the Pup first. Otherwise I probably wouldn't have even given it a thought. I guess sometimes we do get a night of good seeing in winter here in Maryland, but not very often. Mostly it's twinkle, twinkle little star until summer and fall.

Mike

#37 cildastun

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 04:13 AM

I've managed to catch the Pup four times this year with a 5" Mak; not easy here as Oxford, UK is 52 degrees lat, and Sirius is often a boiling ball! We've also had one of the least astronomy-friendly years on record.

The colour to me always seems slightly slate-blue, although that may be an artefact of the Mak which always shows faint stars slightly bluer than they really are, according to stella classification.

Chris

#38 HCR32

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Posted 27 March 2013 - 06:16 AM

I had a go not long ago and from my location it almost over head. I thought I saw it but couldn't be sure because I was testing color performance of my scope. I was at around 280-300x with a160 f7. Who knows I should have paid more attention so I'm booking myself in again to see if I could see it. The only reason I question myself is I thought the magnification needed to be higher to see it?

#39 Perigny270

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 07:35 PM

Good thread here. I was pretty sure I had seen the pup a couple of nights ago, but now i am wondering. Seeing was excellent and I was using my 6.7mm and 4.7mm ES eyepieces. Jupiter was dancing with its moons. Rigel split clearly and cleanly. Barely made out trapezium e, but not f. Sirius was its usual bright blue and burbling somewhat at the 300-400X. It had a bulge to the SE that was farther out with the 4.7 than the 6.7. With the 4.7 and a UHC filter the second, smaller object was reddish. However, appeared to be a lot more than 1/10000 of the big blue spotlight, so I my have just been seeing an artifact of my optics. BTW, Rigel's companion was definitely miniscule and standing out separately, hence my new skepticism. This summer I am going after Antares with a green filter to cut down the glare. Any hints for the pup? Maybe my ED102 on its new mount (CT Duo-T) would be better...

#40 Bonco

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 09:10 PM

I recently posted a view here with my 75mm telescope. I removed my post when I couldn't duplicate it the next night with my 4 inch in similar conditions. The only view I've had so far that I have 100% confidence in is one with my 10 inch. In that view it was a tiny blue dot that was persistent. I'm sure as time goes by my small refractors will show it.
Bill

#41 Sarkikos

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 09:13 PM

The only view I've had so far that I have 100% confidence in is one with my 10 inch. In that view it was tiny blue dot that was persistent. I'm sure as time goes by my small refractors will show it.
Bill


Yes, that's how Sirius B appeared in my 10" Dob. I've never tried for it with a smaller aperture.

Mike

#42 rookie

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Posted 16 April 2013 - 09:55 PM

Last night we were awarded with clear and steady skies. Seeing was 8 using the Pickering scale. I was able to observe Sirius A and B easily after sunset, in early twilight before full darkness. I used my TV85 refractor with a Nagler 3-5mm zoom ep. The split's best view had a sweet spot power range of 120-150x. The pup was steady, clear, and visible for 30-40 minutes. Full darkness increased the glare of A and made the view no longer possible.

#43 Bonco

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 02:59 PM

Excellent report. I've been attempting a view with my small refractors but not yet sucessful. I too live in the Tampa area and computer problems I was working on prevented me from giving it a try last night. Thanks for the report its got me motivated to keep going for it.
Bill

#44 rookie

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 09:52 PM

I'm glad that you are encouraged Bill! Hope that you have success soon.

#45 CelestronDaddy

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Posted 17 April 2013 - 10:25 PM

Nice going! :grin:

#46 Bonco

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 08:02 PM

Finally got the pup with a small refractor. Just after sunset with a not so dark sky in the Tampa Fl area. Seeing not so great with thin high alt cirrus clouds, estimate Pickering of 6-7. Four inch f/5 refractor using 9mm plus 2.4 Dakin barlow = 133X. Moments of very steady view. Pa of 80. Small dot outside the "sphere" of the primary. I knew it was a matter of time. I think my 80mm scopes would view it but thinking my 60mm's are not yet up to the task.
Bill

#47 rookie

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Posted 18 April 2013 - 08:49 PM

Congratulations! If the high cirrus clouds are very thin, they can filter some of the glare and improve the visibility of the pup.

#48 Bonco

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Posted 19 April 2013 - 03:08 PM

Yes I think the thin cirrus clouds aided the view, that is until thicker ones moved in and blocked the view entirly. I was only able to view for about 15 minutes. Bill

#49 jrbarnett

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Posted 20 April 2013 - 10:14 PM

Yep. That has been my experience too. I can do it most of the time with an 80mm at ~70x and above, but no dice with a 60mm at any magnification. Maybe when it hits maximum separation in a few years it will be doable in a 60mm.

Regards,

Jim






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