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C/2012 S1 ISON

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#26 Tonk

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 06:17 AM

Whoa - thats some effort Hiro! Nice result

#27 hiro

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 08:03 AM

Thanks Tonk,

I planned to try dithering technique with drizzle command of IRIS, but I could not do it this time.
Here is a command list of IRIS and link to dithering technique.
http://www.astrosurf...mandsFrame.html

#28 John Wunderlin

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 06:30 PM

Here's my data from last night. I'll try to calculate the magnitude later today if I have time. This was 18x5min bin 1x1. 10" LX50 @ f/6.3, ST8300.

Attached Files



#29 John Wunderlin

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Posted 02 March 2013 - 07:32 PM

Magnitude 15.4

#30 hiro

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Posted 03 March 2013 - 07:25 AM

Hi,

C/2012 S1 ISON on February 10, 2013 again.

Posted Image

I have updated the image, scaled up x5 earlier, and it got a little more precise.

Here is the original.

http://www.flickr.co...roc/8523305073/

Thanks.

#31 canukLX90

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 03:23 AM

Very nice effort. Thanks for posting.
There was a clear night here, finally, and I managed to
image the comet. Attached is 5 X 3 minutes at ISO 800.
The object marked at mag 17.5 is a galaxy. The comet is
still over 4 AU from the earth and the sun and is moving
at around 19 arcsec / hour.

PJ

Attached Files



#32 canukLX90

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 03:27 AM

Attached is a crop resized to show a bit more detail. For
this image stack I used the comet versus the stars. The
tail seems quite broad to me with a well defined nucleus.

PJ

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#33 buddyjesus

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 03:54 PM

now those pics are going deep. gj

#34 John Wunderlin

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 06:23 PM

Looking good guys! I'm clouded out for a few days. I hope I get a chance to see Panstarrs too.

#35 AXAF

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 04:31 AM

Here is my most recent image of Comet ISON, taken on 3/14/13 at 04:30UT. It is a 20 minute exposure using a 0.50-m f/6.8 astrograph and a FLI ProLine PL11002M CCD camera.

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#36 Jure Atanackov

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 10:41 AM

I'm beginning to wonder if the early expectations of comet ISON becoming as spectacular as the Great comet of 1680 (some even compared it with the Great september comet of 1882…) were just a bit too optimistic. At this time the comet isn't looking intrinsically very bright. Right now it's about magnitude 15. Its heliocentric magnitude is ~12.0. At the same heliocentric distance (4.5 a.u.), comet PanSTARRS was 1-1.5 magnitudes brighter. Similar to comet PanSTARRS, ISON also appears dynamically new. I can’t help but wonder if ISON will follow PanSTARRS’ photometric development, but perhaps a magnitude or so fainter. Maybe H0~6.5 or so and n~3. On a more positive note, the comet appears quite dusty – its morphology is actually quite similar to comet PanSTARRS at the same heliocentric distance. It has a small, compact coma and a developing dust tail. A very dusty nature of the comet would also explain the brightness bump around opposition, when its brightness would have been increased by backscattering. At H0~6.5 the comet would still be above the Bortle survival limit and still at least 4 magnitudes brighter than comet Lovejoy. So its perihelion survival probably isn’t questionable, but I really wonder if it will become as bright and spectacular as first expected...
CS!Jure

#37 OldDeadOne

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 04:30 PM

All we can do is hope that it is spectacular when it is viewable this fall,I know I am I want a nice naked eye with a nice tail comet winking it's eye at me.

#38 Tonk

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Posted 14 March 2013 - 05:04 PM

I think you might well be right - those concerns have been expressed on Comets-ML

#39 aa6ww

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 02:15 AM

I'm looking forward to tracking comet ISON as soon as its observable in my C14. Comets are my favorite objects to track, its the one thing I like to look for every time theres a new moon and I'm out with my largest scope..

...Ralph

#40 BrooksObs

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 08:54 AM

I share Jure's concerns about the actual potential for Comet ISON to become a truly spectacular object, at least in the eyes of the average amateur astronomer and likewise the general public. I have little current doubt that it will do at least as well as did Comet Lovejoy last year. However, one must keep in mind that for nearly all its southern observers and the astrophotographers they saw it largely under very dark sky conditions, a situation unlikely to prevail for the average northern hemisphere observer.

For objects like Comet ISON, what is actually seen and the degree of spectacle presented is often highly dependent of the clarity and sky darkness enjoyed by the observers...especially once the comet is a couple of weeks, or more, past perihelion and finally well placed in the sky.

BrooksObs

#41 hiro

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Posted 31 March 2013 - 03:04 AM

Hi,

C/2012 S1 (ISON) on March 11, 2013UTC.

Posted Image

The tail looks to be a little longer compared to my last image in February 10th. above with the same small imaging train and in the same scale. North is up. Here is the original.
http://www.flickr.co...roc/8605547812/

Thanks.

#42 John Wunderlin

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Posted 01 April 2013 - 10:14 PM

March 31, Magnitude 14.4. I had to remove the nearby star in photoshop in order to measure the magnitude so this may be off slightly. 30 minutes of 3 minute subs. Also was very hard to stack on comet so it's a little blurry... oh well better luck next month.

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#43 nytecam

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Posted 02 April 2013 - 12:00 PM

Nice work John and Hiro :bow:. My brief shot below from last night Apr 1st with comet now in Auriga :grin:

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#44 canukLX90

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 12:57 PM

Hiro, John, nytecam good work on keeping track of this
fuzz ball and posting your images.

PJ

#45 jshalpha

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Posted 26 April 2013 - 03:30 PM

Just came across this thread. There are some nice images presented here. Keep up the good work.

I too have been following this comet and here are my imaging efforts (not intended for photometry) over the last few months. However, I don't think I'll get many more, since my house will be in the way soon.

http://www.pbase.com...r/c2012_s1_ison

Jim S.

#46 John Wunderlin

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 09:07 PM

Nice ones Jim,- hoping to get some more data tonight.

#47 aa6ww

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Posted 28 April 2013 - 09:57 PM

whats ISON's magnitude right now. Im going to a dark site location in a few weeks with my C14, i wonder if its in the Mag 14 range now to detect it easily?

#48 BrooksObs

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 08:24 AM

The most recent visual sighting seems to have been reported about two weeks ago, at +15.5 , while perhaps more reliable imaging techniques indicate closer to +17. Thus, ISON continues to be an excedingly difficult object even with the very largest of amateur telescopes as it continues to close with the Sun and apparently is not brightening at all.

I would point out that more "healthy" comets are often considerably brighter when reaching ISON's current solar distance. Comet Hale-Bopp was even visible with just ordinary binoculars by this time. Likewise, the ultimate brightness for ISON continues to be scaled back, with the comet now anticipated to likely be brighter than 2nd magnitude only for a few days either side of perihelion (when visible only in very bright twilight).

BrooksObs

#49 REC

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 08:41 AM

NASA just released an updated image for it and looks pretty good!

#50 BrooksObs

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Posted 29 April 2013 - 09:09 AM

Yes, REC, a pretty picture, but taken by one of the most powerful of telescopes there is. Comet PanSTARRS looked promising, too, a couple of months prior to its perihelion based on images by even much smaller instruments. We know how disappointing that one turned out to be after all the hype that surrounded it.

PanSTARRS and ISON appear to share a high degree of dust production while still quite some distance from the Sun. However, ISON seems to be intrinsically only about 1/5 the brightness of PanSTARRS. The combination is not particularly indicative of a comet with great prospects, I'm afraid.

BrooksObs






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