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RA/Dec for Zeta Oph

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#1 Danzup77

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 07:55 PM

Its of no use to me right now anyway as I dont have a clear sight of it but I'm trying to come up with a current RA/Dec for Zeta Oph. I keep finding them but literally every one is different. Thing isnt moving THAT fast is it?!!! hehe

#2 rtomw77

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:07 AM

SIMBAD J2000 coordinates for Zeta Ophiuchi:
16h 37m 09.5s -10ยบ 34' 01.5"

The wonderful astronomy reference Wikipedia ( :lol:) also gives these figures.

SIMBAD also gives the J1950 coordinates that differ slightly. Some references such as Burnham's use the ones from the 1950 epoch. Maybe this is what you are seeing. :question:

Tom

P.S.
It looks like David and I made simultaneous posts. I left off a few numbers on the far right of the decimal point in case you are wondering.

Tom

#3 David Knisely

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 05:07 AM

Its of no use to me right now anyway as I dont have a clear sight of it but I'm trying to come up with a current RA/Dec for Zeta Oph. I keep finding them but literally every one is different. Thing isnt moving THAT fast is it?!!! hehe


No, but the coordinate system is changing due to the slow precession of the Earth's axis. This changes the coordinates of all objects slowly but continuously. Generally for charting purposes, we specify what year the coordinates are valid for (the coordinate "equinox"). The standards are set about every 50 years or so (1950, 2000, 2050, etc.). Right now, most people use the eq. 2000.0 coordinate system. For that, Zeta Oph is:

R.A. 16h 37m 9.593s
Dec. -10 deg. 34' 1.53"

Clear skies to you.

#4 Danzup77

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 01:22 AM

David, my apologies on the extremely long delay in response. And thank you very much, I appreciate the reply as always.

#5 JakeSaloranta

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 06:17 AM

Tut-tut, this is the Deep Sky Observing-forum. Single stars belong to General Observing and Astronomy-forum ;)

/Jake

#6 David Knisely

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 02:07 PM

Tut-tut, this is the Deep Sky Observing-forum. Single stars belong to General Observing and Astronomy-forum ;)

/Jake


Zeta is a good take-off star for star hopping to the globular M107 or the open cluster Dolidze 27. Maybe the gentleman uses Zeta for an alignment star to improve local Go-To slew accuracy in that area of the sky and ran into the coordinate question. In any case, a simple question like this is a minor momentary deviation from the main subject matter of this forum. It can easily be answered regardless of what forum it shows up in without ruffling too many feathers. Clear skies to you.

#7 blb

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 02:19 PM

Isn't it true that anything outside of our solar system is deep sky? I too am of the opinion that deep sky objects are non stellar but I do not mind a stellar object being discussed now and then.

#8 JakeSaloranta

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 03:07 PM


Zeta is a good take-off star for star hopping to the globular M107 or the open cluster Dolidze 27. Maybe the gentleman uses Zeta for an alignment star to improve local Go-To slew accuracy in that area of the sky and ran into the coordinate question. In any case, a simple question like this is a minor momentary deviation from the main subject matter of this forum. It can easily be answered regardless of what forum it shows up in without ruffling too many feathers. Clear skies to you.


Jeez, all I was saying is that if you are gonna post a question why not do it in the right place and generally for the best outcome. There is no reason to get in to this more than this.

And Buddy, I see em as non-stellar objects, outside the solar system.

#9 Danzup77

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 06:43 PM

My apologies on not reading Jakes rule book before posting lol........And perhaps there should be a "Stellar Observing" forum if thats the case.......

Bubbye

#10 Danzup77

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 06:45 PM

Tom, thank you for your reply as well, I appreciate the info. I failed to mention you in the initial "thank you". Always appreciated though for sure!

#11 Cotts

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Posted 23 February 2013 - 09:17 PM

And Buddy, I see em as non-stellar objects, outside the solar system.


So globular and open clusters are not Deep Sky Objects?

Dave

#12 JakeSaloranta

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 02:52 AM

http://en.m.wikipedi...Deep-sky_object

#13 Danzup77

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 03:31 AM

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#14 Danzup77

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 03:34 AM

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#15 Danzup77

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Posted 24 February 2013 - 03:36 AM

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