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my curiosity is bugging me!

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#26 Mike E.

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 08:00 PM

:funny:

#27 orion61

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 03:25 PM

I tried out to a 1958 or 59 Questar in the early 90's,
It was a beautiful telescope, built to the highest standard machine wise. I loved to have it in my hands feeling the Buttery smooth action. But under the stars it was a real dog!
My B&L 4000 was better! Stars showed about 6 diffraction rings, on the Questar! Horrible S.A.
I passed on it, still have the B&L. I would expect the poor performance due to the early production. Even tho they claim a Lifetime warranty against materials and workmanship,
they wouldn't do anything about it, even tho the original owner said he would send it to avoid warranty issues.
I was so turned off by their Cavalier attitude it made me sick. Doesn't lifetime mean more than 32 years?
You can keep em' I have an ETX 90 1st series I love and would rather loose my hand than sell it...

#28 Ed Kessler

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 07:00 PM

Here is a short film on the subject


That's good! :roflmao:

#29 Mike E.

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 06:33 AM

.................You can keep em' I have an ETX 90 1st series I love and would rather loose my hand than sell it...


I would toss my Questar 7 in the trash, rather than loose even the tip of a finger.
This is only a hobby after all.

#30 jmasin

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 10:31 AM

I'm lost, what watch should I buy again? :lol:

(I'm a watch collector also)

#31 RossSackett

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 11:08 AM

Here is a short film on the subject


That is hilarious. We've all been there.

#32 Yu Gu

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 11:11 AM

Because they are expensive, they must be special :tonofbricks:

They wouldn't compete as well if they were cheaper...

So they have to be expensive...

Just like a Leica, or many other brands...

what in heavens name is so special about a questar telescope. aperture is aperture and these scopes are so small, what can you see with them that makes them so expensive. donnie



#33 ColoHank

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 12:57 PM

I tried out to a 1958 or 59 Questar in the early 90's,
It was a beautiful telescope, built to the highest standard machine wise. I loved to have it in my hands feeling the Buttery smooth action. But under the stars it was a real dog!



Reading between the lines, it appears that particular Questar was a used instrument which you once considered buying. If that's indeed the case, then you're lucky to have discovered its many faults before plunking down any cash.

In another thread, however, you claim to have owned the scope, and you voice the same criticisms of its performance. If that's true, and if you had a chance to examine it and observe through it before purchase, then why did you buy it?

If the scope was used, perhaps the previous owner mistreated it somehow, in which case Questar would be under no obligation to repair it under warranty. Or perhaps, though the previous owner handled it with kid gloves, it simply needed a cleaning and tune-up. After several decades of even careful use, I'd expect moving parts to wear, lubricants to dry out, etc.

Questars are not warranted for life, as you allege. They are warranted for only ten years. If the scope was actually 32 years old when you either owned or considered buying it, then it would be unreasonable to expect the company to repair it under warranty.

Finally, Questar maintains a parts inventory, or can manufacture the parts anew, for every scope it ever made since the mid-1950s, and the company willingly accepts any and all of its scopes for repair or refurbishing regardless of age. If an instrument returned to them is not under warranty, Questar rightly charges for those parts and services.

Here's hoping that you continue to enjoy marvelous views through your ETX and B&L scopes for many years to come, and that you never have to return them to their manufacturers for warranty (or other) repairs.

#34 blave

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 06:01 PM

what in heavens name is so special about a questar telescope. aperture is aperture and these scopes are so small, what can you see with them that makes them so expensive. donnie


I first saw the famous cutaway image of a Questar 3.5" scope in my then-new copy of The Telescope Guide and Star Atlas book, which was one the two astro books I got from my parents on my 21st birthday, and wanted one from that moment on (I can't tell you how many times I opened that book just to look at the cutaway). Twenty-nine years later I finally bought myself one for my 50th birthday... It certainly has its limits but its functionality and portability cannot be beat by anything, not to mention its craftsmanship and overall quality. Yes, they're very expensive (I bought a restored 1972 model, as even I couldn't justify $5K for a new one) but I will keep mine "forever".

dark skies,

Dave B.
San Jose, CA

#35 Darren Drake

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 06:05 PM

I see that cutaway Q every time I'm at work. Check out the link from the earlier in this thread....

#36 jouster

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 08:03 PM

I wouldn't buy one - I need more aperture for my dollar that they can give me - but I always check them out at NEAF. They are so beautifully made.

#37 teskridg

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 10:23 PM

I'm lost, what watch should I buy again? :lol:

(I'm a watch collector also)


I have an Omega Seamaster, and my friends with Rolexes say it keeps better time; of course, if accuracy is an issue, then get the Casio. Tim

#38 ukcanuck

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 06:01 AM

I'm lost, what watch should I buy again? :lol:

(I'm a watch collector also)


I have an Omega Seamaster, and my friends with Rolexes say it keeps better time; of course, if accuracy is an issue, then get the Casio. Tim


I have a vintage Automatic Omega Constellation. It falls asleep after two days if I don't keep wearing it and is a bit of a pain at times...but I don't care. I love wearing it.

I bet there are discussions very similar to this on watch forums too! :grin: I think the watch analogy is a rather good one. I've been to a few watch shows in London and see enthusiasists/collectors appreciate why the time consumed in building things by hand results in a watch that can carry a 4, 5-figure or even 6 figure sum (or higher still). Sometimes the movement can be a mass-produced ETA example and the work is in the casing or complications, but for the really high prices how about a watch with a custom mechanism and a Tourbillon?

For what it is and what it represents, I actually think the Questar is quite reasonably priced. :cool:

Just my two :penny:

#39 ahopp

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 08:39 AM

I'm lost, what watch should I buy again? :lol:

(I'm a watch collector also)


I have an Omega Seamaster, and my friends with Rolexes say it keeps better time; of course, if accuracy is an issue, then get the Casio. Tim


I have a vintage Automatic Omega Constellation. It falls asleep after two days if I don't keep wearing it and is a bit of a pain at times...but I don't care. I love wearing it.

I bet there are discussions very similar to this on watch forums too! :grin: I think the watch analogy is a rather good one. I've been to a few watch shows in London and see enthusiasists/collectors appreciate why the time consumed in building things by hand results in a watch that can carry a 4, 5-figure or even 6 figure sum (or higher still). Sometimes the movement can be a mass-produced ETA example and the work is in the casing or complications, but for the really high prices how about a watch with a custom mechanism and a Tourbillon?

For what it is and what it represents, I actually think the Questar is quite reasonably priced. :cool:

Just my two :penny:


I use a winder at night. Place your watch on the winder when you are not using it and it will stay wound.

Tony

#40 Mike E.

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 02:35 PM

.........For what it is and what it represents, I actually think the Questar is quite reasonably priced. :cool:


I would agree, and no upgrading needed. Watches like Omega and Rolex are also worth the investment. My current Yachtmaster watch has increased 43% in value since I purchased it four and a half years ago; what bank will give you that kind of return ?
I believe Questar scopes will hold their value long into the future, like Skylight Refractors. :cool:

#41 Panotaker

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 04:05 PM

Questars are not necessary expensive, you just have to know how to shop. Two years ago, I didn't own any Questars. Today I own four of them, and I have only spent $1000 total. The first one I bought is a 1959 model Standard. I paid $150 from a local picker. The solar filter was cross threaded on, so he thought it was broke because he couldn't see anything through it. Scope looks absolutely brand new. Second one is a Questar birder with all the options. I paid $400 for that one from another picker out of state. I thought I was going to get burnt on that one because the guy wanted me to send him a money gram to the local Walmart. I figured since I was ahead on the first one, if I lost $400, I would still be ahead. 3 days later, a prestine Questar birder showed up with not even a speck of dust on it. I don't know how many Questar Birders where sold with the fast focuser, but I don't know of anyone else that has one. The third one is a Questar field model. This one was owned by a 80 year old widow. She was giving it away for free on craigslist and had no takers till I showed up. She was actually trying to sell a broken tripod for $100 and was giving away the scope that was mounted on it at the time her husband broke the tripod. I emailed her and asked about the scope. She said her husband told her that the scope broke when the tripod broke. I offered her $100 for the broken scope and told her she could keep the tripod. So I sent her $150 to cover shipping and figured that the two eyepieces where worth at least that much. A few days later, a perfect Questar field model shows up. So I called her and offered to send her more money for the scope, but she refused. She was happy it went to a good home. A few days later, she mails me a check for $30 because it only cost her $20 to ship me the scope. I still have the check. The fourth one is a 700mm Questar lens that I got on Ebay for $400. No one else bid on it. The lens has a bunch of scratches on the body, but the optics are perfect. The lens belonged to a pro that used it in Africa, so that explained all the scratches on the body. So no, not all Questar scopes are expensive, and deals are still out there to be found. You just have to be patient and do a lot of digging.

#42 Darren Drake

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 04:11 PM

Wow now thats some good luck. Any of those would be the deal of the decade and you found all that in 2 years. I need to check Craigslist more often and get to know some local pickers....

#43 wz2

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 02:13 PM

The first one I bought is a 1959 model Standard. I paid $150 from a local picker.


OK, I'll bite, what's a "picker?"

Chris

#44 Panotaker

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 03:52 PM

A picker is somebody that bids and buys abandon storage lockers. When people rent a storage locker to store their stuff, they have to pay monthly rent. If they don't pay, they auction off the contents of the storage locker. A picker is one of those persons that buys those lockers. They then sell off the contents little by little and try to make a profit. They also buy stuff from people that have a garage or barn full of junk. They will pick through their junk, and buy anything they think they can sell. Picking has become popular now because there are a bunch of TV shows that show the pickers making tons of money by finding all kinds of treasures in abandon storage lockers. In reality, most of the time they buy a locker full of somebody else's junk.

#45 notrix

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 03:22 PM

looks like I got a realy good scope at a heck of a deal.

#46 Stargazer3236

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 04:34 PM

Questar used to advertise in Sky and Tel and Astronomy many, many years ago. I know, I have seen them advertised in Sky&Tel in lavish adverts in the 1970's and 1980's issues. Then they stopped advertising them, I wonder why?

I have seen many a Questar up close and personal. I can't imagine what the big deal is. There have been side by side tests done on the optics and in a few cases, the ETX 90 was as good if not slightly better than Questar (not all, just a few). I like the old OTA design of the night sky in constellations like the old Sky&Tel monthly sky charts of olden days. You could also get a nice dew shield too. But then, Meade introduced the ETX PE or Premiere Edition with colorful images on their OTA's.

I guess it's like having the Mona Lisa of Telescopes, a rare example of a fine quality telescope for the elite astronomer.

#47 ChristianG

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 10:20 PM

Hi all.

Perhaps the difference in opinions about the optical performance of the Questar telescope comes from the fact that a standard MgF2 coated Questar has only about as much contrast as a stock C90 or ETX90, whereas a broad-band coated Questar is, lets say, much better...

I have compared three different Questars (two with BB coatings and one with MgF2 coatings) that were in good condition next to a C90, Apex 90 and ETX90, with an artificial star (working in a physics department has its perks). The collimation of all instruments was the best that could be achieved. All three Questars had much better star tests (i.e. similar inside- and outside-of-focus) than the Synta or Meade telescopes (outside-of-focus markedly different from inside-of-focus). The broad band coated Questars had much more contrast than the MgF2 coated one, or the other Maksutovs. This comparison finalized my decision to buy a Questar for myself, and I made sure that the one I ended up buying had the 'BB' at the end of the serial number.

As was pointed out, add a clock drive, tabletop equatorial mount, fine control knobs, switchable barlow, switchable finder through eyepiece, switchable axial camera port, solar filter (I opted for the full aperture filter), two good eyepieces, star and moon maps, extendable light/dew shield (other Maksutovs don't have one), small carrying case, and suddenly the price doesn't seem so outrageous.

For me, the telescope 'just works'. On a sturdy equatorial wedge, it's very nice. I run mine from the inverter that's part of a Goal Zero solar panel kit. And it seems to cool faster than the other Synta-made Maksutovs I have. Cheers!

--Christian






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