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Getting bummed out. Another permit thread.

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#26 roscoe

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 06:21 AM

A concern I have is that some smaller observatories that are built on top of concrete blocks or pads, the whole building could blow away in a big enough wind. Probably the scope pier would keep one in place, but something to think about, particularly with small structures. Mine, being small, relatively light weight, and in an open field, has four smaller concrete footing piers in the corners that it is bolted to, so wind won't get under it and lift it.
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#27 Starhawk

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 08:51 AM

My main concern is the op started with an apparent realization his construction quality wasn't good enough to get a modern permit in an area where it isn't actually a legal issue. If BYO has a tested design, it may be a very different animal, where getting an honest permit means structural upgrades. The op should expect the observatory will eventually be tested by the real thing.

-Rich

#28 csa/montana

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 10:30 AM

A concern I have is that some smaller observatories that are built on top of concrete blocks or pads, the whole building could blow away in a big enough wind. Probably the scope pier would keep one in place, but something to think about, particularly with small structures. Mine, being small, relatively light weight, and in an open field, has four smaller concrete footing piers in the corners that it is bolted to, so wind won't get under it and lift it.
Russ


My 10'x10' is just sitting on concrete footings. It has been in 70mph & higher gusts with absolutely no problems.

#29 Mary B

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 05:04 PM

Mine is sitting on wood bunkers, not bolted down at all. Being low to the ground helps keep wind out from under it. You can always add a ground skirt too.

#30 Gargoyle

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Posted 25 January 2013 - 10:04 PM

My 11' x 15' BYO (on concrete footings) shrugged Sandy off like it was nothing. I went into the building to get extension cords while Sandy was doing what she did (at 70 mph + at that point) and there was no roof rattle or any noise. Felt safer in the shed than I did in my house....

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#31 stmguy

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 08:42 AM

During the hurricane of '38 my parents house got blown right over (no one was living in it at the time) . A neighbor helped to right it with block and tackles. Nice to have good neighbors. House was OK, just imagine , this was before permits and building codes and the like of course nowadays the house would have been anchored down
Norm

#32 Wmacky

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 06:17 PM

Update:

But first about hurricanes -

Although anything is always possible, I do not live in a area of Florida prone to these storms. As a matter of fact I've lived all 48 years of my life here, and have never seen, experienced, or had any damage due to a hurricanes! New York is more prone to hurricanes than my county.

NO, My real concern is being told by the permitting department that I must destroy the building with no option to comply. THis is my only concern.

I've talked to the county, and I now feel that it would be a mistake, and a huge risk to try to permit it after the fact. I'll just have to deal with the issue if it every comes up. Hopefully they will work with me to avoid tearing the structure down. I see no reason to take that risk until I have to if ever. I don't have much risk up upset neighbors. I see the guy behind me just had another greenhouse moved in. this make about 6 large unpermitted structures with 150' of mine.


Anyway, I said what the hell, bought the last of the materials I needed, and completed the observatory today. All is complete except carpeting. In a couple weeks I will be posting a pictorial tour of the completed restoration, and you will then see why I have been bummed about have it demolished. It truly is a dream setup for me....

#33 csa/montana

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 06:38 PM

Anyway, I said what the hell, bought the last of the materials I needed, and completed the observatory today. All is complete except carpeting. In a couple weeks I will be posting a pictorial tour of the completed restoration, and you will then see why I have been bummed about have it demolished. It truly is a dream setup for me....



:bow: As I mentioned earlier; enjoy what you have, now; rather than worrying about what "might" happen in the future. You will have many enjoyable hours in your observatory, so start enjoying! :)

#34 csrlice12

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 04:53 PM

The way I understand it, is, if the building is not "up to code", if you sell, the buyer has the option of 1) asking you to bring it up to code (your answer-next customer); 2) accepting it "as is" (most likely, if not, see #1); or 3) asking you to remove it. Outside of that, I don't see a problem, unless you've sunk thousands into it and THEN decide it time to sell...Guess you have two options then 1) Options 1-3 above, or 2) Move it to the new place (again).

#35 Glen A W

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 08:09 PM

I used to live in a town which was obsessed with building permits and code enforcement. Eventually they hired a police officer to handle it. I did not have much trouble with it but I observed that the permit process was highly political, as some people could get permits for the most ridiculous projects - such as combining two houses next door to each other into one sick looking monster - while others couldn't get papers on an 8x12 outbuilding.

I am glad I now live 10 miles from the nearest incorporated area. It is up to me to make sure things are as they should be, and I try to do the best I can.

I would be nervous if I lived in Florida too, but because of the risk of neighbors making trouble more than anything. In my old town, you only had worries about these sorts of things if your neighbors disliked you. If somebody moves in next door and proves to be a psycho, then I can tell you that complaints to the municipality are just about the number-1 technique of the modern neighborhood troublemaker.

GW

#36 Starhawk

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:43 AM

There is no part of Florida not prone to hurricanes; just a few spots they haven't laid waste to recently. The house I had destroyed in Katrina had been high, dry, and undamaged since 1937, was above sea level, and surrounded by trees, some of which had been there for a century and survived 85mph winds. They got blown over and the brick house got moved off its foundation. 10' of water finished the job.

70 mph winds aren't hurricane force, and are fairly commonly experienced just about everywhere.

But I see complacency, too, is a force of nature. It'll be a little late to get squared away when you're ordered to evacuate. But you had better believe you neighbors' insurance adjuster will ask them, "Do you know of a nearby building this piece we found in your living room came from?"

Good luck. You're leaning a whole lot more on it than I've been able to.

-Rich

#37 Wmacky

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 12:22 AM

There is no part of Florida not prone to hurricanes; just a few spots they haven't laid waste to recently. The house I had destroyed in Katrina had been high, dry, and undamaged since 1937, was above sea level, and surrounded by trees, some of which had been there for a century and survived 85mph winds. They got blown over and the brick house got moved off its foundation. 10' of water finished the job.

70 mph winds aren't hurricane force, and are fairly commonly experienced just about everywhere.

But I see complacency, too, is a force of nature. It'll be a little late to get squared away when you're ordered to evacuate. But you had better believe you neighbors' insurance adjuster will ask them, "Do you know of a nearby building this piece we found in your living room came from?"

Good luck. You're leaning a whole lot more on it than I've been able to.

-Rich


Thanks again for your expert opinion......

Carol, Can you close this thread for me. I'd hate to see that dead horse get beat anymore.






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