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More Mars Treats

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#1 llanitedave

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 12:38 PM

I was looking through photos from the Curiosity rover last night, and this one from the "John Klein" site caught my eye. This is one of the areas where Curiosity may do its first drilling operation. Not only is there a tremendous concentration of veins on the ground there, they seem to be twisted and distorted -- either they are warping the bedding around them or the rock was fractured in odd ways prior to their emplacement.

I don't know what the mineral is, but they remind me very strongly of some of the clusters of gypsum veins visible near Lake Mead outside of Las Vegas.

First is the "John Klein" outcrop: (From an official NASA photo.)

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#2 llanitedave

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Posted 20 January 2013 - 12:40 PM

Next is some gypsum exposed in the side of a channel wall:

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#3 Jay_Bird

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 08:53 PM

Dave, we live in a fun part of the USA for Mars rover geology analogs. Those are great examples of veins in Nevada's tertiary sediments that look like what Curiousity is seeing.

From Red Rock west of Las Vegas to near Zion in Utah, we have a lot of older, mesozoic rocks with concretions (sometimes called Moqui marbles) that are similar to the "blueberries" on Mars too, found by Spirit/Opportunity.

#4 llanitedave

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 12:02 AM

Ah, you would bring that up! I've got some pictures of just that from the Aztec sandstone in the Gale Hills, about 10 miles from where the above photo was taken. They're on my desktop at home in the same folder as that one, but now I'm at work with my laptop for the next 10 days and don't have it handy. Otherwise I'd brag on that one too.

They aren't blueberries though, in that the main material is sandstone. The only difference is that the cement is harder than that of the surroundings. Not sure what it consists of.

For years, every time I've gone hiking north of Lake Meade, I identify with a Mars Rover -- there's just so much similar terrain to play in!

#5 Photobud

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:11 PM

A thread about the first night pics by Curiosity on another forum brought up a question in my mind. How bright is the surface on Mars at high noon compared to earth? Is it comparable to twilight? A cloudy day? All the pics seem to be adjusted to earth normal on a sunny day.






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