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mirror cleaning and cotton

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#26 Mike B

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 03:47 PM

It's cheaper than dirt.


I dunno... if you've ever had to import good fill, or topsoil, you'd find that dirt ain't quite so cheap.
:jawdrop:

Still, probably not among the better solutions for mirror cleaning...
:scratchhead:

#27 davidpitre

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 02:30 PM

Any thoughts from any of you about whether the type of tap water in the home (hard vs. soft) has any impact on the mirror?

Hard water will tend to leave more spotting than soft water (hard water will typically be higher in calcium and or magnesium both of which can account for the spotting). I'm not so sure I would want to use water run through a softener though, as the salt would likely be bad for the coatings. Most like to rinse with distilled water after rinsing any detergent. I don't see an advantage to washing with distilled water as a distilled water rinse quickly removes tap water

#28 jeff heck

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 03:44 PM

I just finished cleaning my mirror using the handwash method, came out perfect with no film/haze.
Also, kudos to the Teeter method of mirror removal, I now have a stress free method of mirror maintance. :waytogo:

#29 Víctor Martínez

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 04:17 PM

Does anyone know an effective and definitive method to remove watermarks even after using distilled water??

#30 nevy

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 04:42 PM

I found Isopropyl get rid of water marks.

#31 Víctor Martínez

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 05:31 PM

Directly on the mirror?

#32 nevy

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Posted 04 March 2013 - 07:27 PM

Yes , but be carefull if you have a hotspot as it can loosen the glue.

#33 Víctor Martínez

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 02:58 AM

Ok, thank you.

#34 Víctor Martínez

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Posted 05 March 2013 - 06:01 AM

Well, I just cleaned my secondary mirror with pure acetone, as shown in the video of Spectrum coatings and I can only say one thing, I'm releasing my secondary mirror, safe, quick and easy.
http://www.spectrum-...rints Video ...

#35 Xiaoding

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Posted 06 February 2014 - 06:01 PM

If the haze is difficult to remove, i wonder, if an alkaline based cleaner would work?

I haven't cleaned my mirror yet, so this is just theory for me.

I know, most dish soaps are alcohol based. So, they clean certain stuff, but not all. The water, for instance, helps get sugars off, since alcohol does not dissolve that. So, when cleaning furniture, I use alcohol, then water, then alcohol again.

So, try some alcohol, if that doesn't work, try an alkaline based cleaner. Spic and Span is such, and "Awesome Cleaner", sold here in the states.

Any yellow cleaner, that is very slippery, is alkaline based. Dissolves different things than alcohols.

Anyone tried alkaline on their mirrors? I know that alkaline does wonders for stained dishes and mugs. Let it soak, stains gone!

Another bit of cleaner info: all cleaners work one molecular layer at a time. So, it may take awhile, repeated applications, to get it all off.

#36 Starman1

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Posted 07 February 2014 - 05:49 PM

If the haze is difficult to remove, i wonder, if an alkaline based cleaner would work?

I haven't cleaned my mirror yet, so this is just theory for me.

I know, most dish soaps are alcohol based. So, they clean certain stuff, but not all. The water, for instance, helps get sugars off, since alcohol does not dissolve that. So, when cleaning furniture, I use alcohol, then water, then alcohol again.

So, try some alcohol, if that doesn't work, try an alkaline based cleaner. Spic and Span is such, and "Awesome Cleaner", sold here in the states.

Any yellow cleaner, that is very slippery, is alkaline based. Dissolves different things than alcohols.

Anyone tried alkaline on their mirrors? I know that alkaline does wonders for stained dishes and mugs. Let it soak, stains gone!

Another bit of cleaner info: all cleaners work one molecular layer at a time. So, it may take awhile, repeated applications, to get it all off.

Neither acids nor alkalis will be good on mirrors. The aluminum actually reacts to neutral water if contact is prolonged. It reacts more strongly to alcohol and acetone. Your ideal cleaner would be pH neutral, and contain a surfactant for cleaning, followed by distilled water (de-ionized if possible).






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