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Looking for recommendations for a field atlas

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#1 MG1962

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 01:30 AM

A recent discussion pointed out that daylight observing of the Moon can be very rewarding. I'd never done it because it never occurred to me. But my work schedule is such I could actually get a lot of daylight observing done.

So with that in mind, what do people think would be a good atlas to keep at the scope?

#2 Dave Chapman

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 08:41 AM

At the scope, I like the laminated, foldable, inexpensive S&T Field Map of the Moon, which comes in "normal" and "mirror-reversed" flavours (the latter for 'scopes with star diagonals). I also use the Moon Atlas app on my iPhone, which has the advantage of showing the position of the terminator.

clear skies

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#3 Rick Woods

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 02:52 PM

What Dave said.

#4 RobertED

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:18 PM

I also think the S&T Field Map of the Moon is an excellent choice!!! :waytogo:

#5 RobertED

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:19 PM

I also think the S&T Field Map of the Moon is an excellent choice!!! :waytogo:


...."what Dave AND Rick said!!!!".....

#6 Doc Willie

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:25 PM

If you can find one (out of print) Rukl's Atlas of the Moon is the top of the line. More recently Wood and Collins' 21st Century Atlas of the Moon and the Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlass have been discussed in the Stellar Media Forum here.

And for FREE, you can download and print out The Full Moon Atlas or Observing the Lunar 100. There are others discussed in the Stellar Media forum.

They all have their uses. Rukl is the most elegant. I think Wood and Collins is the best for being compact and using the most up-to-date images. The freebies are workable if your budget is limited. The only one I have found a disappointment is the Atlas of the Lunar Terminator. It is OK as a supplement, but I would not recommend it as one's primary atlas.

#7 Dave Chapman

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 03:46 PM

If you can find one (out of print) Rukl's Atlas of the Moon is the top of the line. More recently Wood and Collins' 21st Century Atlas of the Moon and the Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlass have been discussed in the Stellar Media Forum here.


All great atlases, to be sure, but I would keep those protected indoors! By the way, the S&T Field Map of the Moon has artwork by Rukl! (Forgot to mention that)

Dave

#8 PJ Anway

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 04:11 PM

In my opinion, Rukl's Atlas of the Moon is the best, but expensive and getting harder to find. A good second choice and much less expensive is Rukl's "A Concise Guide in Colour - Moon, Mars and Venus". Same lunar drawings in a smaller package.

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#9 RobertED

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 03:40 PM

Yeaahhhh!!..I got that too!! (Moon, Mars and Venus!) Hard to find, but well worth the effort, if/when you do find one!!!! :waytogo:

#10 stkoepke

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 10:55 PM

In my opinion, Rukl's Atlas of the Moon is the best, but expensive and getting harder to find. A good second choice and much less expensive is Rukl's "A Concise Guide in Colour - Moon, Mars and Venus". Same lunar drawings in a smaller package.



Just picked up one of those on Ebay for $25...there are 4 more on Amazon starting from about $25 to $33 also.

The next price point after that starts at $70 and goes up to the moon. $165 is the top used price although, there is one listed as new for just $347.

I was VERY, VERY lucky about a month ago and found a copy of "Astronomy - Atlas of the Moon" by Rukl on Barnes and Noble site for only $14 plus 4 to ship. The seller certainly did not know what that book was worth and I was not about to tell them....I did thank them and gave them 5 stars though.

Even though there are a lot of digital resources, either on websites, online maps and software to download free or even to purchase, I still find I like the good old fashioned book form the best most of the time.

#11 stkoepke

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Posted 24 January 2013 - 11:08 PM

Although not necessarily a "field guide", I would also recommend this Moon poster.

Only $15 and looks GREAT on the wall. Although my wife says it has to stay out in the obs, apparently it clashes with her interior decorating. That ok with me though.....

Nice to look at and plan what features or areas you want to visit through the eyepiece.
Cool to see the other side of the moon too.

#12 smallscopefanLeo

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 11:59 PM

Thank you for this tip, I just added it to my cart! I always loved wall charts growing up, had tons of National Geographic maps up papering most of my room :grin:

Although not necessarily a "field guide", I would also recommend this Moon poster.

Only $15 and looks GREAT on the wall. Although my wife says it has to stay out in the obs, apparently it clashes with her interior decorating. That ok with me though.....

Nice to look at and plan what features or areas you want to visit through the eyepiece.
Cool to see the other side of the moon too.



#13 Swamp Fox

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:10 AM

Although not necessarily a "field guide", I would also recommend this Moon poster.

Only $15 and looks GREAT on the wall. Although my wife says it has to stay out in the obs, apparently it clashes with her interior decorating. That ok with me though.....

Nice to look at and plan what features or areas you want to visit through the eyepiece.
Cool to see the other side of the moon too.


I also use this and have it on the wall in my garage. When I observe with the 12" Dob I roll the scope out of the garage and have this available as a reference.

#14 Rick Woods

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 01:54 PM

That's a great, great Moon map!

A couple of years ago I found a copy of the 1969 National Geographic that contained that map originally in a thrift store for 50 cents; the map looks like it had never even been unfolded! I opened it once to measure it for a frame; the next time will be to frame it for hanging in the observatory. Then, I'll have all three of the great classic NG space maps on the wall (Moon, Mars, & The Heavens).
National Geographic maps are awesome.

One nice feature about it is that it's rectified; a dime set anywhere on it will cover the same area, and everything is seen as from directly above.

(PS: It measures 28" x 42")

#15 Doc Willie

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Posted 30 January 2013 - 02:39 PM

If you can find one (out of print) Rukl's Atlas of the Moon is the top of the line. More recently Wood and Collins' 21st Century Atlas of the Moon and the Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlass have been discussed in the Stellar Media Forum here.


All great atlases, to be sure, but I would keep those protected indoors! By the way, the S&T Field Map of the Moon has artwork by Rukl! (Forgot to mention that)

Dave


Disagree. The 21st Century atlas is printed on thick glossy paper (almost card stock), and is spiral bound to lay flat and seems to me ideal for field use. At least that's my plan. Rukl will stay indoors.

#16 Sarkikos

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 02:20 PM

I'm going to use the 21st Century atlas in the field. It's not laminated, but it should stand up well to dew, as long as you don't let it lie out all night on a picnic table. There have been star atlases that are much less able to bear dew and outdoor usage.

Mike

#17 Rick Woods

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 07:21 PM

All the atlases mentioned here are excellent. And there are many others as well!

But again (and just IMO), the very best you can do is the fold-up S&T/Rukl atlas for something not bulky, ultra-convenient, very detailed, and easy to stash with the scope. I have *lots* of lunar atlases (not by design - it just sort of happened!), but the S&T one gets most of the use. The others get pulled out when I want to investigate something closer.

And it's cheap - only $10, last I looked. Not much to risk, and it may be all you need, for a while anyway.

#18 Swamp Fox

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:10 AM

But again (and just IMO), the very best you can do is the fold-up S&T/Rukl atlas for something not bulky, ultra-convenient, very detailed, and easy to stash with the scope. I have *lots* of lunar atlases (not by design - it just sort of happened!), but the S&T one gets most of the use. The others get pulled out when I want to investigate something closer.

And it's cheap - only $10, last I looked. Not much to risk, and it may be all you need, for a while anyway.


Rick makes an excellent point. I sometimes observe from the front yard, and when I do I will spread books out on the bench in my garage. But I live along the coast and deal with dew constantly. There is no way I would take paper atlases out to the telescope. Instead I use the laminated S&T map. In fact, I was afraid they may become unavailable like Rukl's atlas, so I bought 5 copies so I would never run out! ;)

#19 Sarkikos

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:30 AM

When I'm observing, I never place atlases on a table. I always have them right with me at the eyepiece. When I've bought atlases that are too big and cumbersome to use at the telescope, they wind up being left at home and not used at all, except maybe to look up a detail that isn't shown on a real field atlas.

I like the S&T laminated moon maps. But IME & IMO they are still a bit too big for easy use right at the eyepiece, even when folded up. I wish that they had folded the maps a couple more times.

I've thought about cutting them up into more manageable pieces, but I don't want to loose the continuity of having the whole face of the Moon available at once. Since they are cheap and still available, maybe I should buy one of each version to cut down to size.

Mike

#20 Rick Woods

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 11:10 AM

Mike, it sounds like you need "Moon Mars and Venus" by Rukl - do you have that already? The complete Rukl atlas, in a book the size of a moderately thick paperback novel? That's the ultimate in large scale but small size.

#21 Rick Woods

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 11:13 AM

In fact, I was afraid they may become unavailable like Rukl's atlas, so I bought 5 copies so I would never run out! ;)


Smart! That's what happens to everything I find useful. It'll be around for years, until I discover it - then it disappears.

#22 Sarkikos

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 11:19 AM

Rick,

Mike, it sounds like you need "Moon Mars and Venus" by Rukl - do you have that already? The complete Rukl atlas, in a book the size of a moderately thick paperback novel? That's the ultimate in large scale but small size.


Yep, I have MMV. Got it for a really nice price, too, shipped from England several years ago. I do like that size and image scale. It is pretty much ideal. But I'm reluctant to bring it out in the field and subject it to the Maryland dew. So it's pretty much a bookshelf queen.

Now if I had something like that, in the same size and format, but laminated, I would throw it in the equipment bag. Of course, I could scan the MMV, print out the pages, and have them laminated or slipped into cover sheets. But that is a lot of time and work. Especially since some of these newer lunar field atlases are coming close to an MMV.

Mike






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