Jump to content


Photo

Can i use this to polish

  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Wolfdale

Wolfdale

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 20 Oct 2012

Posted 23 January 2013 - 10:39 AM

Hello Tomorrow i will start with Polishing, Pitch i have already bought.
In many personal ATM sites i have read that ferric oxide can be used instead of Cerium oxide, If this is correct then can i use ferric oxide??
here i have sample image that is similar to one which found in local chemical store.
Posted Image

One thing i forgot to mention that in that Fe2O3 bottle it is mentioned that 95%, so what does that 95% mean?

Thanks in advance :bow:

#2 Norm Meyer

Norm Meyer

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 250
  • Joined: 08 Feb 2009
  • Loc: Warren, ME 04864

Posted 23 January 2013 - 11:09 AM

Wolf,
Fe203 is Jeweler's rouge and we do use that to polish glass.
The 95% probably has to do with the purity of it.
I would think you could use it to polish your mirror.

Regards
Norm

#3 FeynmanFan

FeynmanFan

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 586
  • Joined: 18 Feb 2011
  • Loc: N Colo front range

Posted 23 January 2013 - 04:24 PM

I would be leery of using it since it's doubtless ungraded for particle size. Optical grade rouge has been graded. You can do it yourself, using a technique in Texereau's "How to Make A Telescope", pg. 30. No doubt further info can be found by Googling "optical rouge".

#4 Wolfdale

Wolfdale

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 20 Oct 2012

Posted 24 January 2013 - 04:28 AM

Thank you

#5 SteveNH

SteveNH

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 700
  • Joined: 09 Jul 2011
  • Loc: Millbrae, CA

Posted 24 January 2013 - 02:37 PM

Neal Howard's "Standard Handbook for Telescope Making" also describes a step by step method of creating a batch of washed rouge, where you siphon out larger particles from a clean rouge-water mix. The washed rouge works slowly but predictably, great for the final stages of correction. I've always used it on tempered burgundy pitch for the final stages, and found it produces a hard to beat ultra-smooth optical figure.

#6 JohnH  Happy Birthday!

JohnH

    Vanguard

  • ****-
  • Posts: 2135
  • Joined: 04 Oct 2005
  • Loc: Squamish BC Moved!!!!!

Posted 24 January 2013 - 04:35 PM

Wolf,
Fe203 is Jeweler's rouge and we do use that to polish glass.
The 95% probably has to do with the purity of it.
I would think you could use it to polish your mirror.

Regards
Norm


My brother does jewelry and uses this stuff to polish but it CAN contain larger particles that on metal would be fine, but would result in scratches on glass

#7 John Carruthers

John Carruthers

    Skiprat

  • *****
  • Posts: 3543
  • Joined: 02 Feb 2007
  • Loc: Kent, UK

Posted 25 January 2013 - 04:59 AM

I would go for optical grade cerium oxide or tin oxide or optical rouge, any contamination can result in wasted labour.
As others have said, you can elutriate the rouge you have, put it in a tall jar with a tiny drop of soap and shake it up to break down any clumps, let it settle for a few seconds so the larger particles drop to the bottom, syphon off the liquid containing the small particles still in suspension. Run the saved suspension through a coffee filter paper, dry it and store it carefully.

#8 Wolfdale

Wolfdale

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 42
  • Joined: 20 Oct 2012

Posted 25 January 2013 - 11:41 AM

Thanks looks it like its very critical. My money wasted in buying that. I dont want my mirror to be get scratch after lots n lots of hard labour. :tonofbricks:

I will purchase cerium oxide and i hope it will not contain any larger particle. :jump:

Thanks again for the help, but using rouge will be very risky i dont know that earlier otherwise, i would not have buyed it.

BTW in our local ATM club they are using it and forced me to buy it and giving me 100% assure that there will be no problem at all. :lol: :roflmao:

#9 John Carruthers

John Carruthers

    Skiprat

  • *****
  • Posts: 3543
  • Joined: 02 Feb 2007
  • Loc: Kent, UK

Posted 27 January 2013 - 04:22 AM

If the rouge comes from a good source and is for optics then use it by all means, if in doubt get fresh.

#10 Rockâ„¢

Rockâ„¢

    Sputnik

  • -----
  • Posts: 27
  • Joined: 18 Mar 2012

Posted 27 January 2013 - 12:05 PM

Hi Wolfdale, you can use that to polish. Here also some of the people use and found no problem at all.
But be sure that it is of optical quality.






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics