Jump to content


Photo

Tasco Halley's Comet Binoculars

  • Please log in to reply
34 replies to this topic

#26 David E

David E

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4716
  • Joined: 25 May 2006
  • Loc: North Carolina

Posted 02 February 2013 - 07:40 AM

I got my first good viewing session in last night. I must say that for astronomy these are really nice binoculars! The field curvature I noticed in daytime viewing was not much of a bother against the night sky. The stars were reasonably sharp mostly to the edge, with the brightest stars becoming the most distorted. Even with the slight distortion the stars still look like stars, not comets or cross hairs. With no rectilinear distortion it was really nice to pan across the sky. The TFOV I would say is right at 6º. I can easily get the belt and sword of Orion in the same field with plenty of room to spare. In Auriga, I could just squeeze in M36, M37, and M38 in the same field but it was really tight. The color correction is excellent, with Sirius glowing a bright white, but there is a bit of a warm tint, noticeable mostly on the Moon. Stars have good color saturation with red giants showing up nicely in their orange to red colors. My only complaint is the very short focusing distance of the focus wheel. It makes it a bit hard to nail the focus. Also, from my suburban skies I prefer something with a smaller exit pupil, the 7x50 gives a bit of a washed out sky. But overall, the quality of the optics, fit and finish, and comfortable grip make this one I would highly recommend if you happen to stumble across one.
:jump:

#27 KennyJ

KennyJ

    The British Flash

  • *****
  • Posts: 34239
  • Joined: 27 Apr 2003
  • Loc: Lancashire UK

Posted 02 February 2013 - 11:28 AM

I hear an increasing number of observers complaining about 7mm exit-pupils providing washed--out images.It was almost unheard of 30 or 40 years ago, and I wonder if increased light pollution has played it's part in that.

It's useful to remember how easy it is to make objective masks and many may be surprised what a difference it makes to mask a 50mm bino down to 30mm or thereabouts.

Kenny

#28 GlennLeDrew

GlennLeDrew

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10580
  • Joined: 17 Jun 2008
  • Loc: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

Posted 02 February 2013 - 12:07 PM

Even under quite dark skies, where the Gegenschein is visible, I find those big exit pupils to deliver an almost distractingly bright sky. It's fine when my unaided eye is showing me such a bright sky, but through an instrument I generally like the darker view provided by a 4-5mm pupil, getting down to 3mm from the suburbs.

#29 Mr. Bill

Mr. Bill

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 6109
  • Joined: 09 Feb 2005
  • Loc: Northeastern Cal

Posted 02 February 2013 - 12:27 PM

Likewise....

:cool:

#30 David E

David E

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4716
  • Joined: 25 May 2006
  • Loc: North Carolina

Posted 02 February 2013 - 02:23 PM

Even under quite dark skies, where the Gegenschein is visible, I find those big exit pupils to deliver an almost distractingly bright sky. It's fine when my unaided eye is showing me such a bright sky, but through an instrument I generally like the darker view provided by a 4-5mm pupil, getting down to 3mm from the suburbs.


My favorite pair of deep space binoculars is my 12x36 Canon IS. :ubetcha:

#31 Rich V.

Rich V.

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4037
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Lake Tahoe area, Nevada, USA

Posted 02 February 2013 - 02:25 PM

Even under mag. 6.5 skies, there's a huge difference in sky background brightness between 10x70s and 16x70s, for instance. For me, the 4.4mm exit pupils give a far more satisfying view than 7mm.

I'm actually quite happy with 3mm exit pupils... ;)

Rich

#32 David E

David E

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4716
  • Joined: 25 May 2006
  • Loc: North Carolina

Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:00 PM

Even under mag. 6.5 skies, there's a huge difference in sky background brightness between 10x70s and 16x70s, for instance. For me, the 4.4mm exit pupils give a far more satisfying view than 7mm.

I'm actually quite happy with 3mm exit pupils... ;)

Rich


Indeed, people routinely view deep space objects in telescopes at 3mm exit pupil or less, and then I often read how people think 3mm is too small for binoculars. :shrug:

#33 Rich V.

Rich V.

    Skylab

  • *****
  • Posts: 4037
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Lake Tahoe area, Nevada, USA

Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:26 PM

I take all the exit pupil talk with a grain of salt...two of my best astro binoculars have 3.3mm and 3mm exit pupils. Even 50x100mm is quite satisfactory. I guess Canon IS users are poor, deluded souls as well. ;)

Rich

#34 Mark9473

Mark9473

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8604
  • Joined: 21 Jul 2005
  • Loc: 51°N 4°E

Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:27 PM

Even under mag. 6.5 skies, there's a huge difference in sky background brightness between 10x70s and 16x70s, for instance. For me, the 4.4mm exit pupils give a far more satisfying view than 7mm.


Or is it the 16x magnification? You should compare your 10x70 with a 10x44, or your 16x70 with a 16x112.

At a given magnification, from a purely aesthetical point of view, I would prefer the largest exit pupil. When I had a 7x50 I found the image bright! And colourful! "Washed out" to me is something different, it implies something is lost from the image. The opposite is true, it is the binocular having smaller exit pupil where something is lost, the image is "dimmed down".

That said, image aesthetics isn't everything, and I don't have those 7x50 anymore. My eyes don't give a nice sharp image when the entire pupil is illuminated.

#35 David E

David E

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4716
  • Joined: 25 May 2006
  • Loc: North Carolina

Posted 02 February 2013 - 06:21 PM

Mark, when I mentioned "washed out" I was refering to the background sky, although I probably wasn't clear about that. I'd say that star colors are definately well saturated, no washing out there.






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics