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Slowly getting them all

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#1 Astrojensen

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 05:06 PM

A few days ago, a kind person asked me on the Danish Astro-Forum.dk, whether I was interested in a nearly brand new ES 8.8 82° eyepiece. He had previously mentioned selling it, since he felt the eye relief was a bit on the tight side for him and I had offered to buy it, if he made up his mind about selling it. Now he had decided to do so, and I immediately bought it, for little over half new price. Not bad! It's on its way, but it didn't arrive here today, so it'll be here on monday at the earliest and if I am not at home when the mailman arrives, I'll have to pick it up at the post office on tuesday.

Got half the set now: 30mm, 18mm, 11mm and 8.8mm. Now I just need the 24mm, 14mm, 6.7mm and 4.7mm. :grin:

But if I can swing it, I *might* go for the ES 14/100° instead! If I hadn't got this excellent offer, I'd ordered the 9mm 100° before the sale closes here in Europe. The main dealer has a sale until February 28th.

I have a hard time resisting them, but I also desperately need a servo steering kit for the tractor. Oh dear.

Life is full of temptations. :grin:


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#2 mgwhittle

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 05:26 PM

Congratulations, the 8.8 is an excellent performer. I have the whole set but find that I only use the 30, 18, 11, 8.8 and rarely the 6.7. If I had to do it again I would skip the ones you don't have. Are you truly needing those focal lengths or do you just want the complete set?

#3 PJ Anway

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 05:29 PM

Congratulations Thomas. I haven't had a chance to use those eyepieces yet, but if you like 'em, I'm sure they must be excellent.

#4 MRNUTTY

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 05:57 PM

I'm sorry I sold all my 82's and 68's. great EP's!

#5 HTJ

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Posted 26 January 2013 - 07:02 PM

Hi Thomas. I hope my (former) eyepiece will get a lot of usage :-)

As you wrote, I didn't find the ergonomics that great, and had the experience that I had to put the eye inside the eyepiece to see the full field. Other people get along just great with the eyepiece and that is fine. Figuring out which eyepieces fit one is a bit of a journey. I seem to require a lot of eye relief for wide fields. I get along with my 6 mm BGO very well.

Since we are doing temptations, I must admit that another reason I sold it was that a set of Pentax XW 7 & 10 mm found the way to me. They are extremely sharp and have insanely good ergonomics. I like them a lot.

Your money went towards buying what was perhaps the last pair of Circle-T 12.5 mm orthos available in the world (retail that is), for the binoviewer that I don't have yet.

#6 Astrojensen

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 02:44 AM

Hi everyone

Thanks for the replies!

@Mark: Well, I don't *have* to have the whole set. It just seems like they want to find their way to me...! I'll most likely end up getting the ES 4.7mm 82 as well, as I sometimes use extremely high magnifications and would often like some more field then. I have found it a lot easier to use high magnifications when the apparent field is large and the eye position is relatively relaxed. Looking into a 4mm ortho @ 800x is not exactly comfortable...

@PJ: They ARE excellent! Amazingly sharp and with ZERO glare and reflections.

@MRNUTTY: Well, they still make them, so...

@HTJ: Oohh! Pentax it is now! Not bad, not bad. I do have a pair of 12.5mm UO VT orthos for my binoviewer, but they are my second least used binoviewer pair. The least used is the 9mm pair. I've found that when binoviewing, eyepieces with great ergonomics and comfort are paramount. I now almost exclusively use my 25mm Zeiss microscope eyepieces and various correctors and barlows to get the magnification I want. I find this infinitely more comfortable than peeping through the small lenses of the 12.5mm orthos.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#7 ibase

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 08:52 AM

But if I can swing it, I *might* go for the ES 14/100° instead!.. Life is full of temptations. :grin:


The way to eliminate temptations is to yield to it. :grin:

Posted Image
100ES14mm & 82ES14mm-I

If you like the 82ES, you're gonna love the 100ES14mm. :jump:

Best,

#8 MRNUTTY

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 12:29 PM

LOL Thomas! I only sold them to finance a sortie into Televue territory, and they were redundant with the planned TV classes. ;-) I loved them! But as you say they're still I production, so at a later date I could buy them again If I so desired, however, I have far too many EP's in the 68-72 degree range, so only the 82 are desirable from a functional point of view. But, I'm really more interested in what ES have have up its sleeve for the future; the 100/5.5? More 3 inch? A set of ultra-performance Plossls, Orthos or Monocentrics? A super-zoom? The possibilities are all out there to speculate on :-)

#9 mgwhittle

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 01:29 PM

John,

You and I must be the only ones that want ES to come out with a line of Plossls. When I posed that possibility on the forums, I think everybody that responded said they had no interest. I, on the other hand, have my fingers crossed they will.

#10 Dave Ittner

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 01:39 PM

+1 for ES Plossls. I think there are a few cool things they could do to make them unique. Like get rid of the safety undercut for one.

#11 MRNUTTY

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 02:11 PM

Dave, and Mark, good to see others are thinking about this too. Lately, there is no high spec modern narrow field in production ( Brandon's excluded ) to go head to head with the old classics; Zeiss, TMB SuperMono, et. al. ... Not counting built to order EP's like Siebert's. Which However excellent, aren't universally recognized as such. Nor are they high enough volume to guarentee a reliable supply.

Hopefully the king-EP's performance isn't based purely on brand-power :) The Brandon and Pentax clearly have superior contrast and clarity, so know I can observe without a brand filter getting in the way. I would definately buy a set of highend narrow fields to complement my Brandon's and Siebert's.

#12 Astrojensen

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 02:31 PM

If we are talking about making a really high-end eyepiece, I don't think the König design should be ignored. I have a pair of 25mm Zeiss four-element König microscope eyepieces and they are *the* highest performing eyepieces I've ever seen, bar none. There are NO ghosts and reflections, NO glare, NO scatter, the field lens is so well coated, it's invisible; dust specs seem to float in mid-air. When you look through it, it's like there's no glass in there at all, a truly unreal feeling. Eye relief is about 25mm, with 28mm wide eye lenses, wider than the field lens. They are insanely sharp, bright and contrasty. They wipe the floor with my UO orthos.

When you look at the Moon with them, you have an unreal feeling of looking through a large hole (the field stops are focusable, so you can make them *extremely* sharp, which makes them appear huge and floating at distance in front of you, like a large window), a hole you can run up to and fall out of and fall into orbit around the Moon.

If ES could make a line of special binoviewer-prepared eyepieces such as these, then they would have something *truly* special. Cost would be an issue, however, as making eyepieces with this kind of attention to details is quite expensive. Some of the top-of-the-line Zeiss microscope eyepieces run at $2000 per eyepiece... I am not sure how much mine where when new from Zeiss, since I got them used, but they are made for ultra-expensive long-distance surgical microscopes...


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#13 mgwhittle

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Posted 27 January 2013 - 02:38 PM

Thomas,

ES is supposedly coming out with a binoviewer soon.....wouldn't it be nice if they did exactly like what you are suggesting....a special line of binoviewer eyepieces with an emphasis on low scatter, ect.

#14 Astrojensen

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:28 AM

Just received my 8.8mm today. It's like brand new and in original box. Hardly a speck of dust or any sign it has ever been used. Tried it quickly and have no problems seeing almost the whole field with comfort. It somehow feels even a little more comfortable than the 11mm! Quite contrary to what one might expect. If I made an effort to really get the whole field into view at the same time, some kidneybeaning began to make itself present, but when I just relaxed and looked at the center of the field, all problems went away and it felt very comfortable.

Now I just need some clear skies...


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#15 oo_void

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 08:36 PM

Funny, my ES127 came with a 2" 25mm eyepiece that looks quite a bit like a Plossl. Never did the research to find out exactly what design it is though.

#16 Astrojensen

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 03:23 AM

Amazingly, I was able to give the new ES 8.8 its first light last night, looking at the Moon through thin, drifting clouds. I was unable to really determine how sharp it was, but what I saw was just as impressive as what I've seen through the 30mm, 18mm and 11mm: No glare, no ghosts, no reflections, very high transmission, very high contrast, very comfortable ergonomics.

I was looking out my glass door, so the image quality wasn't the best, thus the problems with determining the sharness. But I could determine how comfortable it was and it passed with flying colors. Way more comfortable than my 9mm UO ortho and somewhat better than my 10mm GSO Superview.

I also experimented with my 2x barlow both the 11mm and the 8.8mm barlow extremely well. High power views were amazingly comfortable! This will be a boon to my deep-sky observing. Even at 192x (8.8mm+2x barlow on a 840mm focal length scope), I could get almost the entire Moon into the field! At this magnification I have only a few arcminutes less true field than I do with my 9mm UO at 93x! Going back to the 9mm UO was NOT comfortable at all! The views lost all context and it felt incredibly cramped. Especially if I tried the 9mm UO+barlow combination.

Don Pensack has said something along the lines that using modern widefield eyepieces allow you to see more, because they allow you to retain context of the object in its surrounding field, while allowing you to observe at much higher magnifications, thus darkening the background sky and magnifying small objects into visibility. I now believe this is totally true and while I have never been afraid to use high magnifications, doing so has just become tremendously much easier and enjoyable for me. I am already thinking of many objects that I want to revisit with much higher magnifications.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#17 Achernar

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Posted 29 January 2013 - 11:42 AM

Using modern widefield eyepieces allow you to see more, because they allow you to retain context of the object in its surrounding field, while allowing you to observe at much higher magnifications, thus darkening the background sky and magnifying small objects into visibility.

Indeed, what he stated is true. That is why I migrated to these eyepiece in favor of the Plossls, TMB Planetary, and Orion Stratuses I have been using for years. Finding faint objects with the endemic light pollution and milky skies can be very challenging, and anything that helps me minimize the effects of murky, lit up skies is a blessing.

Taras






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