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Should I Get Rid of the Telrad?

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#126 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 03:53 PM

There were several threads about cutting a Telrad down to size, with pics.



Don Pensock's comment was the most perceptive, "You don't need to cut the Telrad in half, only the base."

Jon

#127 stevew

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:40 PM

I for one, have always loved the legendary Telrad.
I currently own 3, and about 7 or 8 bases, so I can swap them out on different scopes. I have tried different red dot finders and found all but the TV Starbeam to be cheap imitations that use button type batteries that are expensive and don't last very long.

Most of the time I only use a Telrad with out any other optical finder. I have great success star hoping just using a Telrad and a low power eyepiece. I do this with everything from a 4 inch F-6 to a C11 and a 16 inch reflector.

Steve

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#128 rockethead26

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 06:11 PM

Hey Steve, where did you get the cool little triangular map tool?

#129 stevew

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 06:19 PM

Hey Steve, where did you get the cool little triangular map tool?


I bought it at my local astronomy shop back in the early 1990s. I have not seen any others since.
It's designed to mimic the Telrad pattern, and be sized for use with Sky Atlas 2000.
Wish I could point you in the direction to purchase one, but I'm not sure they are made any more.
I'm sure it would be easy enough to make one from a bit of plastic or glass.
Steve

#130 Doc Bob

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 07:05 PM

Hey Mike,
Send me your Telrad! I kinda like them and if you have any issues, they would be mitigated by ridding yourself of those pesky things. . . and you would enjoy listening to the lamentations of all those folks who disagree with you!!

And if you really missed the Telrad - I would immediately return it to you!

Needing one for my newly acquired DOB - your friend,
Bob

#131 rockethead26

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 08:11 PM

Hey Steve, where did you get the cool little triangular map tool?


I bought it at my local astronomy shop back in the early 1990s. I have not seen any others since.
It's designed to mimic the Telrad pattern, and be sized for use with Sky Atlas 2000.
Wish I could point you in the direction to purchase one, but I'm not sure they are made any more.
I'm sure it would be easy enough to make one from a bit of plastic or glass.
Steve


Thanks! Well, money saved for other goodies. I've never seen one before.

#132 johnnyha

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 08:46 PM

The half-Telrad mod is interesting. I would mount the battery on the top though... or, there also appears to be enough room inside for AAA batteries... :question:

#133 Sarkikos

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 09:00 PM

Hey Mike,
Send me your Telrad! I kinda like them and if you have any issues, they would be mitigated by ridding yourself of those pesky things. . . and you would enjoy listening to the lamentations of all those folks who disagree with you!!

And if you really missed the Telrad - I would immediately return it to you!

Needing one for my newly acquired DOB - your friend,
Bob


Hi Bob,

Sorry, but I've decided to keep the Telrad just for my 10" Dob when I go to the dark site, at least for now. After I have a chance to try my ES finder on the C6, I might want to replace the Telrad on the 10" with the ES finder, too. So it looks like you'll have to wait for that Telrad. If I ever get rid of it, you'll be the first to know. ;)

On the other hand, Telrads are pretty cheap, compared to a lot of the other accessories amateurs buy for their scopes. You could just buy one. :shrug:

Since the Telrad is such an inexpensive gizmo, I'm kind of surprised that it's developed such a loyal fan base. Think about it. The Telrad doesn't cost multiple hundreds of dollars, it has no green letters, there is no long waiting list to buy one, I doubt if it's ever backordered, it's not made in Japan or Germany ... what's up with that?

(Wait for the obvious answer from the usual suspects.)

:grin:
Mike

P.S.: What is your newly acquired Dob? I don't see it in your sig. You know that under the TOS, any new acquisition over $50 is supposed to be listed down there.

#134 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 09:36 PM

Since the Telrad is such an inexpensive gizmo, I'm kind of surprised that it's developed such a loyal fan base. Think about it. The Telrad doesn't cost multiple hundreds of dollars, it has no green letters, there is no long waiting list to buy one, I doubt if it's ever backordered, it's not made in Japan or Germany ... what's up with that?



Good stuff doesn't have to be expensive nor fancy.

Lew Chilton's short piece on the invention of the Telrad is always a good read:

Lew Chilton and the Telrad

Jon

#135 stevew

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 10:09 PM

Hands up for those that have left their Telrad turned on only to discover it was turned on during the next observing session... :bigblush:

Those batteries seem to last forever.....

Steve

#136 Sarkikos

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 10:36 PM

Good stuff doesn't have to be expensive nor fancy.


+1 :waytogo:

Mike

#137 GeneT

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 10:56 PM

I recommend both a Telrad and an optical finder. They complement each other very well. I prefer the Telrad over any other red dot finder.

#138 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 02:36 PM

A Telrad is the only finding device on my 12.5" truss-tube Dob and I've managed to observe a lot of objects using it.

Dave Mitsky

#139 Doc Bob

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 06:05 PM

Hi Mike, et al;
The DOB is a 2006 model Zumell 10" f/4.92 - given to me for trial - if I like it, my friend will get a couple of hundred $$. Honesty, I can't see not buying this scope! It's very nice!! There's a Telrad mount already attached. So far it seems like a really nice scope. . . of course since I received it - the sky has been nothing but clouds and snow!!! So the curse extends to trials as well as purchases ! ! ! Go figure.

Looking forward to joining you in the Hershel 400 search at our dark site ! !

Good viewing,
Bob

#140 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 07:46 PM

I recommend both a Telrad and an optical finder. They complement each other very well. I prefer the Telrad over any other red dot finder.


:waytogo:

That's about the long and short of it.. 138 posts and you said all that needs be said.

Jon

#141 Sarkikos

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 10:00 PM

Bob,

The DOB is a 2006 model Zumell 10" f/4.92 - given to me for trial - if I like it, my friend will get a couple of hundred $$. Honesty, I can't see not buying this scope! It's very nice!! There's a Telrad mount already attached. So far it seems like a really nice scope. . . of course since I received it - the sky has been nothing but clouds and snow!!! So the curse extends to trials as well as purchases ! ! ! Go figure.


Welcome to the 10" Dob Club! There are many illustrious members here on CN. The 10" Dob has been called the largest of the small scopes ... or is that the smallest of the large scopes? :thinking: Anyway, you'll enjoy it.

Looking forward to joining you in the Hershel 400 search at our dark site ! !


IME & IMO, a 10" Dob is the best scope for tackling the H400's: enough light grasp to handle the task with just enough challenge to make it interesting. I have one more H400 object to bag. I would have found it last time at the dark site, but I had accidently left it off my Object List in SkySafari. Definitely next time I'll finish the H400's!

:grin:
Mike

#142 okieav8r

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 10:27 PM

I recommend both a Telrad and an optical finder. They complement each other very well. I prefer the Telrad over any other red dot finder.


:waytogo:

That's about the long and short of it.. 138 posts and you said all that needs be said.

Jon


That, and "do whatever floats your boat'.

#143 Sarkikos

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 11:20 PM

For me, star hopping with just a Telrad would be too much of a bother. Do I really want to map out how many Telrad circles of 4 or 2 degrees I would need to reach a certain object? No, not really. That's too much like work for my taste. The less plotting of degrees, star hops and Telrad circles the better.

Instead, I sight on the nearest visible star with the Telrad, then use Sky Safari and the optical finder to star hop to the object. Easy sneezy. I can do this on-the-fly with no preplanning. As a bonus, I get to see the route and destination with a nice rich-field telescope, my 15x70 finder. You don't get that if you just use a Telrad.

Mike

#144 okieav8r

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 12:39 AM

For me, star hopping with just a Telrad would be too much of a bother. Do I really want to map out how many Telrad circles of 4 or 2 degrees I would need to reach a certain object? No, not really. That's too much like work for my taste. The less plotting of degrees, star hops and Telrad circles the better.

Instead, I sight on the nearest visible star with the Telrad, then use Sky Safari and the optical finder to star hop to the object. Easy sneezy. I can do this on-the-fly with no preplanning. As a bonus, I get to see the route and destination with a nice rich-field telescope, my 15x70 finder. You don't get that if you just use a Telrad.

Mike


I can't argue with your point about rich field views, Mike. Sometimes, those are best.

#145 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 04:40 AM

For me, star hopping with just a Telrad would be too much of a bother. Do I really want to map out how many Telrad circles of 4 or 2 degrees I would need to reach a certain object? No, not really. That's too much like work for my taste. The less plotting of degrees, star hops and Telrad circles the better.



That is not really how it works, any such mapping is generally unnecessary and if is necessary, Sky Safari shows separations.

Using the Telrad is all about matching patterns and positioning the Telrad circles relative to stars that are visible naked eye. It's very effective if the skies are reasonably dark and it's a whole lot simpler than using a magnifying finder because it can be done with stars that are visible naked eye. Instead of using the Telrad like a red dot finder, and then using the magnifying finder, I find that most often, I am able to point the telescope directly at the object using the Telrad alone.

If you don't want to use it, don't. But let others who do know how to use the Telrad effectively discuss it's use.

Jon

#146 bilgebay

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 04:56 AM

I love Telrad so much so that I use it with all my scopes. Makes life so much easy for me!

Posted Image

Posted Image

I am amazed at people's ability to talk on such a simple subject for 8 pages! You guys must be all retired :)




#147 Sarkikos

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 07:06 AM

Jon,

That is not really how it works, any such mapping is generally unnecessary and if is necessary, Sky Safari shows separations.


I do think that's how it works for some folks who use Telrads. Not all by any means, but some. I've seen their discussions about preplanning for Telrad hops in other threads, and in this one, I believe. Some people just like all that prepwork figuring out hops, charting asterisms, and drawing little Telrad circles on star charts. Come on, you know they do. :grin: Maybe these are mostly observers who still depend on printed star charts and don't want to "upgrade" to SkySafari and other electronic tools. :shrug:

Using the Telrad is all about matching patterns and positioning the Telrad circles relative to stars that are visible naked eye. It's very effective if the skies are reasonably dark and it's a whole lot simpler than using a magnifying finder because it can be done with stars that are visible naked eye.


I do some of that, also. Geometrical triangulation. But for me, I think it would be a bother to do it for most objects. Maybe it is easier if you are under black or grey zone skies. I wouldn't know. My dark site is yellow zone, and I have to travel an hour one way to reach that. The nearest black/grey zone is over six hours away. I'm not one for long road trips. That would not be easy and would not be worth the time and effort, IMO. That's just not happen'. I think many if not most observers share similar circumstances.

If you don't want to use it, don't. But let others who do know how to use the Telrad effectively discuss it's use.


I'm not stopping anyone from saying anything. Only the TOS and the Moderators can do that.

Mike

#148 RogerRZ

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 07:12 AM

I love Telrad so much so that I use it with all my scopes. Makes life so much easy for me!

Posted Image

Posted Image

I am amazed at people's ability to talk on such a simple subject for 8 pages! You guys must be all retired :)



That backwards mounted Telrad would make star-hopping challenging, wouldn't it? ;)

#149 Sarkikos

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 07:13 AM

I am amazed at people's ability to talk on such a simple subject for 8 pages! You guys must be all retired :)


No, I'm not retired. But I will be in the near future. Just wait until then and see how many pages I churn out!

:grin:
Mike

#150 bilgebay

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 07:22 AM


That backwards mounted Telrad would make star-hopping challenging, wouldn't it? ;)


Thank you for your keen eye :) Very funny indeed.

I must have seated the scope into the clamshell the wrong way. I was very excited to try my new adaptation of the
Micro Touch motor to FSQ focus knob.






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