Jump to content


Photo

A question or two about solar filters

  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Gert K A

Gert K A

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 291
  • Joined: 16 Jul 2012
  • Loc: Copenhagen, Denmark

Posted 31 January 2013 - 03:19 AM

I’m considering to try a bit of solar observing or at least to have the option to
I’m looking to buy my first solar filter for my tiny 50mm refractor.
I’m at the time looking at these:
Thousand Oaks
Orion

Which is better, is there any difference between these, are there better ones?

Also is it “enough” just to plug one of these on your scope, or is other equipment needed, for safety or details.. filters, diagonals?

Any help would be greatly apreciated

#2 Matt Wastell

Matt Wastell

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2293
  • Joined: 05 Jul 2009
  • Loc: Paddington, Brisbane, Australia

Posted 31 January 2013 - 04:18 AM

Hi Gert
I have a thousand oaks filter and it is good wide field views with my 90mm.
I have heard that bader film is a much better option - I have no experience with the film but I am sure others will post their views.
I also believe you will not need any other equipment, suitable filter and go. Just be mindful to be safe and remove your finder scope / remove or cover it!

#3 robert_arnold

robert_arnold

    Gemini

  • -----
  • Posts: 3028
  • Joined: 08 Nov 2005
  • Loc: Isle of Skye, Scotland

Posted 31 January 2013 - 05:54 AM

Baader astrosolar film is better optically than a glass filter and much cheaper
Robert

#4 Gert K A

Gert K A

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 291
  • Joined: 16 Jul 2012
  • Loc: Copenhagen, Denmark

Posted 31 January 2013 - 08:34 AM

Film just scare me a bit.
Actually the thought of aligning the sun, a lens and my eye scare me a bit, and then the softer material.
I do know a lot of ppl are happy using it and I’m sure there is no issue but it's still kind off scary :scratchhead:
How is the film better optically, does it give more detail?

#5 BYoesle

BYoesle

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4901
  • Joined: 12 Jun 2004
  • Loc: Goldendale, Washington USA

Posted 31 January 2013 - 09:44 AM

These types of filters go over the objective, reducing the intensity of the solar image by a factor of 100,000+ X, and are completely safe.

Regarding Baader film - Yes, optically it is better than any float glass solar filter likke the T. Oaks or Orion. It is equivalent to a Zeiss or Questar optical galss filter, but gives a more neutral colored image. It may not last as long (it developes pinholes more easily) , but is easy and cheap to replace. Whether or not you could discern its superiority on a regular basis depends on your local seeing and observing skill.

The only thing significantly better is a Herschel wedge, which is much more expensive, and requires strick adherence to it's use of additional fltering.

See:

http://www.cloudynig...php?item_id=919

http://www.astro-phy..._acc/astrosolar

Baader solar filter material is available premounted here:

http://www.kendricka...larfilters.html

#6 Gert K A

Gert K A

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 291
  • Joined: 16 Jul 2012
  • Loc: Copenhagen, Denmark

Posted 31 January 2013 - 10:52 AM

Wow great info, it seems the Baader film trumps it all
very nice thx Bob

So pinholes are present to some degree in all front filters,
do you check every time before use, or does pinholes not represent a safety issue?

btw. I totally love the little Kendrick finder

#7 BYoesle

BYoesle

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4901
  • Joined: 12 Jun 2004
  • Loc: Goldendale, Washington USA

Posted 31 January 2013 - 11:26 AM

Pinholes, even a significant number, don't pose a safety issue - they instead scatter light and decrease contrast. This is why a Herrschel wedge usually proves superior.

#8 Gert K A

Gert K A

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 291
  • Joined: 16 Jul 2012
  • Loc: Copenhagen, Denmark

Posted 31 January 2013 - 12:04 PM

Ok that does it then
I will start with the inexpensive Baader film and then later on if gods forbid the sun hooks me
I will look in to getting a Herschel prism and some filters

Thank you for the great help :bow:

#9 BYoesle

BYoesle

    Aurora

  • *****
  • Posts: 4901
  • Joined: 12 Jun 2004
  • Loc: Goldendale, Washington USA

Posted 31 January 2013 - 01:43 PM

Don’t ever look through a solar H alpha filter equipped telescope unless you’re prepared to spend a couple of thousand euros. :foreheadslap:

You will be hooked for sure by the view, which is the most stunning and dynamic view of anything available to amateurs in the heavens.

#10 jerwin

jerwin

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 955
  • Joined: 16 May 2012
  • Loc: Romeoville IL

Posted 31 January 2013 - 03:20 PM

Don’t ever look through a solar H alpha filter equipped telescope unless you’re prepared to spend a couple of thousand euros. :foreheadslap:

You will be hooked for sure by the view, which is the most stunning and dynamic view of anything available to amateurs in the heavens.


I was just going to chime in and mention without looking through an H-alpha scope you're only really seeing sunspots. Sun spots are still pretty cool to look at but you need h-alpha to see prominences and filaments and surface detail. calcium-k can also give good surface detail but I think most people go straight from white light to h-alpha. It will set you back a a few thousand before you realize it.

Jim

#11 Gert K A

Gert K A

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 291
  • Joined: 16 Jul 2012
  • Loc: Copenhagen, Denmark

Posted 31 January 2013 - 06:17 PM

Don’t ever look through a solar H alpha filter equipped telescope unless you’re prepared to spend a couple of thousand euros. :foreheadslap:

You will be hooked for sure by the view, which is the most stunning and dynamic view of anything available to amateurs in the heavens.


It sound terrible delightful and I bet you are right,
so I will take it easy and start with the film (that was what you guys meant.. Right?)
although now I’m even more intrigued and oh yes I have seen some of the prices on solar gear.
But couldn’t you say the same about anything in this hobby? like don’t ever look at Saturn in a telescope,
don’t ever point a webcam to the Moon, unless you are willing to back it up with cash.

Everything in amateur astronomy seems intent on making you spend, I used to hate shopping, but here not so much.
The better the gear the more gripping the sights, perfection always seems to be just around the corner,
it’s addictive in the sense that there is always that next step luring.
Soo If I have learned anything from this hobby, then it is to put it on a budget lol

Still thank you for the warning/temptation I will keep that in mind. :grin:

#12 StarStuff1

StarStuff1

    Soyuz

  • *****
  • Posts: 3875
  • Joined: 01 Apr 2007
  • Loc: South of the Mason-Dixon Line

Posted 01 February 2013 - 04:06 AM

I have used glass and Tuthill Solar Skreen filters for years and have enjoyed the white light views. Then a couple of years ago I finally gave in and bought a Lunt Ha scope. Then a few weeks ago there was some really nice sunspot activity. I had sold my white light scope (an AT66 with Thousand Oaks glass filter) so I dusted off an ancient 60mmm refracter, cleaned it up and made a holder for a piece of Baader film. I had forgotten how nice white light viewing can be sometimes.

Attached Files



#13 Gert K A

Gert K A

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 291
  • Joined: 16 Jul 2012
  • Loc: Copenhagen, Denmark

Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:14 AM

Nice low-tech setup you got there, inspiring indeed
Thx for sharing

#14 Aquarist

Aquarist

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1041
  • Joined: 27 Aug 2012
  • Loc: Illinois

Posted 01 February 2013 - 09:02 PM

Don’t ever look through a solar H alpha filter equipped telescope unless you’re prepared to spend a couple of thousand euros. :foreheadslap:

You will be hooked for sure by the view, which is the most stunning and dynamic view of anything available to amateurs in the heavens.


This warning occurred a bit late for me.






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics