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Super Nova in NCG3115

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#1 spacenuut

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 01:07 AM

I was looking at NCG3115 this evening, at least I was until the clouds rolled in again.

Any way, I took an image of ncg3115 and notice a bright spot on it's disk.Is this a super nova? I don't see it in other pictures so I figure I'd come to the group that knows. NGC3115 is in Sextans. Wishful thinking and all that.

I've attached my image.

Jayme H
spacenuut

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#2 Saint Aardvark

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 01:12 AM

Maybe this is what you saw...if so, sorry to be the bearer of bad news. :(

#3 spacenuut

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 01:34 AM

Well, that's why I came here. Thanks for the quick reply.

Darn!

Jayme

#4 Achernar

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 10:12 AM

Check out this website for information on known supernovae in other galaxies. It's possible that you could stumble across one, but this site and the other site could help you determine if you actually saw a supernova, or a foreground star in our galaxy.

http://www.rochester.../supernova.html
http://spider.seds.org/ngc/ngc.html

Taras

#5 Red Shift

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 04:52 PM

Since I absolutely DO NOT TRUST someone saying that another Astronomer discovered something first, I submit this info from the Hubble Legacy Archive.

Take a look at this thsite: The Hubble Legacy Archive, http://hla.stsci.edu/
ENTER SITE
SELECT IMAGES
TYPE IN 'NGC3115" and ENTER
and tell me that there is something there where your shot shows a bright object.

I think you have found something.

As far away as that galaxy is, any star would show up in the Hubble shot as well. The angle from that galaxy to Earth orbit ( or Earth surface in your case ) is JUST too small to NOT include an "in the way" star.

#6 GlennLeDrew

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 04:58 PM

Or it could be an asteroid, if the exposure was sufficiently short as to not show trailing due to orbital motion. But that would be quite the coincidence, to find a solar system body so precisely in the disk plane of a tiny galaxy...

Follow-up image required!

#7 Red Shift

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 05:23 PM

Yeah - could be an asteroid ( or maybe a comet )

Check this link out
http://www.ngcicproject.org/

look for NGC3115

#8 Ed D

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 06:11 PM

I agree that follow-up images would help in detecting motion. The pics St Aardvark linked appear to show the object closer to the galactic core than does your pic, and the Hubble pics Red Shift linked to don't show the object. Very interesting.

Ed D

#9 Saint Aardvark

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 11:22 AM

I absolutely agree that more follow-up images would be great, and of course I'm no expert. But this Hubble image seems to show something similar to spacenuut's image. (Red Shift, thanks for that link -- I had no idea!)

The bright star that's in the centre of spacenuut's image, very close to the top, seems to be at the bottom of the Hubble image, and seems to show the same orientation to 3115's disk. And the other star/supernova/what-have-you appears to be there too.

In spacenuut's image, the bright star at the top, the galaxy core and the mystery object are oriented like a clock showing 5pm. I think I see the same orientation, though upside-down, in the Hubble image. You can zoom out and it becomes a bit more apparent.

#10 atkinsonr

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 08:49 AM

I think the foreground star is there in the hubble images too, it's just that they are reversed in both axis as compared to spacenuut's; see this image for example: http://bit.ly/Xa4FMP






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