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Classic "WOW FACTOR" Moments

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#26 Dan /schechter

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 02:46 AM

Mine was in 1991 when I just received my 6" AP Starfire EDT and pointed at Saturn. I can close my eyes and see it and feel that "WOW" feeling.
Dan

#27 clintwhitman

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 09:08 AM

WOW Really? THE PAWN STARS ZEISS PICKUP DAN AND I WERE WOWED

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#28 Edward E

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 10:11 AM

My WOW factor was my first look through a telescope. I was 8, living in Atlanta, GA, mid 70s, my dad took me to Fernbank Science Center to look at Saturn...through a 36" telescope! I was already awed by the dome, then the size of the scope but the view! Even my dad was impressed. I still feel the feeling 40 years past.

#29 astro140

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 02:05 PM

mine was first view of saturn with the 6" AP
superplanetary ...cranking it up to over 600 x
and thinking i need to buy some higher power eyepieces.
etched in my mind forever.
:grin:


Hi Brian,
My wow memory was similar using my AP 152 f/12 superplanetary refractor on Saturn.
Steve
NM

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#30 Joe Cepleur

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 09:07 PM

Four "Wow!" moments transformed me:

Seeing stars for the first time in third grade, upon getting my first prescription glasses;

Seeing the Milky Way thirty-five years later, after moving to dark skies;

Finding and seeing Saturn's rings for the first time, after buying my first good scope (the 60mm Jason 313 Towa); and,

Marveling at a member of my club blithely pointing a 16" f/4.5 Newt on GEM at anything anyone requested. He knew exactly where everything was. I wanted to learn to do that.

#31 Dan /schechter

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 09:44 PM

Hey Clint,
The visit to Pawn Stars certainly was a WOW experience for both of us. Having them open the door for us while about one hundred people stood in line to get was icing on the cake as was the side visit with Ed Beyers on the way home.

Cheers,
Dan

#32 dgreyson

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 10:41 PM

My Classic Telescope wow moment was when my classic 10" newtonian wasnt a classic yet. Saturn was up, the air was clear and still, the stars were intensely bright, and I had just realized my wooden English yoke mount was way too heavy to drag out of the shed for first light.

#33 mikey cee

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 10:47 PM

Hey Dan, who is that wearing the Groucho Marx mask? :rofl5: Mike

#34 Dan /schechter

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Posted 06 February 2013 - 11:13 PM

Hi Mike,
Your guess is as good as mine.
Cheers,
Dan

#35 clintwhitman

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 05:25 AM

SAY THE SECRET WORD AND WIN $50!!! :lol:
Mike only you would say I look weird while standing next to the oldman!!
:foreheadslap: :roflmao:

#36 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:22 AM

My classic WOW moment was first light and my first view of the Pleiades (M45) with my brand new Tasco 6TE-5 refractor on Dec 26, 1967. :jump: I will always remember that night.

Rich (RLTYS)

#37 bremms

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 07:05 AM

Plieades is really such a beautiful object. Never gets old. It was the second thing my "new" D&G saw last night and it was Sooo nice

#38 Joe Cepleur

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 09:27 AM

How could I have omitted this? I had my Pleiades moments, too. The monents were classic, but the scope was not.

For a midlife birthday, I had received my first astronomical telescope (if it counts as such), a 4" Celestron FirstScope f/4 tabletop Dob. With its short tube and lack of finder, it was hard to point. There was construction in my yard, so I climbed up onto a bulldozer. With the scope on the hood, I could stand lower on the treads to better sight skyward. Somehow, I found the Pleiades, and "Wow!"

Two years later, I took that scope to a public star party. From the trunk of the car, it gave a young man his "Wow!" moment. Still recall his face in the dark, stunned and awed.

#39 Joe Cepleur

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 09:49 AM

Here's a classic moment with the 16" f/4.5 Newt in our club's dome: Saturn was boiling in the eyepiece. I was still awed, because I had never seen it so big. To compensate for the bad seeing, we stopped it down to a 6" f/12 off-axis, and "Wow!" It popped into superb clarity.

A few years later, our club's optician assembled one working Newt from two 8" long focus classics undergoing restoration, a Trecker and, I think, a Southern Pacific Instruments. The scope itself was stunningly long, evocative of a rare view; and, surely enough, the view of Saturn the best anyone had ever seen.

So many classic moments! Yes; they keep us going, always seeking the next.

#40 starman876

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 09:58 AM

One WOW moment was when I had an old Coulter 13.1" Dob

One night I aimed at the Pleiades and there in that wonderdul starfield was also the blue gas around the stars that you normally only see in pictures. I had never seen it like that visually. I did go WOW over and over again. This was from light polutted Washington DC skies.

#41 terraclarke

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 09:59 AM

Every time I look at this little pretty. This morning for instance when I was sitting in the dining room having breakfast. My eyes glanced toward the corner of the room and WOW :D

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#42 Jeff B

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 10:58 AM

Every time I look at this little pretty. This morning for instance when I was sitting in the dining room having breakfast. My eyes glanced toward the corner of the room and WOW :D


Nice scopes Terra.

So, how did you get them to stick to the wall like that? :question:

#43 tim53

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 11:14 AM

I've got a number of classic moments. This first story doesn't involve a scope or even a pair of binoculars, though. But it probably was the turning point when I decided I "needed" a real telescope.

I was in the Rockies for a mountaineering school in summer, 1971. We were camped near the base of Mt Columbia at just under 12,000'. I think we'd spent about a week there because the purpose was to climb Mt Columbia under full moonlight, starting from camp at midnight so we could watch the sunrise.

The sunrise was pretty darn spectacular in it's own right, but that's not the wow moment I'm referring to. I can't remember whether it was the week before or the week after that we'd spent at that campsite. Probably week before, which would mean that we stayed up pretty late telling stories around the campfire at night. ...because on this particular night when I sashayed off into the wilderland to talk to a man about a dog, the moon was gone and it was really dark. Still, I didn't notice until I found my designated shrub and turned off my flashlight, so as not to advertise my location to the rest of the camp (who wouldn't have given me a moment of peace, i'm sure!).

Anyway, after my eyes adapted to the dark, I spent several minutes looking up into the sky. It was really dark. Looking around me, I couldn't see any detail at all - just slightly brighter dark blobs where rocks and bare soil were between shrubs. The most memorable sky event I saw was a double meteor. I don't think I've ever seen one since, either. Literally, two meteors impacting the atmosphere at the same time, maybe half a moon-diameter apart and streaking parallel lines across the sky.

When walking back to camp, I tried doing it without using the flashlight. I made it, but it was pretty comical. Since I couldn't tell rocks from bare dirt, I couldn't see how far away they were, so I stumbled a lot. But I took it slow and got back with nothing but starlight as a guide.

I've never seen the night sky that dark since, even while visiting the Rockies and other high-altitude localities. There's too much *BLEEP* in the atmosphere what with jet exhaust and other particulates.

I ordered my Optical Craftsmen 8" Discoverer from Dick Nelson 4 months later.

-Tim.

#44 bremms

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:13 PM

That is a great story. +1
Terra, is that your yet unused 140? Hope you get first light soon. Love the way it looks with the Unihex

#45 bremms

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 01:16 PM

That's not a 140.. sorry. It's a 128? Dont know too much about them Uneetrons.. but the 140 is alt az I think

#46 terraclarke

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 05:32 PM

We had sun today finally. Clear and warm all day. I spent much of the afternoon outside doing white light and h-alpha solar, mostly h-alpha, using vintage scopes (my 60 mm Monolux and the 76mm Sears. Didn't get any of the Unitrons out under the sun today, don't have a way yet to use my h-alpha gear or white light wedges with them yet.
Yup, that's the 128 in the photo, the 140 is bigger and alt-az and residing in another corner of the room.
We have our club meeting tonite but if I get a chance when I get home, the 128 will be trained on Jup.

Terra

#47 starman876

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:36 PM

Now you do know that if you try real hard you will get what you need :band:

#48 Bonco

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 08:50 PM

Model 128

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#49 Bonco

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 08:51 PM

Model 142

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#50 bremms

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Posted 07 February 2013 - 10:16 PM

I haven't looked at H Alpha gear in ages. I remember the Daystar filters that were heated and needed an F30 light cone.
WE had our local meeting this evening. I'm giving the talk next month. Lot of work to do..






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