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Classic "WOW FACTOR" Moments

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#51 Joe Cepleur

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 04:24 AM

Model 128


What's the silver pipe? A sight tube used as a finder?

#52 mustgobigger

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 07:16 AM

Model 128


What's the silver pipe? A sight tube used as a finder?


its a rod for solar projection screens.

#53 Joe Cepleur

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 08:52 AM

its a rod for solar projection screens


!!!!!

Seemed kinda long and floppy to point reliably....

#54 careysub

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 10:03 AM

A memorable moment for me was in 1982, attending a star party at China Lake, California in the high desert, and seeing the Whirlpool Galaxy through a newly built Dobsonian (the first I had ever seen) with a 17.5" Coulter mirror.

It was a magical sight.

I said to myself right then - I've got to get me one of those someday!

But then graduate school, career and kids intervened, and I was out of the hobby until a few years ago. I currently am using my club's 22" Dobsonian for deep-sky but I have my 18" mirror (much better than the Coulter) with light-weight Dob designs under development.

#55 terraclarke

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 10:10 AM

By the late 60s, early 70s the solar projection kit was offered as an optional accessory and the brackets were on tube rings on the 128 (eq). Early to mid1960s used brackets (two) that were similar to those on the 140/142 that were fit into pre-drilled holes in the ota. Prior to that there was a single bracket to hold the rod. This bracket was similar to a finder bracket in that it had two rings at either end of a single bar-foot that attached to the tube. Rods also varied over time solid bar type rods to hollow aluminum pipe and eventually to what was 1/2 inch aluminum electrical conduit stock near the end.

The Unihex was also an option, you could either have that or a star diagonal and a porro prism. Another variable over time was a aperture stop to be used with the sun filter. That was not part of earlier offerings. The objective cell has also differed over the years from being identical in 114 and 128 to the 128 as in Bill's picture being made along the same lines as the 3 inch photo equatorial with the provision for a counter balance. That is not often seen as a counter balance is really not necessary on a scope of that length/weight due to the fact that heavier accessories, namely the camera would rarely be used with a 60 mm scope. Two wheel vs one wheel focusers are also seen on different iterations of the 128.

The one distinguishing feature is that the 114 was always alt-az and the 128 was always eq., everything else at times was the same (other than variations in eyepieces provided). Even the equatorial mount evolved over time. The earliest 128 eps have no setting circles, which distinguished the 128 eq mount from all others, but this also changed by the late 60s. Size was also a distinguishing factor, but the 128 and the 142 were much closer in size (the mounts) than the 142 and the 152 which was much larger.

#56 terraclarke

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 10:29 AM

Had one last night, a couple actually. After our meeting a half dozen or so of us went up and did a couple,of hours viewing with this puppy:

http://www.cincinnat...ervatory-44.jpg

It's an 1843, 11 inch, F18 Merz refractor. Jupiter was amazing. The four Gallilean moons were perfect disks and we watched one reach Jupiters limb and then recede beneath it. That was a WOW. Jupiter itself with its bands, festoons, and faint red spot left of center was a wow. But I have never seen an occultation of one of Jupiters moons by Jupiter in such detail.

The Great Nebula in Orion was one of the best views I have ever seen. The contrast was excellent and you could see the tendrils and dark patches like they were in a photo.

WOW! I love classic scopes and I love long refractors!

#57 mustgobigger

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 12:19 PM

Great Terra...One Day I need To visit A Observatory.
i Dod Have Some Great Views through a 32" Dob a Couple Years Back. :bow:

#58 Bill Friend

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 01:11 PM

Terra,

Definitely a WOW moment if there ever was one.

Speaking of classics... I noticed the in-transit Telementor in your sig. Please let us know how it compares to your other 60s!

Cheers,
Bill

#59 clintwhitman

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 08:08 AM

By the late 60s, early 70s the solar projection kit was offered as an optional accessory and the brackets were on tube rings on the 128 (eq). Early to mid1960s used brackets (two) that were similar to those on the 140/142 that were fit into pre-drilled holes in the ota. Prior to that there was a single bracket to hold the rod. This bracket was similar to a finder bracket in that it had two rings at either end of a single bar-foot that attached to the tube. Rods also varied over time solid bar type rods to hollow aluminum pipe and eventually to what was 1/2 inch aluminum electrical conduit stock near the end.

The Unihex was also an option, you could either have that or a star diagonal and a porro prism. Another variable over time was a aperture stop to be used with the sun filter. That was not part of earlier offerings. The objective cell has also differed over the years from being identical in 114 and 128 to the 128 as in Bill's picture being made along the same lines as the 3 inch photo equatorial with the provision for a counter balance. That is not often seen as a counter balance is really not necessary on a scope of that length/weight due to the fact that heavier accessories, namely the camera would rarely be used with a 60 mm scope. Two wheel vs one wheel focusers are also seen on different iterations of the 128.

The one distinguishing feature is that the 114 was always alt-az and the 128 was always eq., everything else at times was the same (other than variations in eyepieces provided). Even the equatorial mount evolved over time. The earliest 128 eps have no setting circles, which distinguished the 128 eq mount from all others, but this also changed by the late 60s. Size was also a distinguishing factor, but the 128 and the 142 were much closer in size (the mounts) than the 142 and the 152 which was much larger.


I just had a Wow Moment while reading your post on the particulars of Unitron design implementation!!
WOW AWESOME :foreheadslap: :jump:
(aveman

#60 BarabinoSr

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 09:46 AM

Great Thread, Clint! My most remembered Classic Wow Factor moment happened the night when I witnessed first light looking through the 14.25" f/7 Coulter reflector I built in 1983. The objects were M51 The Whirlpool Galaxy, M97(Owl Nebula) and Jupiter viewed during late spring of that year.I used a converted 2-inch wide field military style eyepiece with that scope. I had just bought the mirror set the year before from a former Pontchartrain Astronomy Society member. My astronomical history is replete with such moments but that was one of the best!!! Gary :jump: :jump:

#61 terraclarke

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 10:07 AM

Thanks Clint. Wow :rainbow:

Terra

#62 clintwhitman

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 01:54 PM

Carey, Nice to here of China Lake. Always drove the place for years and thought it might be a great observing site. Also good to see you drop by the classic group! :D

#63 terraclarke

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 02:25 PM

I love Pawn Stars. That would have been so cool. :bow:
I'd love to meet them and the American Pickers. I think Danielle on American Pickers is so cool!

Terra

#64 gelkin

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 08:36 PM

In the early 70s while still in high school i belonged to the our local college astronomy club. One event was observing a total lunar eclipse. In the wee hours of the night the shadow was leaving the moon as we all stood on the roof of the science building watching it conclude. Suddenly to the north of the moon a massive fireball burned across the sky in front of us. Blue, green, and orange as it burned out. You could even hear the snap, crakle, and pop. There was a collective moment of silence with dropped jaws and then, WOW.

Tonight i took out the 4" Unitron. First was Jupiter, of course. After a few minutes one of Jupiters moons started a slow seperation from the planets disc. I watched for several minutes as it moved further away and thought, WOW that was nice. Telescopes and observing the universe, WOW.

#65 Datapanic

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 01:47 AM

Personally, it's all WOW! Just Sayin'!

#66 bremms

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 10:03 AM

+1 for American Pickers. One of the things we watch as a family.
It is all just WOW. I still get a warm fuzzy or is it faint fuzzy feeling when I observe. This is good thread.

#67 sgorton99

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Posted 10 February 2013 - 10:08 AM

Post deleted by sgorton99

#68 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 11 February 2013 - 06:48 AM

Come on folks your drifting off subject.

Rich (RLTYS)






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