Jump to content


Photo

Brick walls for an observatory?

  • Please log in to reply
34 replies to this topic

#26 mikey cee

mikey cee

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8203
  • Joined: 18 Jan 2007
  • Loc: bellevue ne.

Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:01 PM

Conctrete blocks that are 6"x8"x16" have some decorative faces on them. They are easier to lay and make a circular layout easier than 8" block. Plus the hollow cores help insulte against heated air. They don't have abilty to do the intricate designs around the faux pas windows etc. Fake brick panels look like *BLEEP* when it comes outside corner joints etc. etc. They also make concrete bricks that are solid but are cheaper than clay bricks. I really comes down to tradeoffs and higher labor costs. ;) Mike

#27 JJK

JJK

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2085
  • Joined: 27 Apr 2008

Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:28 PM

This would certainly keep the inside wall of bricks cooler but the warm outside wall would cause a rising plume of warm air all around the observatory until they reached ambient temps, correct ? -Tim

If money wasn't an object (brick seems to be pretty expensive these days), I would think that you could build an airspace between two walls of bricks, to provide an air-space and insulate the inside from outside wall. I've seen late 1900's brick homes built this way.


That would be my guess, based on experience.

#28 JJK

JJK

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2085
  • Joined: 27 Apr 2008

Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:31 PM

One problem is that I don't know they export to Australia? And if we move it would most likely be overseas again. From the site it does look like they do kits though so I'll keep it in mind :)


Shipping to Australia would likely be high. However, a similar design would not be difficult to build by yourself.

#29 timwetherell

timwetherell

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 455
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2010
  • Loc: A Land Down Under

Posted 07 February 2013 - 06:57 PM

They're definitely very beautiful - way better than one would expect for something termed a "shed". One worry I'd have about wood is that Australia has a nasty habit of catching fire all the time. I guess as we saw at Stromlo, if you take a direct hit from a firestorm pretty much nothing will save you. But it does rain hot embers from time to time which can set fire to shingle roof.

I think from a seeing perspective wood is close to ideal though :)

#30 timwetherell

timwetherell

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 455
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2010
  • Loc: A Land Down Under

Posted 07 February 2013 - 07:02 PM

Fake brick panels look like *BLEEP* when it comes outside corner joints etc


Yes I can imagine they have a tendency to peel open if you're not careful just how they're set in place. I think we'd be aiming for a painted look regardless so there's more options for fillers etc if you don't care what the colour of them is.

I do worry that if we grew plants up the side (as apparently we will I'm told) they'd creep in the joints and bad things would result

#31 seryddwr

seryddwr

    Innocent Bystander

  • *****
  • Posts: 3392
  • Joined: 19 Feb 2010
  • Loc: La-la land.

Posted 08 February 2013 - 04:03 AM

I saw this at my local hardware store, today. I don't know whether they have anything like this in Oz, but anyway, it appears to be an aerated concrete, cast into fake vernier stones that are individually glued onto a wall.

#32 roscoe

roscoe

    curmudgeon

  • *****
  • Posts: 3520
  • Joined: 04 Feb 2009
  • Loc: NW Mass, inches from VT

Posted 08 February 2013 - 01:20 PM

Tim,

Well, that fine scope of yours DOES need a classy observatory!!

What about the idea of making fake face bricks out of wood timber pieces, cutting something like 2x8" stock into 16" long pieces, bevel the edges so as to look brick-like, and apply them over a plywood skin (could be screwed on from inside the skin) Decorative sections could be shaped into the wood or created with different thickness stock, and if you painted it with textured paint, would look very brick-like from a distance......or you could stucco it for a more real, and more fireproof, exterior. The whole could be made to be light enough that it could be un-bolted from its foundation piers and loaded aboard a tilt-bed truck.
An 8-sided structure built this way would be quite elegant!

Russ

#33 timwetherell

timwetherell

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 455
  • Joined: 03 Sep 2010
  • Loc: A Land Down Under

Posted 09 February 2013 - 01:12 AM

Thanks Russ :)

Yes it's about time it had a proper home. We might use some sort of wood and a stucco effect - still debating. I'm actually doing experiments with the roof materials to see what's best in the sun. So far a double skin of aluminium is the winner.

There's also the question of what kind of roof. My wife's totally set on a roof that essentially disappears because she like just watching the sky - especially the satellites going over. But from the outside we want it to look like a domes structure. So, current plan is a system like a pedal bin, where the dome flips over and off :)

#34 rimcrazy

rimcrazy

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 296
  • Joined: 03 Mar 2012
  • Loc: Overgaard, AZ

Posted 09 February 2013 - 07:09 AM

Just panel your roof with these You could then have a Head up Display overlay of the night sky.

Of course you will probably have to mortgage your house to do it. :grin:

Kinda cool actually but I'm sure besides the cost, there are a host of other impracticalities but interesting none the least.

#35 mikey cee

mikey cee

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8203
  • Joined: 18 Jan 2007
  • Loc: bellevue ne.

Posted 09 February 2013 - 11:11 AM

I guess my only real dislike of bricks is the labor. It is a slow process even for professional masons. Also it takes a real pro to layout brick so that you space and cut things properly to avoid getting painted into a corner. Awfully lot of cutting and brick is a SOB to cut. ;) Mike






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics