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Does anyone still have one of these eyepieces.

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#1 terraclarke

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 01:32 PM

I bought one of these from from Edmund Scientific back in 1966 for use with my home-built 6 inch F4.5 rich-field reflector. It was made of brass and quite heavy. Was advertised as coming from WWII, perhaps from an anti-aircraft gun sight as I remember. Since my scope had a 1.25 inch r&p focuser our neighbor across the street who was a machinist and had a complete machine shop in his garage turned an adaptor for me on his lathe from an old piece of brass. I loved that eyepiece, it had the "walking in space" feel to it that some ascribe to the famed Edmund 28mm RKE. As I remember, it had a focal length of 30mm. Looking through it at star fields felt like looking through the porthole of a spaceship. I wish I would have kept that eyepiece :bawling:

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#2 oldtimer

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 02:40 PM

I think I can get you very close... Almost all of the 'wide field' eyepieces of that era were of the Erfle design. Tuday's Nagler (and clone) designs have much better edge correction but at a heavy price. However if you liked that old 30mm Erfle I think Surplus Shed has something very similar. There stock number L10744 28mm 2" 'surplus' Erfle for $69

#3 Darren Drake

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 02:56 PM

I had one a lot like it back in the early '80's. It was my first "space walk" type eyepiece to..

#4 terraclarke

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 03:10 PM

Thanks Gary. I indeed have that Surplus Shed eyepiece (the 28mm military surplus ep) plus the 35mm one that looks almost identical, and an interesting 38mm brass odd sized one that I had to make an adapter for on a lathe. All are close, and that is why I bought them. I like them all but still none of them quite equal the experience that the old Edmund ep rendered. Perhaps it is just that it was such a neat memory of youth, or perhaps it is because I haven't used them on the same scope? I have used the SS eps on my 5 and 6 inch F5 refractors, so I would think they would be pretty comparible though.

Terra

#5 actionhac

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 06:38 PM

Hi Terra.

That eyepiece was used in the Edmund satellite scope, the one with the mirror in front of the objective.
And also the Edmund De-Luxe finder which was standard equipment on the 8"f8 reflector.
I'm sure it was also offered by itself but I don't know how Edmund identified it by itself.
You see the satellite scopes for sale from time to time and you could buy one and borrow the eyepiece for other uses. The De-Luxe finder is more common and less money and basically the same telescope.

Robert

#6 *skyguy*

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 06:42 PM

I also own one of these eyepieces. I bought it from Surplus Shed back in the late-80's for around $20 dollars. It's a 30mm Erfle and I believe it has a 68º AFOV ... from measurements taken many years ago. It's still one of my favorite eyepieces to use on my big dobs. It's a fantastic eyepiece and not for sale. ;)

There are also two pictures of it on Wikipedia under the heading of "EYEPIECES":

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eyepiece

Where it is incorrectly identified as a 51mm eyepiece.

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#7 terraclarke

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:11 PM

Hi Robert,

Edmund used to offer it separately as well. I think I paid something like 6 bucks for it as I remember. It was offered in the catalog around where they had those great big erfles that were also war surplus. I had a friend who got one of those and it was huge, even by today's standards. It was painted olive green and must have been close to 3 inches in diameter.
Hi James,
It was the Wiki article where I found the photo of the eyepiece and it totally rekindled my memory of how wonderful it was.

Terra

#8 actionhac

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:37 PM

This may be it, page 23 No.60,144:
http://geogdata.csun...dmundnodate.pdf

#9 terraclarke

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 07:48 PM

Robert!!!
That's it! It's on page 23 of the Edmund Catalog, middle of the hand column. It's the "mounted wide angle Kellner eyepiece" for $4.50. That is exactly the same as the one I had. It's just slightly over 2 inches in diameter. Says its a Kellner but also says "two cemented achromats"- sounds more like a plossl. It was a great eyepiece. Wish I still had it.

Terra

#10 starman876

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 08:01 PM

I have a 42mm eyepiece GSO superview that gives that wide sky feeling. I call it my cheap thrill :whistle:

#11 bremms

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 08:06 PM

Never had one of those, but I did have one of those giant Erfles on a copy scope. That was a nice set up, the "copy"lens came from Al Nagler back in the early 80's . My astro prof got two of them from Al and I built tubes. The eyepiece was massive and didn't work really well with the lens. I do remember that brass one from the catalog. Although, it wasn't until a few years later :)






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